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Author Topic: New to Renfests would love to go to one in costume where to begin?  (Read 3375 times)

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Offline Rowan MacD

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Re: New to Renfests would love to go to one in costume where to begin?
« Reply #30 on: May 05, 2015, 03:19:15 PM »
  Indeed, the outfits worn by my husband and I in my profile pic (now a bit different; also a work in progress) cost about $300.00 in materials to make; not including jewelry, hats, proper undergarments such as corset and farthingale (another $200.00) and accessories, like fans, boots  and pouches. 


   I just purchased a lovely french hood at faire in an oxblood velveteen for $85.00 (a steal!) to go with an as-yet-to-be-started project, for which I have already sunk about $250.00 into fabrics alone. 
  I also bought the pattern for it online (currently out of print) for $40.00.
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Offline Lady Renee Buchanan

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Re: New to Renfests would love to go to one in costume where to begin?
« Reply #31 on: May 05, 2015, 04:53:56 PM »
A kilt is a great idea if you are worried about the heat.  Look in the Scottish section for trusted vendors.  My husband's formal kilt from Scotland cost over $600.  Would he ever wear it to faire?  No!  I'd kill him!  From several vendors, you can get acrylic kilts -good for sitting on hay bales, the ground, or splintery wooden benches starting from $59.  Even for a big man, they usually only add an extra $20 or so for the extra fabric needed.

And all you need is a pouffy shirt, no doublet needed.  Jos Townsound and sons has the kilt socks for around $10 a pair.  My husband's calfs are 19" around, and they fit him. 

I'll try to find out the KC vendor and post it on here.
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Offline isabelladangelo

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Re: New to Renfests would love to go to one in costume where to begin?
« Reply #32 on: May 05, 2015, 09:26:17 PM »
A kilt is a great idea if you are worried about the heat.  Look in the Scottish section for trusted vendors.  My husband's formal kilt from Scotland cost over $600.  Would he ever wear it to faire?  No!  I'd kill him!  From several vendors, you can get acrylic kilts -good for sitting on hay bales, the ground, or splintery wooden benches starting from $59.  Even for a big man, they usually only add an extra $20 or so for the extra fabric needed.

And all you need is a pouffy shirt, no doublet needed.  Jos Townsound and sons has the kilt socks for around $10 a pair.  My husband's calfs are 19" around, and they fit him. 

I'll try to find out the KC vendor and post it on here.

Honestly, I'd worry about a kilt if heat is a problem.  A period correct kilt is normally about 6 or 7 yards of fabric - not exactly heat friendly.  There is a reason they still wear them in the cooler weather of Scotland. 

A true wool kilt is going to be way too warm.  I have yet to find anything acrylic that doesn't feel like peeling paint on your skin in the heat - not fun.   Even a modern kilt - which what far too many people wear to faire sadly- is still a few yards of wool fabric.   

For someone that has issues tolerating the heat, I really think the something like this but in linen is the way to go.   That with a white tunic/shift top is something that can be added on to later but will look correct and be comfortable. 

Offline Diaval

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Re: New to Renfests would love to go to one in costume where to begin?
« Reply #33 on: May 05, 2015, 09:37:27 PM »
Hello All,

OMG, there has been an explosion of responses since I was here last night.   I am probably just going to answer to parts of relevance just so that this doesn't become a big mess.  So I apologize ahead of time for hacking away at your responses.


Linen. Linen. Linen.  All the way for breathability.  Linen wicks away the sweat from your skin.  My favorite chemises are made out of a linen/cotton blend - awesome stuff.   You can just wear a white linen tunic top with light colored linen trousers - there are plenty of illuminations and paintings showing men working out in the field with that and a straw hat on.  Seriously this was a thing.  It would keep you comfortable and look correct.

Ok, I will keep Linen in mind then.  Staying comfortable is definitely important.   That picture does look funny as most of the guys look like they are wearing sweat pants!

No, she is referring to what time frame in history and what country (Europe or elsewhere) you would like to look like. Every country and region had different styles. Styles changed greatly from the 1400s to the 1550s.  :)

Whoops!  misunderstood THAT by a mile.  Actually I don't really know, especially when it comes to the men's outfits.   Women seem to be easier to pick out for, albeit something along the lines of those 'fairy' dresses.  Not sure how period accurate they are, but I do see them all the time in movies:

http://img1.etsystatic.com/013/1/5873598/il_fullxfull.450346841_260p.jpg

For a guy...well I have seen a few different outfits I like, but I have not homed in on anything yet.

The Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire in Manheim PA runs August 1, through the end of October. 

Gina

Yeah, that is a little too far for me.  The whole point was to find things to do this summer/fall that are close to home.  I was disappointed to find the one Renfest on Long Island closed up shop after last year.

A simple outfit for you would be a basic peasant shirt with a belt and some baggy pants or a kilt.  The pics on renshirts are a good example.  You could add a vest for a little upgrade or a doublet for a higher class look.  You don't have to go for a specific time period, just having the right "feel" to the outfit works fine.

I do like the doublet more than the vest, but I have seen prices on those to be through the roof.  I think I might have to 'secumb' and go with more of a worker / peasant look.  But I don't want to look the medieval equivalent of a bum.   The only thing I am worried is that my wife would seriously outclass me.  I have a tendency to go more overboard on her outfits than my own.  I am sure you saw that link to the Maleficent costume I put together for her,  right?

Yes, I really don't want to be locked into a specific time.  Something that 'generally' looks good.   I have been kicking around the kilt idea as well.

Question:  I have noticed that it seems like the medieval outfits don't have pockets.  So then I most certainly would need some kind of pouch then as I would need something to put my wallet and camera in (two modern things I will be needing).

agree - start with the simple stuff and shop at faire.  (I was asked once how I became an Earl - I said "just bought nicer clothes  :D )

The only thing is usually the prices at the fair are more expensive than on-line.  But I like your reasoning.  Just buy nicer clothes to 'move up' a class or two.

   Greetings and well met! You're gonna have fun here!

  Greetings as well and it sure sounds like it!

Quote

   Forgive me if I'm repeating anything , but after scanning your posts (I'm at work) I get the impression that you have never been to a faire before?

Nope!

Quote
   I would highly recommend you do that first, in mundane (street) clothes.   Enjoy yourself. Look around. Check out the other folks.   Decide what you want to be, and then decide how to do it.
   I don't recommend jumping in the deep end, when you aren't sure you know how to swim.; or even if you will want to learn.
 
  Dressing as a Noble and not ending up looking like a Halloween costume reject is not cheap.
  In fact it's too expensive for most folks, even those who are serious about going to faire in garb.     
 

Well, I do want a basic look then as I would think it is nicer to go dressed up.   But I am well aware of the horrors of Halloween costumes.  I have twin boys of 8 years of age and buying Halloween costumes for half of those years has taught me well about them and how they are made.  One thing is for certain, I am no stranger to Halloween.   So I know, which is why I have chosen to do something better and more unique for my wife last year.  Her outfit certainly doesn't look store bought.  Heck, she had REAL horns to boot!

Yeah, but I have been looking at 'nobelman' type outfits and I do see what you mean.  They are very expensive.  I don't mind going simpler even if it means a worker or peasant.  I just don't want to look like the afore mentioned 'reject'.

Oh the stories I could tell of those poor unfortunate souls who did wear the cheap Halloween costume rejects...and very much regretted it.  Like the Lady who was told they didn't wear bras in period and the dresses were just tied tight enough to be self supporting...which doesn't work with poly panne velvet as she discovered after a long day in the sun and her neckline went from boat to navel (punny!!!).  By 3 pm, various individuals were offering all sorts of sunscreens (way too late, she was redder than the dress she was wearing) and veils to help cover and prevent further sunburns.   That dress was so stretched by the end of the day (and the trim was starting to fall off) that I'm sure it went straight into the garbage bag.

As my wife would say, "Whot a Disaaasta." (What a disaster)

As I mentioned to Rowan above, I am all too familiar with the troubles of cheap Halloween costumes.   

Quote
If you don't sew, garb is very pricey.  Noble outfits are easily in the $1k arena if they are done well and with good quality materials at Faire.  Online, you can find good ones for $500 new, $300 used.   Stick with basics for now.   White linen t-tunic and light colored trousers are you best bet. 

Sadly no.  When I was younger my mom did have a sewing machine and I found my way around it when she wanted to have curtains cut down and new pockets made for the rods.  That is the extent of my sewing knowledge.

  Indeed, the outfits worn by my husband and I in my profile pic (now a bit different; also a work in progress) cost about $300.00 in materials to make; not including jewelry, hats, proper undergarments such as corset and farthingale (another $200.00) and accessories, like fans, boots  and pouches. 

