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Offline Lady Amy of York

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Re: When your home is your Castle
« Reply #15 on: June 06, 2008, 11:03:19 PM »
Boldt Castle-in  Alexandria Bay, New York. You have to see this castle. It is huge !     Sits out in Alexandria Bay  which is  the gateway to the Saint Lawrence  River.    I will try to see if i can download  some pictures !  Here is  some history  on  it !


At the turn-of-the-century, George C. Boldt, millionaire proprietor of the world famous Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City, set out to build a full size rhineland castle in Alexandria Bay, on picturesque Heart Island.  The grandiose structure was to be a display of his love for his wife, Louise.

Beginning in 1900, Boldt's family shared four glorious summers on the island in the Alster Tower while 300 workers including stonemasons, carpenters, and artists fashioned the six story, 120 room castle, complete with tunnels, a powerhouse, Italian gardens, a drawbridge, and a dove cote. Not a single detail or expense was spared.

In 1904, tragedy struck. Boldt telegraphed the island and commanded the workers to immediately "stop all construction." Louise had died suddenly. A broken hearted Boldt could not imagine his dream castle without his beloved. Boldt never returned to the island, leaving behind the structure as a monument of his love.

For 73 years, the castle and various stone structures were left to the mercy of the wind, rain, ice, snow and vandals. When the Thousand Islands Bridge Authority acquired the property in 1977, it was decided that through the use of all net revenues from the castle operation it would be preserved for the enjoyment of future generations.

Since 1977, several million dollars have been applied to rehabilitating, restoring and improving the Heart Island structures.

You can take charter boats  there  and walk thru the castle. Also can be  married  there.
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Offline Lady Amy of York

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Re: When your home is your Castle
« Reply #16 on: June 06, 2008, 11:08:02 PM »
Here is more on Boldt castle.I find  it fascinating.

Boldt Castle was built at the turn of the century by multi-millionaire George C. Boldt for his wife, Louise, as a testimony of the unsurpassed love of a man for his wife.

Mr. Boldt came to America in the 1860's from Prussia, the son of poor parents. A man of tremendous industry and organizational skill, with daring and imagination, he became the most successful hotel magnate in America. He owned the famous Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City, and the Bellevue-Stratford in Philadelphia, Pennsysvania. He was the president of several other companies, a trustee of Cornell University, and the director of the Hotel Association of New York. For Boldt, to "dream" and to "do" were synonymous. And Boldt Castle stands as an eternal monument not only of a man's love for his wife, but also as a reminder that what a man's mind can conceive, his heart can accomplish. George Boldt was one man whose dreams, however fantastic, proved to be within his capacity to achieve. 
Like an ancient landmark of northern Europe, the castle is modeled after buildings of the 16th century, when newly revived classical details were applied to the towered, medieval forms, combining traditional elements with modern features, such as large, plate glass windows and extensive verandas. Rising six stores from the foundation level of the indoor swimming pool to the highest tower room, an elevator served the 120 room mansion. Steel and concrete roofs and floors provided fireproof construction. Massive granite walls were richly ornamented with decorative details of cast terr cotta, and roofs were tiled with the same material.

An underground passage led from the servants' dock on the water's edge. Goods transported from barges at the dock through this tunnel to storage rooms within the Castle's foundation. The tunnel also housed water pipes and electrical wiring from the Power House.

A rocky crest of the island was extended into a level plateau by making a promenade terrace on top of the stone-walled service tunnel. In contrast to the more natural landscape elsewhere on the island, this Italian Garden was to be geometrically formal, so high retaining walls were raised on the opposite side as well, making the plan symmetrical. At the opposite extremity of the garden from the Castle's Ball Room, a fountained pool was surrounded by a curved, lower terrace, overlooking the picturesque roofscape of the Power House. Marble statuary intended for the Italian Garden, was delivered from Italy. Some of these statues were found half a century later still in crates, sunk within an old boathouse.
 
