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Author Topic: The person behind the portrait  (Read 12630 times)

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Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #15 on: September 29, 2010, 04:57:32 AM »
This is what makes history more interesting...the people who had lives just like we do, joys, disappointments, hopes and sorrows.
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Offline Welsh Wench

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #16 on: September 29, 2010, 06:17:12 AM »
Nell was always a favorite of mine. I love Restoration England ever since I read Forever Amber.

And some of the pranks she pulled were classics. Almost makes me wish I could do what she did sometimes.  :D

Thanks again for a wonderful, intelligent topic. The negative and 'how much' topics get wearisome.

Now...back to portraits!  ;D
« Last Edit: September 29, 2010, 06:20:51 AM by Welsh Wench »
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Offline Anna Iram

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #17 on: September 29, 2010, 06:38:43 AM »
I agree Dona that this is a wonderful topic. Reminds one to look beyond the beautiful clothing and find out a little more about the person. I've said this many times, but it must have been so hard to be a woman back then. Or for that matter a man. Life was full of intrigues at every step, and wars and disease....and hopefully some sucesses and some loves.  If you didn't want to drown you HAD to live by your wits!

For my picture, I will admit to looking for the picture after the fact rather than it being my inspiration, but given this Lady's story, I felt it would fit in nicely here. It surprises me I can't find anything other than a picture of her chastisement. She was said to be truely lovely. The Rose of London.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jane_Shore


 
« Last Edit: September 29, 2010, 06:57:01 AM by Anna Iram »

Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #18 on: September 29, 2010, 04:15:44 PM »


For my picture, I will admit to looking for the picture after the fact rather than it being my inspiration, but given this Lady's story, I felt it would fit in nicely here. It surprises me I can't find anything other than a picture of her chastisement. She was said to be truely lovely. The Rose of London.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jane_Shore

 
http://www.medieval-life-and-times.info/medieval-women/jane-shore.htm
Unfortunately Jane Shore lived in a time where almost the only portraits of women were those in personal books of hourly prayers showing her as a supplicant before a saint, or on altar pieces as the donor. Usually the altar pieces showed the benafactress as a supplicant also.
Apparently she and her husband did have tomb brasses in Hinxworth Church, Hertfordshire, England, but they were destroyed during the reformation.
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Offline Welsh Wench

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #19 on: September 29, 2010, 08:12:21 PM »


Barbara Palmer, known as Lady Castlemaine, was Charles II's mistress. She gave him five children. Maybe six. The last is up for grabs.

She married Roger Palmer against his family's wishes; his father predicted that she would make him one of the most miserable men in the world. Palmer was a Roman Catholic. The two separated in 1662, following the birth of her first son. They remained married for his lifetime, but it is believed that Palmer did not father any of his wife's children.

Barbara was known for her dual nature. Diarist John Evelyn called her "the curse of the nation" yet others described her as great fun, keeping a good table and with a heart to match her famous temper. Lady Barbara took advantage of her influence over the King, using it to her own benefit. She would help herself to money from the Privy Purse and take bribes from the Spanish and the French. She was famously extravagant and promiscuous.

To put Nell Gwyn in her place, Lady Castlemaine drove her luxurious new coach drawn by six horses back and forth in front of Nell's house. The King had never given Nell anything half so valuable.
The following day, Nell drove a broken down cart pulled by six oxen in front of Barbara's house and yelled, "Whores to market, ho!"

Oh, to be at King Charles' Court now that spring is here!  ;D
« Last Edit: September 29, 2010, 08:13:36 PM by Welsh Wench »
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Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #20 on: October 01, 2010, 05:18:02 AM »
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haus_Manrique_de_Lara  
This portrait by Corneille Lyon is presumed to be the same lady as this chalk drawing by Jean Clouet.
Labeled Dona Ana Mauriquez, the painting is actually of Dona Ana Manrique de Lara. Between 1531 and 1536 she served as a lady in waiting for Eleonor of Austria who was queen of France. During this time three portraits were made, two chalk drawings by Jean Clouet and one painting by Corneille Lyon. Ana was the daughter of Juan II Fernández Manrique de Lara, third Marqués de Aguilar de Campóo. In 1536 she married Antonio Manrique de Lara, fifth Conde de Paredes de Nava and had a daughter Inés. Unfortunately Dona Ana died on the 6th of January, 1542. She was probably 29 at the time of her death. Wenchie comes up with funny stories, I come up with sad ones.

« Last Edit: October 01, 2010, 03:26:09 PM by DonaCatalina »
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Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #21 on: October 03, 2010, 08:12:39 AM »
Today you get a double dose of tragedy.
Isabel de Avis and Trastámara was born in Lisbon , October 24 of 1503. She was also known as Isabel of Portugal. In 1521 Isabel's father died and her brother succeeded to the throne as king John III. The marriage negotiations between the Portuguese and Spanish began almost immediately. It was agreed that the new king would marry Catherine of Austria, Charles V's younger sister. The union between Charles and Isabel only took place three years later, by procuration in 1525. The Infanta travelled to Seville where the wedding took place on 11 March 1526.  Although it was a political union, the marriage proved to be a love-match. Records say that during their honeymoon "when [Charles and Isabel] are together, although there are many people around, they do not notice anyone else; they talk and laugh, and nothing else distracts them." They had six children, the youngest being Juan ( April 30 of 1539 ) as a result of whose birth killed Isabel of Portugal. She died in Toledo , May 1 of 1539, while Carlos was in Austria. He was so distraught over her death that he refused to marry again.