Yeah, those outfits are beautiful and awesome!  Really fancy.  Great job on those.   It would be a long time before I reach that level for certain.  As I said above,  I just wanted something that looks decent without me (or anyone in my family) looking like a medieval bum.

A kilt is a great idea if you are worried about the heat.

That is what I was thinking.  I was often mistaken for being Irish and Scottish.  I have blond hair (whatever is left of it) and blue eyes.  But heck, this guy looks fine in a kilt:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyaTYsB3OJM

LOL!  I know the music isn't to my liking but I had a good laugh watching this.  But I think what he is wearing is a cool look.  I like that kilt he is wearing too.  The strange thing is if you picture him near bald and with a bit more of a belly and no beard, well that is kind of what I look like.   Yep, not quite like Diaval in the movie.

Quote
  Look in the Scottish section for trusted vendors.  My husband's formal kilt from Scotland cost over $600. 
  Would he ever wear it to faire?  No!  I'd kill him!

Oh, yeah, that I know.  I have a cousin in Florida that played the bagpipes in a 'Kiltie' band, he told me how much the genuine kilts cost.

Quote
  From several vendors, you can get acrylic kilts -good for sitting on hay bales, the ground, or splintery wooden benches starting from $59.  Even for a big man, they usually only add an extra $20 or so for the extra fabric needed.

That sounds great. 

Quote
And all you need is a pouffy shirt, no doublet needed.  Jos Townsound and sons has the kilt socks for around $10 a pair.  My husband's calfs are 19" around, and they fit him.

Yes, I have seen those shirts and they usually have a lace tie.   Want to laugh?  My calves are the SAME size.

Alright, thank you all for the information and again I am sorry for the quick and abrupt responses.  I was amazed to see how many responded.  I do appreciate it.

Have a good night all and thanks again!

Diaval
 

I'll try to find out the KC vendor and post it on here.
[/quote]
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Offline isabelladangelo

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Re: New to Renfests would love to go to one in costume where to begin?
« Reply #34 on: May 05, 2015, 09:50:27 PM »
Quote
Whoops!  misunderstood THAT by a mile.  Actually I don't really know, especially when it comes to the men's outfits.   Women seem to be easier to pick out for, albeit something along the lines of those 'fairy' dresses.  Not sure how period accurate they are, but I do see them all the time in movies:

http://img1.etsystatic.com/013/1/5873598/il_fullxfull.450346841_260p.jpg

Okay, for her then, you are looking for a late 12th century/early 13th century dress with angel sleeves (or wide sleeves).  They are really, really simple to make so you'll see a lot of them online.  (One of my friends used to call it the cut and fold dress since all you do is cut this shape out on the fold of  the fabric and sew up the side seams. 

Add some trim and you are done!   You'll see a few on etsy and on ebay - again, natural fabrics are key.  The one you linked to is panne velvet and that's not fun after a few hours in the sun.  (I've mentioned before on the boards but I'll say it again, I've seen more people wearing synthetic fibers collapse from dehydration/heat exhaustion at faire or other events than those wearing natural fibers.   Not that you can't while wearing cotton - it's just more common for people wearing poly-dead dino to overheat.)

Offline Diaval

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Re: New to Renfests would love to go to one in costume where to begin?
« Reply #35 on: May 05, 2015, 10:16:57 PM »
Honestly, I'd worry about a kilt if heat is a problem.  A period correct kilt is normally about 6 or 7 yards of fabric - not exactly heat friendly.  There is a reason they still wear them in the cooler weather of Scotland.

A true wool kilt is going to be way too warm.  I have yet to find anything acrylic that doesn't feel like peeling paint on your skin in the heat - not fun.   Even a modern kilt - which what far too many people wear to faire sadly- is still a few yards of wool fabric.

Bummer!  I thought I was on to something.   While watching some clips of Renfests on YouTube I saw quite a few guys running around in kilts and that gave me the idea, why not?  Legs are open much like shorts.  Didn't think that with all that wool it would like wearing a comforter around your waist.   Still, those clips I saw were taken from dead heat of summer.  Even one clip was from Texas!

Quote
For someone that has issues tolerating the heat, I really think the something like this but in linen is the way to go.   That with a white tunic/shift top is something that can be added on to later but will look correct and be comfortable.

For some reason, THAT looks warm.  But I could be mistaken.  But...they don't have my size.

