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Market Square => Renaissance Art => Topic started by: DonaCatalina on March 31, 2009, 11:37:05 AM

Title: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: DonaCatalina on March 31, 2009, 11:37:05 AM
I don't remember seeing this portrait before. Much more extensive use of browns than I'm used to.

(http://images.virtualology.com/images/536.jpg)
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: DonaCatalina on April 02, 2009, 09:56:15 AM
This one is said to be Jane Dormer.
Her dress looks very Spanish to me
(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2503/3762894193_097faae234.jpg)
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: DonaCatalina on October 01, 2010, 09:04:42 AM
I'm beginning to think that Brown was much more popular circa 1550 that was usually believed.
Brown for peasants only may be one of those renfaire myths.
(http://www.shafe.co.uk/crystal/images/lshafe/Mor_Mary_Tudor_1554_Prado.jpg)
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: DonaCatalina on October 01, 2010, 09:19:31 AM
Margarethe of Parma.
This is a portrait that was done late in the artist's life when many of his subjects were at the Imperial Court in Austria.
(http://images.artnet.com/WebServices/picture.aspx?date=20081112&catalog=149917&gallery=111061&lot=01006&filetype=2)
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: DonaCatalina on October 03, 2010, 08:43:15 AM
Cardinal Granville's dwarf and dog. The only one in this picture who looks happy is the dog. Can you imagine what kind of like this man had?
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_rlbkVRdQg0w/SgNuuMyDlqI/AAAAAAAACVU/XELAaTT6_vo/s400/cardinals.jpg)
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: Anna Iram on October 03, 2010, 05:43:23 PM
Elizabeth wore brown....and lots of beading. I love the colors of this portrait, though it almost seems paintings of her were reworked over and over, like a paper doll, until one doesn't even know what the actual gown looked like.

*Viewed in Gallery II*
http://historymedren.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/elizface.htm

(http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l142/Marianna00/elizabettes.jpg)
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: DonaCatalina on October 04, 2010, 06:10:00 AM
I agree- especially later paintings of Elizabeth are very stylized. Though I gather that showing her true age would have been frowned upon so painters avoided painting her as she actually looked.
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: DonaCatalina on October 04, 2010, 02:33:53 PM
This one is titled Lady of the Hapsbourg Cour. You have to wonder how it felt to have all those pearls in her hair.
(http://www.portrait-renaissance.fr/Expertise/Images/expertise_008_g.jpg)
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: DonaCatalina on October 04, 2010, 02:36:53 PM
This painting has been identofied as Mary I Tudor when she was much younger.
I'd like to find this one in color.
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3608/3661450838_652d2f8801.jpg)
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: Anna Iram on October 04, 2010, 03:42:41 PM
I like her smile in that picture. Very pretty.

Okay, so I got off aon a tangent with my last post and missed the point of the thread.  :D Sorry Dona.

I like this gentleman. A man of principles

William of Orange aka William the Silent as painted by Antonis Mor 1555

From the Wiki:

William I, Prince of Orange (24 April 1533 – 10 July 1584), also widely known as William the Silent (Dutch: Willem de Zwijger), or simply William of Orange (Dutch: Willem van Oranje), was the main leader of the Dutch revolt against the Spanish that set off the Eighty Years' War and resulted in the formal independence of the United Provinces in 1648. He was born in the House of Nassau as Count of Nassau-Dillenburg. He became Prince of Orange in 1544 and is thereby the founder of the branch House of Orange-Nassau.

A wealthy nobleman, William originally served the Habsburgs as a member of the court of Margaret of Parma, governor of the Spanish Netherlands. Unhappy with the centralisation of political power away from the local estates and with the Spanish persecution of Dutch Protestants, William joined the Dutch uprising and turned against his former masters. The most influential and politically capable of the rebels, he led the Dutch to several successes in the fight against the Spanish. Declared an outlaw by the Spanish king in 1580, he was assassinated by Balthasar Gérard (also written as 'Gerardts') in Delft four years later


(http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l142/Marianna00/465px-Antonio_Moro_-_Willem_I_van_Nassau.jpg)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_I_of_Orange
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: DonaCatalina on October 05, 2010, 04:58:08 AM
I like her smile in that picture. Very pretty.