Boldt invested over $2.5 million to build this replica of a Rhineland castle, bringing in the finest of artists and the most skilled craftsmen for this project. He planned on presenting it to his wife on Valentine's Day as a monument of his love for her. Work was underway on the eleven buildings that would comprise the castle complex when tragedy struck. In January of 1904 Louise Boldt died, ending the dreams of a lifetime. Heartbroken, Boldt telegrammed his construction crews ordering that all work be stopped. Three hundred workmen dropped their tools and left the island. Boldt never returned to the island, leaving it instead as an unfinished monument of a love story cut short.For 73 years the Castle and the other structures on the island were left to the mercy of the wind, rain, ice, snow, and vandals. When the Thousand Islands Bridge Authority acquired the property in 1977 it was decided that through the use of all net revenues from the Castle operation, it would be preserved for the enjoyment of future generations. Since then several million dollars have been applied to rehabilitating and restoring the Heart Island structures. The island is now fully accessible to the handicapped, has complete restroom facilities, picnic areas, as well as a food and beverage concession to make your visit more comfortable. 
Wander in awe as you explore the Castle's 120 rooms, and try to imagine how they might have been luxuriously furnished and used in all their splendor, if Louise Boldt had not died so early. Gaze out the Castle's 365 windows that overlook the magnificent beauty of the Thousand Islands. And imagine the gaiety and parties that might have been held in the castle and the surrounding gardens.

The first level of the Castle has been turned into a museum, filled with exhibits dedicated to the lives of George and Louise Boldt and the development of the Thousand Island region.

Stroll the paved walkways that traverse the island leading to the Castle, the Power House, Alster Tower, the Hennery, and the Gazebo.
 
Examine the Power House and Clock Tower, designed after the fashion of a Medieval Tower, and located on the eastern end of Heart Island. This facility was intended to house coal fired steam generators to provide electricity to the island. An arched, stone bridge connects the Power House to the island, and the highest tower provided river traffic with illuminated clock faces and the music of chimes. Inside you'll find displays and photographs depicting the lifestyle of a by-gone era in the Thousand Islands at the turn of the century. You'll also find its steam engine generator, typical of the type that would have been used to provide power and illumination for the island estate. 
Alster Tower, the Boldt's playhouse, was the first structure Boldt erected on Heart Island. Its design suggests a defense tower similar to those on the Alster River in Germany. But this curious mini-castle probably was not pre-designed, since it would have been nearly impossible to describe its eccentric and irregular forms on paper. It was likely improvised by Boldt himself in a highly personal manner, and evolving as it rose. This building was intended for the entertainment of guests and the Boldt children. The ornate "Shell Room" was to be used for dancing, and was so named because of the shape of the roof. The basement housed a bowling alley, and the upper floors were to include a billiard room, library, bedrooms, cafe, grill and kitchen. Unlike the main residence, which was never completed, this whimsical "play house" was completed and occupied by the Boldt family during the four years when the Castle was being erected. After extensive renovations to repair the deterioration of the edifice, Alster Tower is now open to visitors.
The Arch, patterned after the Arch d'Triumph, was intended to provide a formal grand entry for launches that would deliver guests from large yachts anchored in deep water, or from other islands and the mainland. The arch was to be a welcoming point for guests, and symbolized Boldt's triumph over poverty. Stones were cut and delivered for double rows of columns which would enclose a covered walkway, extending from each side of the arch. A drawbridge within the opening was to provide a promenade on the embankment of the Swan Pond. Unfortunately, this ambitious project was far from complete when work was ceased at the death of Louise Boldt.
 
The Boldt Yacht House, located on nearby Wellesley Island can be seen from Heart Island's north side, was built to house the family's three yachts and houseboat. The main space rises 64 feet to accomodate tall masts and rigging of their yacht in slips 128 feet long, with doors so huge and heavy that an engine was required to open and close them. The yacht house included a shop to build racing launches as well as living quarters for the crew and maintenance staff. The Yacht House was opened to the public for the first time in the summer of 1996, after undergoing extensive repairs. It now serves as a museum where you can see some of the boats actually used by the Boldt family.