Okay, for her then, you are looking for a late 12th century/early 13th century dress with angel sleeves (or wide sleeves).  They are really, really simple to make so you'll see a lot of them online.  (One of my friends used to call it the cut and fold dress since all you do is cut this shape out on the fold of  the fabric and sew up the side seams. Add some trim and you are done!  You'll see a few on etsy and on ebay - again, natural fabrics are key.

Ok, I will take a look there.

Quote
  The one you linked to is panne velvet and that's not fun after a few hours in the sun.

Oh, no, I only linked to that one for the style.  It would certainly would have to be made from a lighter material.

Quote
  (I've mentioned before on the boards but I'll say it again, I've seen more people wearing synthetic fibers collapse from dehydration/heat exhaustion at faire or other events than those wearing natural fibers.   Not that you can't while wearing cotton - it's just more common for people wearing poly-dead dino to overheat.)

It does kind of make you wonder why faire organizers hold Renfests in the dead heat of summer?   I don't get that part.  Don't they realize that the nature of the bulk of these costumes should dictate running fairs in cooler weather?   As it is I find that the majority of the renfests run in August.  But there were at least two I came across that ran in JULY?!?!?!?   There are some that run to late September and only a handful in the more weather appropriate October.     Now I am not just talking about those people walking around.  What about the performers or worse the people dressed in armor as knights for the jousting tourney and fighting?  You figure they HAVE to be cooking in that can!

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Offline Lady Renee Buchanan

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Re: New to Renfests would love to go to one in costume where to begin?
« Reply #36 on: May 06, 2015, 05:49:04 AM »
About the kilt.  Bristol is during July and August through Labor Day.  The usual summer temps range from the lower 90's to over 100 degrees, humidity between 90 to 95%.  On those days, my husband specifically wears his kilt with just a shirt.  Again, you wouldn't wear an expensive, 8 or 9 yards  wool kilt to faire, but judging from the huge amount of guys at Bristol wearing kilts when it's hot, it seems to be their go to choice for the weather.  Sure, an acrylic kilt is not wool, but even though it's acrylic, Steve finds it much cooler than wearing regular garb.
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Offline isabelladangelo

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Re: New to Renfests would love to go to one in costume where to begin?
« Reply #37 on: May 06, 2015, 05:51:03 AM »
Quote
It does kind of make you wonder why faire organizers hold Renfests in the dead heat of summer?   I don't get that part.  Don't they realize that the nature of the bulk of these costumes should dictate running fairs in cooler weather?

Because schools out.  :-)   That really is the entire reason.   

Also, I don't want to completely discourage you from wearing a great kilt if you want - they do look wonderful when done correctly.  Just know they are wool and they are many, many yards of material.  Now, since most of your heat loss comes from your neck/shoulders/chest area, you might be okay with a kilt.   However, since you said heat was a problem, I wanted to make sure you understand what you are getting into.

Also, the more skin that is covered by hankyweight/lightweight material, the better you will be in the sun.  The reason people in the Middle East cover up isn't just religious - it's because lightweight material helps to create a natural sunscreen like barrier between you and the sun.  No sunburns!  Also, the material will help keep the sweat off of you.  You will be MUCH cooler with a long sleeves puffy white cotton or linen tunic/shift that with your regular t-shirt. 

Offline Lady Renee Buchanan

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Re: New to Renfests would love to go to one in costume where to begin?
« Reply #38 on: May 06, 2015, 06:01:35 AM »
I don't think he is talking about wearing a great kilt.  We are talking about a $59 Econokilt, which would be fine, since the family is not going for historical accuracy, and at this point, price is a huge consideration.

Steve in Arizona last winter at 95 degrees in his kilt.

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Offline isabelladangelo

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Re: New to Renfests would love to go to one in costume where to begin?
« Reply #39 on: May 06, 2015, 07:44:50 AM »
I understand and I mentioned modern kilts versus historically accurate kilts earlier. Still, if someone has heat problems, natural fibers are going to be the way to go (and are a good idea even without heat issues).   

Offline Trillium

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Re: New to Renfests would love to go to one in costume where to begin?
« Reply #40 on: May 06, 2015, 11:01:30 AM »
The Malificent outfit was wonderful!!  Don't know about NYRF but she would fit in fine at any of the faires here in TX.  If you want the family to match that is great, but you don't have to.  My hubby always wears his barbarian/dwarf costume, my son is currently into knights tunics, and mine varies between fae, pirate, and gypsy depending on mood and weather.  Don't think we have ever been looked at strangely for it.  (If we were, I didn't notice!).