Okay, so I got off aon a tangent with my last post and missed the point of the thread.  :D Sorry Dona.


Actually I thought you were doing a comparison.  ;)
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: DonaCatalina on October 06, 2010, 09:46:18 AM
Anna of Austria, Queen of Spain. The single glove intrigues me. I'm sure it had some significance at the time.
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/df/Anthonis_Mor_007.jpg)
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: DonaCatalina on October 08, 2010, 10:22:58 AM
Sir Henry Lee.
Depending on who is doing the interpreting, the ring on the cord symbolizes love, friendship (http://www.npg.org.uk/research/programmes/making-art-in-tudor-britain/case-studies/matb-case-study-9.php), loyalty and so on into erotic usages. (https://www.tate.org.uk/tateetc/issue7/prisonersoflove.htm)
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_aHFaOMn3YPU/TFY7Jc0QZLI/AAAAAAAAAIc/UnNbP76UOqQ/s1600/hen+lee.jpg)
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: Anna Iram on October 08, 2010, 10:35:27 AM
I love the symbology in paintings such as this. The dog as a symbol of loyalty or this rather overt, and yes, slightly erotic gesture. The use of ermine as a sign of purity as well as that of a lady dipping her fingertips in a bowl of water.  :) I like these touches.

Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: Welsh Wench on October 08, 2010, 07:18:31 PM
Cardinal Granville's dwarf and dog. The only one in this picture who looks happy is the dog. Can you imagine what kind of like this man had?

That portrait hangs in the Louvre.

So I did a bit of research.....

Cardinal Granvelle was also painted by Titian but the portrait by Mors of his dwarf and the dog (which is a mastiff} was more famous than any picture of Granvelle himself.
And it initiated a Spanish tradition of painting court dwarfs.

At one time a dwarf was considered a necessity of every noble family. The Roman Emperors all had their dwarfs. And it was the fashion of the time that dwarfs were noted for their wit and wisdom.
The Court dwarfs were allowed unlimited freedom of speech, and in order to get at truths other men were afraid to utter, one of the Kings of Denmark made one of his dwarfs Prime Minister.

Catherine de Medici had three couples of dwarfs.
In England and in Spain the nobles had the portraits of their dwarfs painted by the celebrated artists of the day. Velasquez has represented Don Antonio el Ingles, a dwarf of fine appearance, with a large dog, probably to bring out the dwarf's inferior height. This artist also painted a great number of other dwarfs at the Court of Spain, and in one of his paintings he portrays the Infanta Marguerite accompanied by her male and female dwarfs.

Bottom line is it might not have been so bad to be a 'little person' if you got to play the Big House!


Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: DonaCatalina on October 11, 2010, 10:21:40 AM
Thanks Wenchie, that was very interesting.
Now this portait by Antonis Mor looks to be fairly typical until you look closely at the woman's face.
Does the cleft chin and hint of a moustache mean this was a male model dressed up in women's clothes?
(http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/citi/images/standard/WebLarge/WebImg_000004/39489_361541.jpg)
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: Adriana Rose on October 11, 2010, 07:30:32 PM
It could have been a portrait of an actor.
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: DonaCatalina on October 12, 2010, 09:47:31 AM
Vespasiano Gonzaga just barely wears armor in this portrait, as opposed to other protraits wearing almost a complete set.
Did he run out of money? Or was he more interested in showing off his clothes?
(gotta love that codpiece)
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fb/Vespasiano_Gonzaga.jpg)
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: Welsh Wench on October 12, 2010, 01:00:49 PM

(gotta love that codpiece)

Oh dear...now that is a confident man!