Plan to spend your next vacation in the Thousand Islands Region and tour Boldt Castle in person. You will want to return again and again to witness the improvements as the repairs and reconstruction continue.


The island where Boldt Castle stands was named Heart Island by Mr. Boldt, perhaps because of the romantic significance of the name, and in recognition of the physical shape of the island after his modifications. Before then, however, the island was named Hart Island, after the previous owners. The original home which stood on the castle site when George Boldt purchased the island was slid across the ice to Wellesley Island during the winter of 1899, being made a part of the exclusive Thousand Island Club frequented by the very wealthy of the period. That home is now being renovated as a Bed & Breakfast, and has been renamed Hart House in honor of the original owners.

-----------------------------------
 
 Rising six stories from the foundation level of the indoor swimming pool to the highest water tower, Boldt Castle is an immense building. The dimensions of the base are about 160 feet long by 115 feet wide.
George Boldt's new summer house has an elevator to help serve its over 127 rooms, 30 of which are bathrooms. It is built of light granite, steel, concrete, and cast terra cotta, giving it its sound and fireproof qualities. The granite was quarried at Mr. Boldt's own stone quarry, on Oak Island, ten miles downriver from Heart Island.


 

The dimensions of this chateau provide for an unusually large number of apartments. It is large enough to accomodate one hundred guests and their servants. From the main entrance of the castle, visitors enter the main great hall, from which rises the Grand Marble Staircase to the floors above, all of which rooms are surrounded by balconies.

At the very top of the building is a large stained-glass dome skylight which, originally was to have provisions for a continuos flow of water to flow over it, lighted by electricity at night and open sky by day.

 


 Under the Grand Staircase is a door leading to a flight of stairs to the basement level of the castle. Here the wine was to be stored as well as a room for ice to be kept. There was to be a bakery, a swimming pool, and a boiler room for the steam heating of the house. Other rooms, all of which contain fireplaces, were to be used as dressing and lounging rooms, in conjunction with the pool.

Access to underground servants tunnels are on the lower level also, and were used by the servants to transport supplies from the waters edge to storage rooms in the basement of the castle.


 

 

 



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« Last Edit: June 06, 2008, 11:19:27 PM by lady amy of york »
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Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: When your home is your Castle
« Reply #17 on: June 08, 2008, 10:44:07 AM »
Here is more on Boldt castle.I find  it fascinating.


Boldt Castle was built at the turn of the century by multi-millionaire George C. Boldt for his wife, Louise, as a testimony of the unsurpassed love of a man for his wife.

Mr. Boldt came to America in the 1860's from Prussia, the son of poor parents. A man of tremendous industry and organizational skill, with daring and imagination, he became the most successful hotel magnate in America. He owned the famous Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City, and the Bellevue-Stratford in Philadelphia, Pennsysvania. He was the president of several other companies, a trustee of Cornell University, and the director of the Hotel Association of New York. For Boldt, to "dream" and to "do" were synonymous. And Boldt Castle stands as an eternal monument not only of a man's love for his wife, but also as a reminder that what a man's mind can conceive, his heart can accomplish. George Boldt was one man whose dreams, however fantastic, proved to be within his capacity to achieve. 
Like an ancient landmark of northern Europe, the castle is modeled after buildings of the 16th century, when newly revived classical details were applied to the towered, medieval forms, combining traditional elements with modern features, such as large, plate glass windows and extensive verandas. Rising six stores from the foundation level of the indoor swimming pool to the highest tower room, an elevator served the 120 room mansion. Steel and concrete roofs and floors provided fireproof construction. Massive granite walls were richly ornamented with decorative details of cast terr cotta, and roofs were tiled with the same material.

An underground passage led from the servants' dock on the water's edge. Goods transported from barges at the dock through this tunnel to storage rooms within the Castle's foundation. The tunnel also housed water pipes and electrical wiring from the Power House.

