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The Squire's Tavern => Squire's Tavern => Topic started by: DonaCatalina on April 24, 2009, 08:29:39 AM

Title: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: DonaCatalina on April 24, 2009, 08:29:39 AM
Since the weather is truning decidedly warmer It's probably time to discuss heatstroke.
First and foremost don't push yourself too hard and drink plenty of water.

Heat stroke is a form of hyperthermia, an abnormally elevated body temperature with accompanying physical and neurological symptoms. Unlike heat cramps and heat exhaustion, two forms of hyperthermia that are less severe, heat stroke is a true medical emergency that can be fatal if not properly and promptly treated.

Symptoms of heat stroke can sometimes mimic those of heart attack or other conditions. Sometimes a person experiences symptoms of heat exhaustion before progressing to heat strokes.

Symptoms of heat exhaustion include:

nausea,

vomiting,

fatigue,

weakness,

headache,

muscle cramps and aches, and

dizziness.
=============================================================
Cooling measures that may be effective include:

cool, non-alcoholic, non-carbonated beverages, as directed by your physician

rest

cool shower, bath, or sponge bath

an air-conditioned environment

Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Dinobabe on April 24, 2009, 10:13:04 AM
EXCELLENT adivice!  Thank you DonaCatalina.
Let's not let anyone get that far.  Always be on the look out for early symptons in yourself and others.  And as stated drink water, rest, and take advantage of the front seat at the Washing Well Wenches show! ;)
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Queen Bonnie on April 24, 2009, 11:48:32 AM
 It is also not good to not eat when it is hot. Try to eat a little something light and easily digested. Drink lots of water.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Adriana Rose on April 24, 2009, 12:26:42 PM
WATER WATER WATER!! alcohol does NOT count!

Shade too! parasols are pretty and very functonal!

For my crew at my shop I keep some gatoraide for them to drink, it has all the goodies that your body needs.  If you cant take a bottle of gatoraide those Emergan-C packets fit in your pouch really nicely. That has the same kinda stuff that gatoraide has

We also have found when you are in a pinch the pickle guy is willing to part with a tankard of juice. Its a great pick me up!

And remember passing out because you overheat is NOT fun!
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Trillium on April 24, 2009, 03:30:12 PM
Alcohol is a big no-no!
Drink lots of cool water, but not too cold.  Flooding your body with ice water when you are on the verge of a heat sickness can send you into shock.
Also, eating something salty will help you feel better as you will sweat all the salt out of your body.  Pickles, chips, etc. will be a huge help.
Don't overdress and avoid  man-made fabrics (polyester, nylon, etc..)
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Var Greyshadow on April 24, 2009, 03:36:05 PM
Ice cubes on the wrists are good for a quick cool-down.  I've been known to shove a few up under my bracers.  It helps some.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Muffin on April 24, 2009, 03:40:09 PM
Water, Water, Water!! I know I am one to forget to mix in a few bottles of water during a faire day! (and no Sitara my beer does not count as water.. *ppbbbttt* :P)

A bodice chiller can be a wench's best friend!! Even better if you can find a pirate to run off in the heat to refill the ice for you!!  :-*

If I feel like I am getting close to fainting I try to find a rag I can dip in cold water and drape around my neck for a bit and sit in the shade, this usually brings me back around..
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Sitara on April 24, 2009, 04:53:55 PM
I don't know about that Muffin.  Pretty sure light beer is water with yellow food coloring in it!

I like to use ice or a cold wash cloth on the wrists, neck and back of knees.  It also helps to remove your footwear or wear sandals.  Hiding in the walk-in cooler is nice but a tad overwhelming to go from 98 degree heat to a 40 degree cooler.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Celtic_Fae on April 24, 2009, 05:25:33 PM
Those migraine patches they sell at CVS and the like also help. I tried them out the last weekend, and between the cool and the menthol scent, it kept me from fading off under all my court garb. Plus, you can stick them in a cooler and then stick them on under your clothes with no one being any the wiser.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: tcindie on April 24, 2009, 06:23:43 PM
I drink a mug or two of pickle juice interspersed with water all day on the scorchers.. the salt in the pickle brine ensures that you'll keep absorbing the water. It takes a little getting used to, but it's an easy solution :)
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: GirlChris on April 24, 2009, 06:30:43 PM
Oooo... I'll just stick to eating the ginormous pickles, thanks. And pretzels. And kettle corn!