Most people get pouches that attach to belts to put your stuff in, you can find them all over the internet and at faire.  Prices vary greatly depending fabric, style, size, and intricacy.  Ladies can also use baskets or pouches with loops to hold on their wrist.  But, you may also be able to find some pants with pockets, they will most likely be covered by your tunic anyway and its a modern convenience that no one would bat an eye at.
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Offline Orphena

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Re: New to Renfests would love to go to one in costume where to begin?
« Reply #41 on: May 06, 2015, 01:45:30 PM »
You already have lots of advice, but a little bit more!

For you - Shirt in 100% cotton or 100% linen. Loose baggy pants (modern is fine to start) or kilt, belt with pouch to hold the necessities.  HAT (trust me - hats are your friends!) - look for a straw hat, or make that your first purchase of the day. Footwear is usually expensive, so stick with whatever you have to be comfortable in.

For your wife - Shirt in 100% cotton or 100% linen. Bodice (which is the female top - sometimes boned - likely best to get this at faire to ensure fit. Long, loose skirt - or layer 2. HAT. Footwear as you find it. (Under floor length skirts, your feet are not as visible.)

For the kids - Pants or shorts, plus a shirt. For a pirate look, add a sash, a bandana and a hat.  For a knight look, procure a tunic, and a helmet. Or leave the accessories off, and let them pick what they like at faire.

I'm sure you will have fun! Watch the parking situation at the faire - if I remember correctly, it could be quite a hike in - or arrive nice and early, and pay the $10 to park in preferred parking, which is right across from the gate. 
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Offline Rowan MacD

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Re: New to Renfests would love to go to one in costume where to begin?
« Reply #42 on: May 06, 2015, 02:02:25 PM »
  You can dress as anything you want to while going as a Patron;  Star Trek, Dr Who, Barbarians, you name it..How the paying Patrons want to dress is of little importance; as long as it's family friendly (rated PG) and your costume isn't a danger to anyone else.
 Personally, I went to faire for 3 years before I started going in garb. I dressed as a wench for my first 5 years, a pirate for 5 and finally graduated to Noble; which I still alternate with Celtic for hot weather. 
  The only people who have to dress period correct (or as nearly as possible) are cast and sometimes venders.

  Don't worry about 'fitting in' on your first few trips.   Dressing up is half the fun, and you don't have to obey any 'rules' if you don't want to.   Nobody is going to mock you. 
   Heck, you can go as Donald Duck and his Nephews if you want.  We have more video game and anime characters than anything anymore.  Just dress comfortably and enjoy yourselves at the shows.  Take the opportunity to shop and observe.

  As for pouches and bags-I used a plain suede 'messenger bag' style purse my first year in garb, until I could find a cheap pouch (which I still have).   I took off the purse decorations that looked modern, and voila! I had something secure to hold my wallet, camera, sunscreen and eye drops (for dust).
    Many faires do not allow weapons of any sort (even peace tied ones), so, before you invest in a nice sword or battle axe-check to see if it's OK to bring it in. 
   Note: Just because there are vendors who sell the aforementioned weapons on site, does NOT mean you are allowed to wear/carry them while at faire.  In this case-if you buy a weapon from an onsite vendor; you will have to pick it up at the gate as you leave.  You cannot bring it back in.
  For example: KCRF does not allow any weapons to be brought in by patrons. At all. Period.   I've seen them pitch a fit over an eating knife.  You will have to leave it in your car.  Only cast members are allowed to wear/carry weapons.
   
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Offline PollyPoPo

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Re: New to Renfests would love to go to one in costume where to begin?
« Reply #43 on: May 06, 2015, 09:14:54 PM »
Diaval, welcome to the world of Faires.

So, now you’re seeing the extent of your question and the diversity of ren garb.  Garb can run ridiculously expensive, even if one is not going noble.  Merchant class  garb for a man in Sunday clothes (as opposed to every day work clothes) is still going to cost quite a bit, especially for something a faire-goer only wears once or twice a year (you say you will only be making one weekend trip this year). 

As you have found, if one tries to be anywhere near historically accurate, it gets even more difficult to find something on-line.  Unless you can make your own, you will end up paying for the actual construction, at approximately 4 to 1 or 5 to 1.  If the materials cost $100, expect to pay $400-$500 for the finished garment. When you get up close, you will begin to see why it is called garb and not costumes.