A rocky crest of the island was extended into a level plateau by making a promenade terrace on top of the stone-walled service tunnel. In contrast to the more natural landscape elsewhere on the island, this Italian Garden was to be geometrically formal, so high retaining walls were raised on the opposite side as well, making the plan symmetrical. At the opposite extremity of the garden from the Castle's Ball Room, a fountained pool was surrounded by a curved, lower terrace, overlooking the picturesque roofscape of the Power House. Marble statuary intended for the Italian Garden, was delivered from Italy. Some of these statues were found half a century later still in crates, sunk within an old boathouse.
 
Boldt invested over $2.5 million to build this replica of a Rhineland castle, bringing in the finest of artists and the most skilled craftsmen for this project. He planned on presenting it to his wife on Valentine's Day as a monument of his love for her. Work was underway on the eleven buildings that would comprise the castle complex when tragedy struck. In January of 1904 Louise Boldt died, ending the dreams of a lifetime. Heartbroken, Boldt telegrammed his construction crews ordering that all work be stopped. Three hundred workmen dropped their tools and left the island. Boldt never returned to the island, leaving it instead as an unfinished monument of a love story cut short.For 73 years the Castle and the other structures on the island were left to the mercy of the wind, rain, ice, snow, and vandals. When the Thousand Islands Bridge Authority acquired the property in 1977 it was decided that through the use of all net revenues from the Castle operation, it would be preserved for the enjoyment of future generations. Since then several million dollars have been applied to rehabilitating and restoring the Heart Island structures. The island is now fully accessible to the handicapped, has complete restroom facilities, picnic areas, as well as a food and beverage concession to make your visit more comfortable. 
Wander in awe as you explore the Castle's 120 rooms, and try to imagine how they might have been luxuriously furnished and used in all their splendor, if Louise Boldt had not died so early. Gaze out the Castle's 365 windows that overlook the magnificent beauty of the Thousand Islands. And imagine the gaiety and parties that might have been held in the castle and the surrounding gardens.

The first level of the Castle has been turned into a museum, filled with exhibits dedicated to the lives of George and Louise Boldt and the development of the Thousand Island region.

Stroll the paved walkways that traverse the island leading to the Castle, the Power House, Alster Tower, the Hennery, and the Gazebo.
 
Examine the Power House and Clock Tower, designed after the fashion of a Medieval Tower, and located on the eastern end of Heart Island. This facility was intended to house coal fired steam generators to provide electricity to the island. An arched, stone bridge connects the Power House to the island, and the highest tower provided river traffic with illuminated clock faces and the music of chimes. Inside you'll find displays and photographs depicting the lifestyle of a by-gone era in the Thousand Islands at the turn of the century. You'll also find its steam engine generator, typical of the type that would have been used to provide power and illumination for the island estate. 
Alster Tower, the Boldt's playhouse, was the first structure Boldt erected on Heart Island. Its design suggests a defense tower similar to those on the Alster River in Germany. But this curious mini-castle probably was not pre-designed, since it would have been nearly impossible to describe its eccentric and irregular forms on paper. It was likely improvised by Boldt himself in a highly personal manner, and evolving as it rose. This building was intended for the entertainment of guests and the Boldt children. The ornate "Shell Room" was to be used for dancing, and was so named because of the shape of the roof. The basement housed a bowling alley, and the upper floors were to include a billiard room, library, bedrooms, cafe, grill and kitchen. Unlike the main residence, which was never completed, this whimsical "play house" was completed and occupied by the Boldt family during the four years when the Castle was being erected. After extensive renovations to repair the deterioration of the edifice, Alster Tower is now open to visitors.
The Arch, patterned after the Arch d'Triumph, was intended to provide a formal grand entry for launches that would deliver guests from large yachts anchored in deep water, or from other islands and the mainland. The arch was to be a welcoming point for guests, and symbolized Boldt's triumph over poverty. Stones were cut and delivered for double rows of columns which would enclose a covered walkway, extending from each side of the arch. A drawbridge within the opening was to provide a promenade on the embankment of the Swan Pond. Unfortunately, this ambitious project was far from complete when work was ceased at the death of Louise Boldt.
 