Dangit... now I want kettle corn...

Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Sitara on April 24, 2009, 07:45:03 PM
Pickle juice is also a great hangover remedy.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: cowgrrl on April 24, 2009, 09:49:04 PM
One of the guys last year at faire recommended alternating Gatorade & water or drinking a 50/50 mix of Gatorade & water.  I prefer Gatorade to water but make myself alternate which actually means I drink more because I suck down the water so I can have more Gatorade.  I believe you can get little packets of electrolyte flavoring to add to bottled water. 
Most faires I know will give you a cup of water if you ask so ask frequently!
Also, & this may get me banned from the boards  ;) but when its really hot I plan on not going garbed or dressing as a bellydancer rather than something that requires my bodice.  I know my limits & respect them. 
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: SirRichardBear on April 24, 2009, 10:27:13 PM
I put a couple of piece of ice in my scottish bonnet below the fold its helps keep the head cool.  Have to be careful about placement so it doesn't get to cold or drips down the neck.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Master James on April 27, 2009, 03:07:02 PM
Being on cast at VARF and a member of court, its a daily battle to avoid being overheated.  I have however found something that works great in helping to keep one cool: http://www.50degree.com/custom/index.cfm?ID=37974  I wear a tall hat and simply own 2 of these little beauties with velcro on them and in the hat.  They can be recharged in ice water in about 10 minutes or so.  Put one in the hat and because its velcroed in it won't fall out or hit your head but its like your personal a/c in there.  Even on brutal days it stays cool for a while.  A typical day in the 80-95 degree day, it stays cool for about 2-3 hours.  On a brutal day of 95+ and that includes the 2 days we had last year at 110+, they lasted about an hour.  These are not the end all be all to avoid overheating but they sure do help and are easily hidden in the hat.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: VIII on April 27, 2009, 03:30:44 PM
Super-hydrate during the week.  I start drinking more water starting on Wednesday.  During dehydration, if your body runs out of water, it starts sucking it out of your cells, which is highly damaging to your entire system.  Super-hydration 'plumps' your body down to the cellular level.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Robin Starveling on April 27, 2009, 10:41:18 PM
Definately drink a lot of water.  Definately eat something so you can retain that water.  Make sure not to drink too much water.  You can over hydrate, and from the people I've talked to who have done it, it's pretty painful too.  Listen to your body!
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Dayna on April 28, 2009, 05:41:54 PM
cool: http://www.50degree.com/custom/index.cfm?ID=37974 

These are All Over Bristol thanks to a friend of mine who found them a few years ago.  Stuff one down your bodice and one on each side over your kidneys.  Even once they unthaw, they still pull heat off you.

Dayna
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: brier patch charlie on April 29, 2009, 09:28:18 PM
I can tell you all, having a heat stroke is not fun. I had one two years ago in June of 07 while I was at my summer AT at Camp Robinson, and I spent 4 days in the hospital. And I had been drinking water, over a quart an hour, but due to the heat and high humidity, I was sweatting it out quicker than I was getting it in. Now I can not handle the heat if it's over 70 I'm hot and sweating like a field hand. I was very lucky, I didn't pass out and my kidneys didn't shut down, came close. Heat stroke is very real and you need to watch your self and others around you at fair if your going to be out in the heat.
This  why I would like to have fairs when the weather is cool or cold, just can't take the heat.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: will paisley on May 14, 2009, 05:23:35 PM
Being on cast at VARF and a member of court, its a daily battle to avoid being overheated.  I have however found something that works great in helping to keep one cool: http://www.50degree.com/custom/index.cfm?ID=37974  I wear a tall hat and simply own 2 of these little beauties with velcro on them and in the hat.  They can be recharged in ice water in about 10 minutes or so.  Put one in the hat and because its velcroed in it won't fall out or hit your head but its like your personal a/c in there.  Even on brutal days it stays cool for a while.  A typical day in the 80-95 degree day, it stays cool for about 2-3 hours.  On a brutal day of 95+ and that includes the 2 days we had last year at 110+, they lasted about an hour.  These are not the end all be all to avoid overheating but they sure do help and are easily hidden in the hat.