Beatriz of Portugal, the younger sister of Isabel was born December 31 of 1504. She married Charles III, Duke of Savoy . They had nine children, but only Emmanuel Philibert, Duke of Savoy ( born 1528) would reach adulthood. The birth of her ninth child, John of Savoy, on January 8 of 1538 resulted in her death, the same fate which would overtake her sister the next year.

For a long time I've tried to find the name of the painter or a larger photo of this portrait, the sisters look so much alike.
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Offline operafantomet

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #22 on: October 03, 2010, 09:38:42 AM »


Long known as "Portrait of a lady" by Pontormo, most scholars today attribute it to Bronzino, albeit influenced by his master Pontormo. So who is she?

Gabrielle Langdon, author of "Medici Women" has given an intriguing and plausible interpretation. Due to the presence of Medici heraldry (green and red were Medici colours, and those sleeves of her are actually green, though they appear black. She also wears a pointed Medici diamond on her finger) she ought to be a member of the Medici family. The lapdog points to her role as a faithful woman. But the most interesting aspect still is the book behind the chair. Langdon comments on the black bands of the book, and suggests the sitter is Maria Salviati, wife of Giovanni delle Bande Nere (black bands). If that is the case the portrait was most likely painted in 1525 or 1526, right before she was widowed. In her widowed state she always wore novice clothes of black, grey and white, with a veil over her head. She was known for her pious soul and religious faith. There are several depictions of her as widow, like these two by Pontormo:



She was a Medici both by birth and by marriage, and albeit her short marriage only gave her one child, this child managed to marry a most fertile woman and got 11 children with her (8 who survived infantry), as well as various children before and after that marriage. Most of these children were in the care of Maria Salviati. Not that the parent didn't care for them. They were much loved children. But their grandmother was responsible for their upbringing and teaching, as was common in noble families. Here's some of the children she had in her care:
http://aneafiles.webs.com/renaissancegallery/medicis.html

The parents (or of some guards) of these children were duke Cosimo I de' Medici and Eleonora di Toledo:


(Eleonora is depicted with their son Giovanni, which became both cardinal and arch bishop of Pisa, and he would probably have become pope too had he not died young. He died of malaria in Pisa, shortly before his mother).

Some of you have already commented on the beautiful portrait of Bianca "Bia" de' Medici, which was Cosimo's illegitimate daughter. She was a much loved child, and very similar to her father. In the portrait of her in white dress ("bianca") she's actually wearing her father's medallion around her neck, to erase all doubt of her parentage. Only Cosimo and maria Salviati knew who the girl's mother was, and they took that secret with them to the grave.

Maria, Cosimo's eldest daughter, was also very much alike her father. And not just in looks. Cosimo once said "she is my mirror" or something like that, because she reminded of him in temper and spirit too. Her premature death were greatly mourned. Maria Salviati died the year after Bianca, in 1543, and her death was considered a great loss. Not only had she brought up her only son and his many children, she also contributed greatly to his advantageous marriage to the princess Eleonora, daughter of viceroy of Naples. The fact that Cosimo was a true Medici both through his mother and father also contributed to his election as duke of Florence. She was very much the woman behind Cosimo until her death. If it is true that the woman in red is indeed Maria Salviati (I think it looks a lot like her too, compared to the known portraits), it helps flesh out the image of a woman who played a great part in the Florentine aristocracy.

Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #23 on: October 05, 2010, 08:40:40 AM »
This is one lady who changed the course of world history.
Isabel de Castilla (22 April 1451 – 26 November 1504) was Queen of Castile and León. Isabella was of a very fair complexion, had blue eyes, and had a hair color that was between reddish-blonde and auburn; these were typical in members of the Trastámara family who were descendants of Pedro I of Castile. Most painting of her make her hair appear to be darker. Queen Isabella rejected Christopher Columbus's plan to reach the Indies by sailing west (2000 miles, according to Columbus) more than three times before changing her mind. It actually took her about 1-2 years to agree to his plan. She pawned her jewels to finance the expedition. One interesting story recorded by the a contemporary source shows her wit and personal strength. When Ferdinand was pressed by Aragonese nobles to assume sole control over their joint kingdoms, Isabel answered him that God had given them yet one child, a daughter. If the hereditary tradions of Castile should be set aside for his sake, then he should expect that if the two of them passed leaving only the one child, the same fate would befall her. Would he wish to see some nobleman of Castile assert male ascendency over the legitimate heir and usurp the Aragonese throne of his forefathers?
Ferdinand acceded to her argument and Spanish law thereafter recognized inheritance by male or female equally.

