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Author Topic: Beginner Archery  (Read 16888 times)

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Offline Tammy

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Beginner Archery
« on: January 27, 2009, 07:48:24 PM »
I've done a google search for beginner bows, but I'm not really finding anything I like. So, I was wondering if someone here could give me a clue.

My dad knows abit about archery, and he said I probably could draw about 35 pounds. I'm 5'4", so dad says long bows are too long.
I like the look of the long bows and the recurves. I think compounds are too modern looking.

Any help, suggestions, and links would be great!!!
Thanks.
Royal Protector of Raccoons, Mistress of the Poi, Best Friend of Windland/Nim, Guppy, Seamstress for The Feisty Lady.

Offline Chris B

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Re: Beginner Archery
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2009, 07:15:44 AM »
It really depends on how much you will actually use the bow.  35# may seem like a light draw weight, BUT if your going to be shooting for hours at a time, even that 35# can take its toll.  Even men use much lighter draw weights for competing in archery than they would for hunting, etc.  35# is roughly the upper weight women use for Olympic Archery to my understanding.

With a compound, you get some "let off" of the draw weight when the cams (wheels on the top and bottom edge of the limbs) roll over at maximum draw so it easy to anchor and hold the weight for the shot.  A recurve on the other hand will have you anchoring and holding the full draw weight of the bow while you take the shot.  It would be far better to go with a better bow at a lower weight you can handle than to buy a higher weight that you will struggle to hold. 

First, you need to figure out your draw length.  Basically, it is the length between your nock and the arrow rest when fully drawn.  That will determine what size bow you need.  Recurves are available pretty much anywhere that sells Archery equipment.  I would start with an inexpensive bow and then graduate to a better one if you really love it.  Even a recurve can get upwards of $1,000 or more for the riser and limbs.  Just do some research on brands and read reviews of the various bows.  Better yet, get to an archery shop and look at various makes.  PSE, Hoyt, Browning, etc. are all good bows. 

I use a 75# PSE Compound for hunting, but am eyeing Grozer bows for a more traditionally made recurve or Crimean/Tartar bow.  If you want to spend a little money and get a traditional bow, check them out.

http://www.grozerarchery.com/index_m.htm
« Last Edit: January 28, 2009, 07:26:34 AM by Chris B »

Offline Cormac

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Re: Beginner Archery
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2009, 10:33:30 AM »
If you have a good traditional archery store in your area this would be the best place to start.  You will need to determine your draw length.  An archery shop will have a bow set up that makes it easy, but you can also do it in other ways.  One is to take your arms and put them out if front of you with palms together.  Place a yard stick so that it is touching your chest and measure where your fingers touch the yard stick.

A recurve or a reflex/deflex bow might be a good choice for you.  They are both more compact than a long bow and because of their design give the arrow a little more "snap" even with a lighter draw weight.

Whatever you go with make sure to pick up a shooting glove and a good arm guard.  I have seen some nasty welts as people learn good shooting form.

Offline Dinobabe

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Re: Beginner Archery
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2009, 11:47:19 AM »
Or search antique stores for someone's old Boy Scout bow!  That's where I found mine for $15 (it's about 4').  Fiberglass but looks pretty good for wood.  I wrapped the plastic handle in thin leather.  It works great and I estimate it to be 15 pounds.  I used it a Bristol for years.  And get the guards, I took out a chunk of my finger when I was about 10!  :-X
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Offline SirRichardBear

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Re: Beginner Archery
« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2009, 11:52:24 AM »
If you plan on shooting at your local faire check with the people running the archery booth many do not allow you to shot your own bows.  Of the ones that do most will not allow recurve or modern bows.  You shouldn't have a problem with either a stright or long bow, #25 pull is a good fun choice for shooting paper but be sure to get arrows wieghted for you bow.  I second the importance of getting a shooting glove and a good fitting bracer.

http://www.3riversarchery.com/ is a good source they also have good books for the beginner.

Archery For Beginners Classic Archery Book

Archery for Beginners, was originally published in 1904, then re-printed in 1935 re-publication by a lady archer, Miss Philips, of Ivy Lodge. This re-print was made specifically with the female archer and the beginner in mind. Miss Philips, having been exposed as a young girl to an early edition of Colonel Walrond's book in her father's library, recognized the need for a simple book of instruction. She requested permission from the Walrond family to re-publish the Colonel's work thereby providing an affordable beginner's handbook. One of the most engaging aspects of this handsome booklet is the unorthodox use of animatograph photography to accurately show the physical stages of drawing the bow. Colonel Walrond himself was the subject of these intriguing photographs.