You mention costumes and cosplay.  Garb is a whole different category.  Faires are outdoor events, so what works on-stage or in an exhibition hall might not last an hour outside.  Rather than thinking Halloween, compare men’s merchant class garb to buying a three-piece suit at a not-quite high-end men’s store.  A dress shirt at Brooks Bros will run about $100 for the lowest quality and then add 10% for the larger sizes.  A dress suit (pants and jacket) start about $500, but most run $1000, then add the extra for big guys.  (Can you guess we’ve got some big guys in our family?)

You have already found Renshirts.  I do have personal knowledge of their products.  They have a limited number of styles for men; not noble or even merchant class, but their clothing is very well made and will last.  It is cotton, machine washable, and wearable.  AND it will not cost you a fortune to get started.

Unlike many other stores, they do make shirts and pants that are actually sized to fit big and tall men (as in XXXL rather than a skimpy XL).  The shirts are made with a straight line from under arm to bottom.  They do not have the slits up the side like modern men’s dress shirts.   

The gauze shirts are definitely the cooler way to go, but the others have more “heft” to them.  The neck lacings (especially the leather ones) need to be removed when you wash the clothing, but otherwise it is wash and wear.  If you have very muscular lower legs, you might call them and ask for the actual measurement of the cuffed legs or go with the draw string ones.  (Also ask about hidden pockets – just a thought.) 

So, once you have a shirt and breeches, you can start adding.  First outing, wear one of your regular belts (or two or three to add more mass), fastened loosely to give it some droop if you can; add a piece of fabric knotted around the clasp and hanging down – tie it at the bottom to make it look like a pouch.  That will hide the modern look of the belt and break up the vertical mass of your appearance. Add a pair of leather sandals if you have them.   If you end up wearing running shoes, so be it.  Depending on your head (and hair or lack of it), you might want a hat as someone mentioned.  Just something to keep from getting burned.  Or get a big square of cloth, knot each of the ends and wear it like a sailor might when working in the sun.  Add a big gold hoop earring (either in your own pierced ear or a screw back from grandma’s box of costume jewelry) and you’ll make a passable pirate. 

Oh, and bring some kind of a big bag to carry stuff in, the knotted kind work or something that looks like a big canvas bag thrown over your shoulder.  With 8 year old boys, you’ll probably ending up carrying at least part of their booty around during the day.  And plastic baggies, a couple that are gallon size, to stash the partly eaten turkey leg they swear they are going to finish later.  You will need drinking water; some faires let you bring in your own; others sell it and frown on bringing your own.  Most larger faires do not allow outside food.

Keep in mind when you look at pictures that the basic garb of clothing is only the start.  If someone is wearing a hat, a belt, a pouch, shoes/boots, stockings, weapons, they probably did not buy it all at once before going to their first faire.  Expect to experience sticker shock, particularly on hats and boots.   

Once you are actually in a faire, you can decide if you still want to add to your garb right away or just make that first time a watching experience.  The odds are you’ll be coming back next year and the next and the next.
Polly PoPo
(aka Grannie)

Offline Diaval

  • R/F.com Member
  • Posts: 29
  • I love my wife, she's Maleficent
Re: New to Renfests would love to go to one in costume where to begin?
« Reply #44 on: May 06, 2015, 10:28:21 PM »
About the kilt.  Bristol is during July and August through Labor Day.  The usual summer temps range from the lower 90's to over 100 degrees, humidity between 90 to 95%.  On those days, my husband specifically wears his kilt with just a shirt.  Again, you wouldn't wear an expensive, 8 or 9 yards  wool kilt to faire, but judging from the huge amount of guys at Bristol wearing kilts when it's hot, it seems to be their go to choice for the weather.  Sure, an acrylic kilt is not wool, but even though it's acrylic, Steve finds it much cooler than wearing regular garb.

Well, it certainly doesn't get that hot up here in NY during September / October.  Sure you might have a rouge day in the upper 80's, but very rare it hits 90 late in the season.   Anyway, if the temperature got that high, I certainly wouldn't go that weekend.  I am amazed that you go out when it is that hot.  So the acrylic is cooler?

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It does kind of make you wonder why faire organizers hold Renfests in the dead heat of summer?   I don't get that part.  Don't they realize that the nature of the bulk of these costumes should dictate running fairs in cooler weather?

Because schools out.  :-)   That really is the entire reason.   

Normally that would be the case, but I have noticed that even in the summer, renfests primarily operated on the weekends and not during the week.

