Author Topic: The person behind the portrait  (Read 37485 times)

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Offline operafantomet

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #60 on: January 18, 2011, 05:21:23 PM »

Maddalena Strozzi Doni

The Tuscan family Strozzi had a long story of being patronages of art and artists, and Maddalena Strozzi continued that in her marriage. She married the rich cloth merchant Agnolo Doni in 1503 or 1504, and the portraits of the couple were painted some two years later by Raphael. At this point Raphael had probably seen Leonardo's "Mona Lisa", and used that portrait's idea of a seated woman in 3/4 profile towards a landscape in the portrait of Maddalena.

The attest to her husband's profession can be seen in the striking fabrics she's wearing. She also displays three rings and a pendant with red and green gems and with a big drop pearl. Such pendants were common for brides, so she's probably showing off her status as a fairly newly wed woman. Her dress is quite typical for early 16th century Florentine dresses, except her front lacing. Such front lacing was more common in the north. But it do occur in other dresses of the era. The tie-on sleeves of a different fabric and the semi-long bodice is typical, though.

Around the same time as the portraits, the couple also commissioned a Holy Family depiction from Michelangelo. This is usually referred to as "The Doni tondo", and is one of Michelangelo's most famous paintings apart from the Sistine Chapel, of course. It's suggested it was ordered in connection with the birth of their first daughter, or to commemorate their marriage, and the family and domestic focus of the tondo has been commented on by several. The Strozzi coat-of-arms with three crescent moons are included in the period frame.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doni_Tondo

Both the Doni tondo and the portraits of the Doni couple is in the Palazzo Pitti in Florence, in the same room. The portraits are of the same size and with a similar background and poses. They also wear almost opposite colours of eachother. They're meant to hang together. Luckilly they still do. Too many pendant portraits have been separated through the years. Both portraits can be seen here:
http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ritratto_di_Maddalena_Strozzi

Italian brides didn't take the last name of their husband, but kept their own family name. In Italy the woman depicted is still referred to as Maddalena Strozzi. However, Victorians used the name of her husband, so in English languaged literature she is called Maddalena Doni. As a compromise she is often called by both last names...
« Last Edit: January 19, 2011, 02:43:29 AM by operafantomet »

Offline RenResearcher

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #61 on: March 20, 2011, 11:54:56 PM »


The above picture is an excerpt from The Wedding Dance painted by Pieter Bruegel the Elder in 1566. The identity of this person is unknown; lost to history, if indeed even an accurate depiction of an actual individual. It is a tribute to Bruegel’s skills that I am totally able to connect with the expression of relaxed enjoyment on his face and in his posture as he dances. This is one of my favorite paintings.

Offline Becky10

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #62 on: March 21, 2011, 02:02:50 AM »
James V of Scotland was King of Scots from 9 September 1513 until his premature death at the age of 30.
He was the nephew of Henry VIII of England, and was just seventeen months old when his father was killed at the Battle of Flodden Field on 9 September 1513. The young king was controlled as a virtual prisoner by the 6th Earl of Angus until 1528 and assumed the reins of government himself.
James sailed to France for his first marriage and fathered his only legitimate child, Mary Stuart.
According to legend, James was nicknamed "King of the Commons" as he would sometimes travel around Scotland, disguised as a common man, describing himself as the Gudeman of Ballengeich. Also according to legend, what he learned of the Scottish people while out like that convinced him that his heir should not marry Edward, Henry's son. The memory of Edward, Hammer of the Highlands, was strong among the common people. The 'rough wooing' that Henry VIII pursued reinforced fears of what would happen to Scotland if an English monarch sat on the throne. By the time of James V death, most of the nobility had come to agree with him, regardless of bribes and blandishments from England. Who know how history might have turned had he lived longer.

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Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #63 on: September 09, 2011, 02:16:09 PM »
MARGARET AUDLEY (1539-January 10, 1564)

Margaret Audley was one of the wealthiest young women in England when she was married at thirteen to Lord Henry Dudley (1531-August 27,1557), younger son of the duke of Northumberland. The only child of Thomas Audley, 1st baron Audley (1488-April 30,1544) and Elizabeth Grey (c.1510-c.1564), she had inherited lands worth £1000 per annum, including Cree Church Place in London and Audley End on the outskirts of Saffron Walden. These were confiscated when the duke was found guilty of treason and executed. Henry Dudley was restored in blood on July 5,1556 and his wife's lands were returned, but he died in France after the Battle of Saint Quentin the following year.  In December 1558, she became the second wife of Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk, who was her fifth cousin, through their descent from Jacquetta of Luxembourg and Richard Woodville. Margaret's line of descent came from the marriage of Elizabeth Woodville and John Grey, while Thomas Howard's line of descent came through Elizabeth Woodville's sister, Catherine, who had married Henry Stafford. Parliament ratified the marriage in March, 1559. After participating in the coronation, Margaret and her new husband retired to Kenninghall and did not return to London until the following autumn. The marriage appears to have been a love match and produced four children, Elizabeth (1560-d. yng), Thomas (1561-1626), Margaret (1562-1591), and William (December, 1563-1640). So great was Margaret’s desire to rejoin her husband for Christmas in 1563 that she left Audley End when she was still weak from childbirth. She died on 9 January 1564, three weeks after the birth of her last child. She was buried at St. John the Baptist's church at Norwich.
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Offline Archer