I've also had good dealings with Kee's Archery http://www.keestraditions.com/

Good luck and welcome to the ranks.  Few things are as fun as shooting with friends in friendly competition.  If your ever at Scarby look me up we have a great group of archers here
« Last Edit: January 28, 2009, 12:00:53 PM by SirRichardBear »
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Offline Var Greyshadow

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Re: Beginner Archery
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2009, 07:10:23 AM »
Long bows are NOT too long.  I'm 5' 3" and I shoot a 35# longbow just fine. Since there's no arrow rest, you have to angle the bow, which cuts down the length quite a bit.  Before that, I used an old Ben Pearson recurve that a friend gave me.  That one is about 4 or 4.5 feet long unstrung and is quite traditional-looking.  It's not one of those recurves with the big notch for the arrow. 

Kee's is a good source.  I talked to her at LARF.  She's not very tall either, so she could probably give you some good ideas.
"All that is gold does not glitter; Not all those who wander are lost..." ~J.R.R. Tolkien "The Fellowship of the Ring"

Offline Tammy

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Re: Beginner Archery
« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2009, 05:51:23 PM »
Thanks everyone for all the help!!
Royal Protector of Raccoons, Mistress of the Poi, Best Friend of Windland/Nim, Guppy, Seamstress for The Feisty Lady.

Offline Tim T

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Re: Beginner Archery
« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2009, 07:00:28 PM »
One more place for you to check:
http://woodbows.com/index.html

They have rough and ready english style long bows with a draw of 25-30 lbs for $50.  I have one that I plan on finishing in the next month or so.  They have a great rustic look and shoot well.

If you want to pay a bit more, they have fancier bows as well.

Happy huntin'.
Tim
aka Dark'n M'Crack of Clan M'Crack/Clan White

Offline Tammy

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Re: Beginner Archery
« Reply #8 on: January 30, 2009, 08:38:14 PM »
Thanks Tim! That's more in my price range for starting out!!!

I love how helpful everyone is on this forum!! Thanks!!!!!
Royal Protector of Raccoons, Mistress of the Poi, Best Friend of Windland/Nim, Guppy, Seamstress for The Feisty Lady.

Offline Cormac

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Re: Beginner Archery
« Reply #9 on: January 31, 2009, 07:30:51 AM »
You may want to check ebay for wood bows also.  I just purchased one for my daughter and it was around $40 with shipping.  It was unfinished so we stained it mahogony and rubbed it down with vasaline.  The handle was just a tape wrap so we leather wrapped it. It looks good and shoots really good for such an economical bow.

I have a bow from woodbows.com also and have shot it for about 4 years now.  It is starting to develop some string follow and will be retired as soon as I have a set of arrows for my new bow.

You can also find arrows on ebay for about $20 for a set of 6.  I picked up a set and they are plain, but practical.  They shoot good and I don't get bent out of shape if they get dinged up.

All this archery talk is going to have me at the range tomorrow morning.

Offline anne of oaktower

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Re: Beginner Archery
« Reply #10 on: January 31, 2009, 09:44:27 AM »
I am so glad I stumbled across this thread!  I've been wanting to get into archery for a couple of years now, but hadn't found an economical "beginners" bow.  I'll be ordering soon  ;D
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Offline Hoowil

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Re: Beginner Archery
« Reply #11 on: March 07, 2009, 10:57:13 AM »
Its been probably 15 years since I've drawn a bow, but I do remember a couple things.
I would definitely look for a local archery store. We used to have one around here that had an inside range behind the store, and would rent equipment for newbies/part time hobbyists. If you can find a place like that, if they still exist, you should be able to explain that you want to learn, and your thoughts on what you want to do. Then they can set you up with a couple rigs, and let you try them out so that you can get a real feel for each one. Even if it means more time and searching, the live experience from that before any purchase would be worth it.

Ah, but I do miss my old longbow... I'll have to hunt down some gear when the kids are old enough...
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Offline Pascal

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Re: Beginner Archery
« Reply #12 on: March 07, 2009, 06:12:38 PM »
Rose City Archery at http://www.rosecityarchery.com/ is another good source for reasonably priced wood (cedar) arrows.

Offline Tammy

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Re: Beginner Archery
« Reply #13 on: March 07, 2009, 07:18:24 PM »
Thanks for that idea Hoowil! Pascal...I'll be checking that link out soon.

I'm glad others are posting on this thread.
Royal Protector of Raccoons, Mistress of the Poi, Best Friend of Windland/Nim, Guppy, Seamstress for The Feisty Lady.

Offline Robert eben Hope

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Re: Beginner Archery
« Reply #14 on: March 29, 2009, 09:16:45 PM »
I just started getting into traditional archery and I'll pass along the same advice that was given to me from a friend.

First try to find a place were you can try a few different bows out, you don't even need to shoot them just get a feel for them and see what fits your hand best.

Second find out your max draw wieght, you can do this by shooting at a faire and trying out a few different bows. Then buy your first bows at least 5 pounds lighter.

Your first bow should be easy for you to shoot repeatedly. The reason  is that you need to master the basics and get the form part down first. After you have perfected your form you can upgrade to a heavier bow if you want or just keep stay with a lighter bow. But the most important thing is learning good form.

 

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