Or optimistic.
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: DonaCatalina on October 15, 2010, 10:35:54 AM
Peter Ernst I von Mansfeld-Vorderort (20 July 1517 – 22 May 1604) was an army commander and Governor of the Spanish Netherlands from 1592 to 1594.
His clothing contains so much gold embroidery its hard to tell where armor ends and cloth begins.
(he is apparently lacking in optimism also according to Wenchie's definition)  ;)
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/53/PeterErnstIvonMansfeldVorderort.jpg)
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: DonaCatalina on October 19, 2010, 07:23:29 AM
Fernando Álvarez de Toledo tercer Duque de Alba. Yes, he was Eleanor de Toledo's uncle.
In this painting, Anonis Mor departs from other works and really focuses more on the full suit enamaled and gilded armor. Barely any fabric is visible.
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3147/2621504178_84e9bb23cf_z.jpg?zz=1)
(my favorite brandy is named after him)
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: DonaCatalina on October 22, 2010, 08:59:31 AM
Not a dwarf- but another look at a court jester.
The work is listed in the 1600 inventory of Madrid's Alcazar Palace as “Pejerón, the madman of the Count of Benavente, with white stockings and jerkin and a deck of cards in his right hand.” It was kept in the Treasury.
Mor probably made this work during his last visit to Spain in 1559. The jester appears full-length, standing, with a dark background and no spatial references. As he occupies all available space in the foreground, it is difficult to know his true height. He is sumptuously dressed in courtly clothing, and only his large head, short legs and deformed hand —the cards it holds symbolize leisure— bear witness to his condition and occupation, “the art of jest.”
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d2/Pejeron_Mor.jpg/303px-Pejeron_Mor.jpg)
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: DonaCatalina on November 01, 2010, 09:22:09 AM
Portrait of Maria de Portogallo.
The face on this one has always struck me as oddly colored. But the gold bullion embroidery is finely detailed.
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/32/Bottega_di_Anthonis_Mor_-_Ritratto_di_Maria_di_Portogallo.jpg)
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: operafantomet on November 01, 2010, 09:38:15 AM
Earrings galore!
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: Anna Iram on November 01, 2010, 02:53:30 PM
Beautiful trim work. Reminds me a bit of a gold version of the trim Anea used on her blue gown.

Now isn't that earring style unexpected!? Where does that come from?
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: operafantomet on November 02, 2010, 12:32:39 PM
Beautiful trim work. Reminds me a bit of a gold version of the trim Anea used on her blue gown.

Now isn't that earring style unexpected!? Where does that come from?

If I remember correctly, it was only on the Iberic peninsula (Spain, Portugal) they were crazy about multiple earrings like that. Michaela de Bruce ( http://costumes.glittersweet.com/ ), who has done excellent research on Spanish 16th century style, once wrote about it and showed different examples. But 5 rings? Wow...
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: Adriana Rose on November 09, 2010, 05:46:18 PM
She looks like she had some sun before she sat for the portrait.

This may be a silly question but would the embrodery be real gold treads or just something that looks like gold? Judging by the jewels on her necklace she was rather wealthy.
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: Anna Iram on November 09, 2010, 06:45:26 PM
I was just reading Dona's post in "bowing to royalty". This lady was no doubt one of the "blue blooded" nobles she spoke of. Proud to be so fair and of pure blood.
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: Rowan MacD on November 09, 2010, 06:54:02 PM
Beautiful trim work. Reminds me a bit of a gold version of the trim Anea used on her blue gown.

Now isn't that earring style unexpected!? Where does that come from?
   Love the earrings, I don't recall any other portraits featuring that many rings!
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: DonaCatalina on November 10, 2010, 04:57:18 AM
She looks like she had some sun before she sat for the portrait.

This may be a silly question but would the embrodery be real gold treads or just something that looks like gold? Judging by the jewels on her necklace she was rather wealthy.
One version of gold bullion used for embroidery was very thin gold wrapped around a silk thread. This is similar to the method for creating cloth of gold or gold shot silk. So yes it could be real gold, but I am not an embroidery expert so it could be one of several other techniques.
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: DonaCatalina on November 18, 2010, 08:04:37 AM
Potrait of a man in armor. This one is at the Getty. I wish I could find a better copy so you could see the detail of the embroidered sleeve cuffs and the slops with matching codpiece. With such red curly hair, I do wonder who this was. He doesn't look Flemish to my eye.
(http://www.getty.edu/art/collections/images/l/00078901.jpg)
Title: Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
Post by: DonaCatalina on December 07, 2010, 10:38:31 AM
Potrait dated circa 1560-1565.
Known simply as Man pointing to a table clock. Located in the Louvre.
(http://cartelen.louvre.fr/pub/fr/image/10809_p0005734.001.jpg)
(http://imagecache5.art.com/p/LRG/15/1508/5U5BD00Z/antonis-mor-portrait-of-a-man-from-the-retinue-of-cardinal-granvelle.jpg)