« Last Edit: October 05, 2010, 08:43:34 AM by DonaCatalina »
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Offline Welsh Wench

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #24 on: October 07, 2010, 08:10:54 AM »


The daughter of a Breton family of ancient and distinguished lineage, Louise de Kérouaille was maid of honour to the Duchess of Orleans, Charles' sister, who took her her to England in 1670. The King fell for Louise's baby-faced beauty on sight and she became maitresse en titre-official mistress-in 1671. The following year she gave birth to her first child, Charles Lennox, later Duke of Richmond. Louise herself was created Duchess of Portsmouth.

She attempted to persuade Charles to become an Catholic, a suicidal move in strongly Protestant England. Charles was canny enough to resist, despite his own Catholic leanings. She reportedly engineered the disgrace of the prominent courtier, the Duke of Buckingham and in 1677, another of Charles' mistresses, Lady Castlemaine. She fought off several rivals, including the Duchess of Mazarin, a further mistress, and the young Duke of Monmouth. She ingratiated herself, sometimes through sexual favours, with powerful men, including the influential statesman the Earl of Danby.

Meanwhile, Louise was building a substantial nest-egg. She enjoyed a splendid apartment at Whitehall Palace, which was redesigned three times to satisfy her expensive tastes. In addition, she was allowed £40,000 a year from the royal coffers. In total, the rapacious Louise accumulated over £136,668 from her royal connection.

Nell's name for Louise who had a slight cast in on eye, was Squintabella. Another name Nell gave her was 'weeping willow', since Louise would use tears to prize some gift or favour from the King. Both nicknames infuriated Louise, but amused Charles.

Wouldn't you just love to be at a cocktail party with those two?  :D


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Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #25 on: October 12, 2010, 09:23:18 AM »
Martín de Gurrea y Aragón. In this portrait we have the iconic image of a Spanish nobleman, or at least how popular opinion came to think of him. Born in Pedrola ( Zaragoza ), Spain in 1526, he inherited the titles of Duke of Villahermosa and Count of Ribagorza. Don Martin was married in the early 1540's to Dona Luisa de Borja y Aragon, the family of the Dukes of Gandia , great granddaughter of the Borgia Pope Alexander VI and sister of Francisco de Borja . Doña Luisa died in 1560 after giving birth to eight children: Juan, Fernando, Ana Martin, Francis, Mary, Agnes and Juana (who died as a child). Don Martin was a friend of Cardinal Granville and Phillip II who he accompanied to England for the marriage with Mary I of England.
He died in Veruela Monastery in 1581

(do his ears look rather Spockish?)
« Last Edit: October 12, 2010, 03:16:25 PM by DonaCatalina »
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Offline Rowen MacD

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #26 on: October 12, 2010, 09:54:26 AM »

The daughter of a Breton family of ancient and distinguished lineage, Louise de Kérouaille was maid of honour to the Duchess of Orleans, Charles' sister, who took her her to England in 1670. The King fell for Louise's baby-faced beauty on sight and she became maitresse en titre-official mistress-in 1671. The following year she gave birth to her first child, Charles Lennox, later Duke of Richmond. Louise herself was created Duchess of Portsmouth.
Nell's name for Louise who had a slight cast in on eye, was Squintabella. Another name Nell gave her was 'weeping willow', since Louise would use tears to prize some gift or favour from the King. Both nicknames infuriated Louise, but amused Charles.
Wouldn't you just love to be at a cocktail party with those two?  :D
  She was also Barbara Palmers' successor as the Royal mistress. 
  Note: I recently finished Dark Angels by Karleen Koen; a fun and well researched fictional account of the court of Charles II.  Louise and Barbara Palmer are both portrayed, with Louise in a much more sympathetic light than her predecessor.   
The dumber people think you are, the more surprised they're going to be when you kill them~William Clayton

Offline Welsh Wench

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #27 on: October 12, 2010, 01:09:27 PM »
Rowen, I think you would like Forever Amber.
It was banned in Boston in 1944.

But then...what wasn't?   :D

Aside from Nell Gwyn--who was an absolute delight---Barbara Palmer is quite the character too!
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Offline Anna Iram

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #28 on: October 12, 2010, 03:25:32 PM »
I may have to give this book another try myself. I've had it for years, since you'd recommended it to me several years ago. I'm not really into romantic novels, preferring biographies more, but perhaps this will be a good winter read for me as well.  :)
« Last Edit: October 12, 2010, 03:26:03 PM by Anna Iram »

Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #29 on: October 17, 2010, 08:12:33 AM »
Eleanor of Austria (15 November 1498 – 25 February 1558), Born in Louvain as the eldest child of Philip of Austria and Joanna of Castile, who would later become co-sovereigns of Castile. Her siblings were: Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand I, Queen Isabella of Denmark, Queen Mary of Hungary and Queen Catherine of Portugal.
In 1529, by the treaty called "La Paz de las Damas" (The Ladies' Peace), it was stipulated that a marriage should take place. She was married to Francois I of France (her second husband) on 4 July 1530. They had no children as Francis ignored her except in matters of state and preferred his mistresses. As Chartles V favorite sister, she was the unofficial liaison between the two monarchs. It seems she did not mind missing Francois's bed in exchange for wealth and influence.


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