The Boldt Yacht House, located on nearby Wellesley Island can be seen from Heart Island's north side, was built to house the family's three yachts and houseboat. The main space rises 64 feet to accomodate tall masts and rigging of their yacht in slips 128 feet long, with doors so huge and heavy that an engine was required to open and close them. The yacht house included a shop to build racing launches as well as living quarters for the crew and maintenance staff. The Yacht House was opened to the public for the first time in the summer of 1996, after undergoing extensive repairs. It now serves as a museum where you can see some of the boats actually used by the Boldt family.

Plan to spend your next vacation in the Thousand Islands Region and tour Boldt Castle in person. You will want to return again and again to witness the improvements as the repairs and reconstruction continue.


The island where Boldt Castle stands was named Heart Island by Mr. Boldt, perhaps because of the romantic significance of the name, and in recognition of the physical shape of the island after his modifications. Before then, however, the island was named Hart Island, after the previous owners. The original home which stood on the castle site when George Boldt purchased the island was slid across the ice to Wellesley Island during the winter of 1899, being made a part of the exclusive Thousand Island Club frequented by the very wealthy of the period. That home is now being renovated as a Bed & Breakfast, and has been renamed Hart House in honor of the original owners.

-----------------------------------
 
 Rising six stories from the foundation level of the indoor swimming pool to the highest water tower, Boldt Castle is an immense building. The dimensions of the base are about 160 feet long by 115 feet wide.
George Boldt's new summer house has an elevator to help serve its over 127 rooms, 30 of which are bathrooms. It is built of light granite, steel, concrete, and cast terra cotta, giving it its sound and fireproof qualities. The granite was quarried at Mr. Boldt's own stone quarry, on Oak Island, ten miles downriver from Heart Island.


 

The dimensions of this chateau provide for an unusually large number of apartments. It is large enough to accomodate one hundred guests and their servants. From the main entrance of the castle, visitors enter the main great hall, from which rises the Grand Marble Staircase to the floors above, all of which rooms are surrounded by balconies.

At the very top of the building is a large stained-glass dome skylight which, originally was to have provisions for a continuos flow of water to flow over it, lighted by electricity at night and open sky by day.

 


 Under the Grand Staircase is a door leading to a flight of stairs to the basement level of the castle. Here the wine was to be stored as well as a room for ice to be kept. There was to be a bakery, a swimming pool, and a boiler room for the steam heating of the house. Other rooms, all of which contain fireplaces, were to be used as dressing and lounging rooms, in conjunction with the pool.

Access to underground servants tunnels are on the lower level also, and were used by the servants to transport supplies from the waters edge to storage rooms in the basement of the castle.



Wow amazing place. thanks for posting this.
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Offline Lady Amy of York

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Re: When your home is your Castle
« Reply #18 on: June 08, 2008, 11:21:37 AM »
 The next time  I am  up that way I will make sure  i have my camera along with the  zoom  lens   so i can take  some pictures.     It is  only a half hour from me.  ;D  One of these days i have to  take  the boat tour.
   If anyone  does ever think about visiting  this place  go in  september when they are still open.   June-August, Alexandria Bay gets packed with tourists  on the weekend !
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Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: When your home is your Castle
« Reply #19 on: June 09, 2008, 06:36:49 AM »
Franklin Castle (also known as the Tiedemann House) is a historical house on Cleveland's west side located at 4308 Franklin Blvd. The building has four stories and more than twenty rooms. It is purported to be the most haunted house in Ohio.
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Offline Elennare

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Re: When your home is your Castle
« Reply #21 on: June 11, 2008, 11:25:09 AM »
I can add 2 more to the list.  Sadly I don't have any pictures.