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Also, I don't want to completely discourage you from wearing a great kilt if you want - they do look wonderful when done correctly.  Just know they are wool and they are many, many yards of material.  Now, since most of your heat loss comes from your neck/shoulders/chest area, you might be okay with a kilt.   However, since you said heat was a problem, I wanted to make sure you understand what you are getting into.

Understood.  I am not sold on that style.  I just figured it might be an option.  But I do sweat most from the head and just above the stomach area and on the back more than the legs.

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Also, the more skin that is covered by hankyweight/lightweight material, the better you will be in the sun.  The reason people in the Middle East cover up isn't just religious - it's because lightweight material helps to create a natural sunscreen like barrier between you and the sun.  No sunburns!  Also, the material will help keep the sweat off of you.  You will be MUCH cooler with a long sleeves puffy white cotton or linen tunic/shift that with your regular t-shirt. 

Sounds great.   Yeah, that is another issue too being also fair skinned.  That is why the first thing I look for when scoping out a renfest site is trees and lots of them.  The more shade the better.

Thank You.

I don't think he is talking about wearing a great kilt.  We are talking about a $59 Econokilt, which would be fine, since the family is not going for historical accuracy, and at this point, price is a huge consideration.

Steve in Arizona last winter at 95 degrees in his kilt.


His outfit looks great.  I am about his size, but taller.   It is certainly a look I am going to take into consideration.  By the way, I saw your other outfits on Photobucket.   The all look great...amazing! 

This is another look I like on the both of you:

http://i38.photobucket.com/albums/e109/LadyReneeBuchanan/DSCN1551_zps7a1ba33f.jpg

Both yours and his outfits are great.   I love the sleeves and the overall look on your dress.  I could see my wife in that easily.   Did you make all of those outfits yourself? 

Wow! all those pictures are great food for thought.  I had fun just looking through them!

I understand and I mentioned modern kilts versus historically accurate kilts earlier. Still, if someone has heat problems, natural fibers are going to be the way to go (and are a good idea even without heat issues).   

Well, her husband seems to be around my size and she said that he was fine in 95 degree heat.  But, I am NOT going to go out to a fair on any day that is over 85.   Also I am not 100% sure I would go with the kilt.  I do like the look though.  But there are other looks I am taking a liking to as well.   But for the top I would like to ebb on the side of safety and go with a Linen or other natural fiber as the upper body is where I am prone to sweating.

The Malificent outfit was wonderful!!  Don't know about NYRF but she would fit in fine at any of the faires here in TX.  If you want the family to match that is great, but you don't have to.  My hubby always wears his barbarian/dwarf costume, my son is currently into knights tunics, and mine varies between fae, pirate, and gypsy depending on mood and weather.  Don't think we have ever been looked at strangely for it.  (If we were, I didn't notice!).

'Evenin'  Your highness.

Thank you very much.  Her Maleficent outfit was a labor of love.  Well, I think it wouldn't be a problem at NYRF because they DO have a 'Faerie Woods" section.   Also I have seen some people wearing some outlandish stuff already.  BUT by and large the bulk do wear period correct garb.  As for mixing and matching...I think that will happen anyway because I am sure my boys would want to go as something they are interested in.  Medieval peasant boys probably will not ring a bell with them.   I wouldn't be surprised if they go as pirates.  As for my wife, I did already ask her if she wants to go in her full Maleficent outfit, but she already said, 'No'.   While she was fine with her horns for 5 hours on Halloween, she certainly couldn't do the near 10 hours at the fair.  Besides if it is warm out, she wouldn't want to wear all that makeup either.   I could change her outfit up though because that dress you see, it is really a two piece. So she could wear that top and a different skirt.   Even so, even if I did get her a new outfit, I think I will have an easier time picking an outfit for her than for me.

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Most people get pouches that attach to belts to put your stuff in, you can find them all over the internet and at faire.  Prices vary greatly depending fabric, style, size, and intricacy.  Ladies can also use baskets or pouches with loops to hold on their wrist.  But, you may also be able to find some pants with pockets, they will most likely be covered by your tunic anyway and its a modern convenience that no one would bat an eye at.

I don't mind wearing a pouch, mainly that would be to 'hide' my camera, but a concealed pocket would be nice too for my wallet.   But now that you mention it, I would need something for my wife too.   Luckily she wouldn't be carrying too much as she normally has a fanny pack when we go out to places like a fair or amusement park.  So the medieval equivalent of a fanny pack would do the trick.