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #64 on: November 28, 2011, 07:48:16 AM »


          Sir Thomas More, English lawyer.   7 February 1478  – 6 July 1535

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Thomas_More
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Offline Welsh Wench

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #65 on: December 11, 2011, 07:21:18 PM »
The last of the 'uncrowned queen of France',, Jeanne Antoinette Poisson became the mistress of Louis XV, the grandson of the Sun King, Louis XIV. Known to her family as Reinette because a fortune teller predicted she would reign over the heart of a king, this fascinating woman became Madame de Pompadour

Too much to write on her life, I will just post the link. Click on for some facets of her life including her checkbook expenditures.

http://www.madamedepompadour.com/_eng_pomp/home.htm


A fascinating, beautiful woman.  Dr Who thought so too.


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Offline Adriana Rose

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #66 on: December 17, 2011, 10:19:33 AM »
I loved that episode! " I just snogged Madame Depompadour!" hehe

Offline Welsh Wench

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #67 on: December 17, 2011, 10:27:21 AM »
Oh, to be at Versailles now that the Doctor is there......*sigh*  ;)
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Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #68 on: January 05, 2012, 04:05:33 PM »


Madame de Clermont-Tallard LOUISE,
Larger image here
Countess of Tonnerre,
first Duchess of Uzès
1504 at the Château de Tallard
Louise was a maid of honor and a friend of Queen Catherine de Medicis.
She married, April 10, 1556, Antoine de Crussol, born in Uzès June 21, 1528.
She was outspoken and enjoyed the familiarity of the Royal Court. For a time she toyed with Protestantism, but to the dismay of Catholic and Calvinist authorities, she gave herself great freedom in religious interpretation. Poets published works in her honor and called her the jewel of the court. It was at Mont-de-Marsan , in May 1565 , that Catherine de Medici rewarded the loyalty of Antoine de Crussol by elevating him as Duke of Uzès, making her friend Louise the Duchess.
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Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #69 on: January 06, 2012, 07:37:46 AM »

Edward I of England. This effigy portrait is the basis for most modern representations.
Edward,Ned to his family, was born 17 June 1239. As a person and a king, the movie Braveheart was not too far off the mark in its representation. The years 1264–1267 saw the conflict known as the Second Barons' War, in which baronial forces led by Simon de Montfort fought against those who remained resisted royal abuses by King Henry III. The first scene of battle was the city of Gloucester, which Edward managed to retake from the enemy. When Robert de Ferrers, earl of Derby, came to the assistance of the rebels, Edward negotiated a truce with the earl, the terms of which he later broke. This set the model for his life and reputation. Though the average citizen loved him as the model of royalty; to his contemporaries he was known as a Pard, a leopard who could change its spots at will. The instances of King Edwrad's oathbreaking are too numerous to list here. To secure his position as Prince of Wales, Llywelyn ap Gruffudd made a treaty with Edward I as a vassal of the Crown. His reward was for King Edward to encourage the Marcher Lords to raid Wales and give sanctuary to would-be assassins such as Owen de la Pole and Llywelyn's own brother Daffyd. The straw that broke the camel's back was when King Edward abducted Eleanor de Monfort, Llywelyn's wife and Princess of Wales. Edward held her prisoner for three years until he forced Llywelyn to surrender Wales through a war of conquest.

It was the example of the last Prince of Wales that Robert the Bruce had before him when offered the Crown of Scotland in exchange for homage to England's king.
He died on 7 July 1307 of an lingering case of Dysentery; perhaps a fitting end to a liar, oath-breaker, murderer and thief.
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Offline Welsh Wench

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #70 on: January 06, 2012, 03:31:40 PM »


He died on 7 July 1307 of an lingering case of Dysentery; perhaps a fitting end to a liar, oath-breaker, murderer and thief.

Coming from a long line of Welshmen, I whole-heartedly agree.
« Last Edit: January 06, 2012, 03:32:03 PM by Welsh Wench »
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Offline angusmacinnes

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #71 on: January 06, 2012, 06:33:48 PM »
Being Scottish I am glad to know he probably turned over in his grave when JAmesVI of Scotland became James I of England.
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Offline Welsh Wench

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #72 on: January 14, 2012, 10:57:55 AM »
The reconstruction of the face of Eleanor of Acquitaine. This is really  neat!

She really needs no introduction. Her reputation precedes her.


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Offline Lady Renee Buchanan

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #73 on: January 14, 2012, 02:01:55 PM »
The reconstruction of the face of Eleanor of Acquitaine. This is really  neat!

She really needs no introduction. Her reputation precedes her.




That was amazing!  Loved the re-creation.
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Offline JimsDana

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Re: The person behind the portrait
« Reply #74 on: January 14, 2012, 07:57:04 PM »
Wow!
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