Both in Michigan.  One is in Birmingham, and while I don't know the proper name for it (if it has one) is called the Adams Castle, because it's just off of Adams road.  It's pretty big, and very cool looking.

The other one is in St. Claire Shores.  The guy just down the street from my cousin's house is renovating his house to look like a castle.  It has a turret for the front of the house, with a big balcony over the front door, the second floor extends over the 2 door garage, which is build with arches instead of regular doors.  It's not all that big, but it is definately a castle, and very cool looking.
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Offline Yrose

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Re: When your home is your Castle
« Reply #22 on: June 11, 2008, 12:36:25 PM »


Galveston’s grandest and best-known building, the Bishop’s Palace is an ornate delight of colored stone, intricately carved ornaments, rare woods, stained-glass windows, bronze dragons and other sculptures, luxury materials and furnishings, and impressive fireplaces from around the world (including one lined with pure silver!).

Built by lawyer Colonel Walter Gresham and designed by Nicholas Clayton, Galveston’s premier architect, this Victorian castle was cited by the American Institute of Architects as one of the 100 most important buildings in America. The home was built from 1886 to 1892.
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Offline Yrose

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Re: When your home is your Castle
« Reply #23 on: June 11, 2008, 12:40:27 PM »
Here is more on Boldt castle.I find  it fascinating.

Boldt Castle was built at the turn of the century by multi-millionaire George C. Boldt for his wife, Louise, as a testimony of the unsurpassed love of a man for his wife.


Lady  Amy, I'm so glad you posted this. Sir Edward has told me about the Boldt Castle over the years and how he wants to go back. I read the article to him.
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Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: When your home is your Castle
« Reply #24 on: June 23, 2008, 06:37:07 AM »
Facade Nord at Eagle Mountain Lake in Texas is supposed to be a miniature replica of Castle Buchanan.
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Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: When your home is your Castle
« Reply #25 on: July 16, 2008, 10:19:28 AM »
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Offline brier patch charlie

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Re: When your home is your Castle
« Reply #26 on: July 17, 2008, 12:55:47 AM »
To bad there all in France!
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Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: When your home is your Castle
« Reply #27 on: October 06, 2008, 06:50:58 AM »
Stronghold Castle
Tudor Replica.
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Re: When your home is your Castle
« Reply #28 on: May 20, 2009, 07:32:18 AM »
Thank you so much for visiting Alnwick castle! We went there this summer, since it was where a couple of the Harry Potter movies were filmed. I loved the fact that it is still lived in. In the library, among all the old books, were a foosball table, a remote-controlled helicopter, a bar, and several TV remotes. It's closed to the public from Oct-Mar because the family is there.

Can you pu Warkworth castle up? We went there this summer as well, and stayed in a B&B where my window looked right at the castle. Here's a picture of the castle, taken from inside my bedroom:


Also, does anyone know if this is an actual castle, or just a random watch-tower? It's right past a bridge, a few minutes from Cobh, Ireland:

It would be easier to identify the tower for sale if we knew exactly where the picture was taken. Cobh is a large town in County Cork.
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Offline Lady Rebecca

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Re: When your home is your Castle
« Reply #29 on: May 20, 2009, 06:49:01 PM »
I looked it up on google maps. It's right off of R624. You go over a bridge, and then R624 splits at the tower, and it turns into Belvelly Cottages Rd if you turn right instead of left. Technically, I think it would be considered Belvelly, not Cobh. But nevermind, I found it on wikipedia. This is what it said: "Belvelly Castle is a 15th century tower house in County Cork. It is situated next to the small village of Belvelly, next to the only bridge connecting Great Island (on which the town of Cobh is situated) to the mainland."

Here's the real estate listing. The price has been reduced down to 190k euros. Anyone want to buy a piece of history?
http://www.myhome.ie/residential/search/brochure/belvelly-castle-fota-cork-city-outer/YAYJY363002

 

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