You already have lots of advice, but a little bit more!

For you - Shirt in 100% cotton or 100% linen. Loose baggy pants (modern is fine to start) or kilt, belt with pouch to hold the necessities.  HAT (trust me - hats are your friends!) - look for a straw hat, or make that your first purchase of the day. Footwear is usually expensive, so stick with whatever you have to be comfortable in.

Yes, this does sound like a good plan.  Yes, I would like a hat as well.  I like the ones Lady Renee's husband has.

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For your wife - Shirt in 100% cotton or 100% linen. Bodice (which is the female top - sometimes boned - likely best to get this at faire to ensure fit. Long, loose skirt - or layer 2. HAT. Footwear as you find it. (Under floor length skirts, your feet are not as visible.)

My wife prefers long skirts, but my concern with something that is floor length is the horror of having her dress drag along the ground.  So I would like to go with something a little higher than that.   But she does have boots because she wore them with her Maleficent outfit.  They just are not tall boots.  They go a bit above the ankle.

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For the kids - Pants or shorts, plus a shirt. For a pirate look, add a sash, a bandana and a hat.  For a knight look, procure a tunic, and a helmet. Or leave the accessories off, and let them pick what they like at faire. >>

This I am rethinking and I think I am going to let them dress up as they see that appeals to them.  But more then likely I know they would probably pick being a pirate.  I will have to ask them to feel out more what they want to do.

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I'm sure you will have fun! Watch the parking situation at the faire - if I remember correctly, it could be quite a hike in - or arrive nice and early, and pay the $10 to park in preferred parking, which is right across from the gate. 

Thank you.  Yeah I did hear about that with the NYRF faire in that it is a good walk to the front gate, unless you use the paid parking, which I probably will do because we will be walking around enough within the fair grounds

  .... The only people who have to dress period correct (or as nearly as possible) are cast and sometimes venders.


Yes, this was something I misread earlier in regards to wearing something that is not period correct.  I thought it meant all, but in reality it was meant for the vendors and performers and not the patrons.   That being said,  I even seen a video in which someone showed up to a Renfest as a Klingon.   All was good though because  he fit right in with the Orcs and Goblins.   

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  Don't worry about 'fitting in' on your first few trips.   Dressing up is half the fun, and you don't have to obey any 'rules' if you don't want to.   Nobody is going to mock you.

I hope not!

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   Heck, you can go as Donald Duck and his Nephews if you want.  We have more video game and anime characters than anything anymore.  Just dress comfortably and enjoy yourselves at the shows.  Take the opportunity to shop and observe.

Oh yeah, I have seen the Final Fantasy and Kingdom Hearts types in some of the renfest videos.

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  As for pouches and bags-I used a plain suede 'messenger bag' style purse my first year in garb, until I could find a cheap pouch (which I still have).   I took off the purse decorations that looked modern, and voila! I had something secure to hold my wallet, camera, sunscreen and eye drops (for dust).

Well for me I just need something that attaches to a belt.  Probably the same would be for my wife as she is used to wearing fanny packs out, so as I said above, I just need the medieval equivalent to the fanny pack.

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    Many faires do not allow weapons of any sort (even peace tied ones), so, before you invest in a nice sword or battle axe-check to see if it's OK to bring it in.
   Note: Just because there are vendors who sell the aforementioned weapons on site, does NOT mean you are allowed to wear/carry them while at faire.  In this case-if you buy a weapon from an onsite vendor; you will have to pick it up at the gate as you leave.  You cannot bring it back in.
  For example: KCRF does not allow any weapons to be brought in by patrons. At all. Period.   I've seen them pitch a fit over an eating knife.  You will have to leave it in your car.  Only cast members are allowed to wear/carry weapons.
   

Yes, I have looked into this already for the NYRF and they do allow peace tied weapons.  Now, I don't know how one would peace tie a battle-axe!  LOL!   Not that I would be going that route anyway.   At any rate, if I choose a weapon it would most likely be an inexpensive costume weapon such as a short sword or dagger.   One of those that are made of real metal, but have a dulled blade, and appropriately tie that to the costume.  As it is, my son's are only 8 years old and I certainly don't want them getting a hold of something like that...even if it is fake.

Well all,

Thank you for the information.   As of now I mostly want to see pictures of various looks and then match that up to the advice here.

Have a good evening!

Diaval.
Exit Light, Enter Night, Take My Hand, We're Off To Never Never Land.

 

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