I am definitely going to have to look into those.  They look a lot less clumsy than the ice packs I've been using, which have to be refrozen to be of any use once they've melted.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: blackflowers18 on May 27, 2009, 09:41:06 PM
It should that they can be recharged in ice water in about 10 minutes or so.?



_________________
Ge mwf (http://www.filter-outlet.com/product.php?product=113699)
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Dayna on May 28, 2009, 06:09:00 PM
Yes, ice cold water, or water with a few ice cubes in it is enough to turn them solid again Very Quickly, I'd say not even 10 minutes, but I could be mistaken.  They're not so cold that they shock the body like a frozen gel pack does.  I've got several, and keep swapping them out throughout the day.

Dayna
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: BazookaBaby on May 29, 2009, 11:34:36 AM
Forgive me if this has already been asked - can those packs be bought in a store or do they have to be purchased off the website? If you bought them in person, where did you find them at?

Thanks!

Stephanie C.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Dayna on May 29, 2009, 04:26:33 PM
Website only, I don't know of a store, but you could check the website.

Dayna
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Mistress Cherry on May 29, 2009, 06:51:24 PM
I managed to pass out my very first day as cast on the Ren Faire.

Getting stripped and covered in ice by half a dozen strangers while crying in a panic is NOT the best end to a day, I can tell you.

The biggest problem? I had no idea when it started. After it was over I realized I'd been behaving as though drunk since about noon, slurring my speech and all. By the end of the day I was freezing and felt awful. Thought I was coming down with something. "Well, maybe I haven't eaten enough today?" So I sat at a table and ate several handfuls of beef jerky. By the time anyone else asked me what was wrong I was way too far gone.

I had been drinking all day, but not enough. I was sweating under three layers (though I was peasantry so it wasn't like it was velvet), and aspirating way more water than I realized. If you are performing, the sheer act of projecting your voice will dehydrate you.

So, yeah, they covered me in ice and floated an orange in a cup of water and kept forcing me to drink more and more. The jerky came back up (a level of gross I never want to repeat), and I felt much better.

I didn't lose it again until the end of the season, when I had a laughing fit of embarrassment and my bodice was too tight.

You don't want this to be you. Trust me.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Leyla on May 31, 2009, 09:18:34 AM
I drink a mug or two of pickle juice interspersed with water all day on the scorchers.. the salt in the pickle brine ensures that you'll keep absorbing the water. It takes a little getting used to, but it's an easy solution :)

That sounds backwards. Drinking salt leads to dehydration.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: KeeperoftheBar on May 31, 2009, 09:27:17 AM
I drink a mug or two of pickle juice interspersed with water all day on the scorchers.. the salt in the pickle brine ensures that you'll keep absorbing the water. It takes a little getting used to, but it's an easy solution :)

That sounds backwards. Drinking salt leads to dehydration.

No, I don't think that is right.  The salt helps you retain water.  One of the reasons that people with high blood pressure are to limit their salt and take diaretics.  This removes excess water from their tissure which lowers their blood pressure.  I know, within a half hour of taking my meds, I am looking for a privy.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Sitara on May 31, 2009, 07:00:40 PM
That sounds backwards. Drinking salt leads to dehydration.

Salt is an electrolyte though and when you sweat you become low on salt.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: DT_Masters on June 01, 2009, 01:51:13 AM
First, a side item. At Scarborough 08, I suddenly found I had drop down and take it slow, take in more shows. Granted, it was hotter and more humid that day, but I grew up in tropics/deserts, so what was the sudden difference? Switching from 35 mm SLR to a DSLR. With the previous, every so often one has to seek shade to switch out the roll but with the latter......rather like shop till you drop.

The other thing is that I tend to go for sun protection over being in minimal to be cool. On oceanographic cruises/beach work, my comrades would be in tank tops and shorts while I was in full khaki. Although.......once that sun block goes on and the wind hits it, it's a nice cooling effect.

But there you go; try to find a character that would wear light colored fabrics instead of dark ones.....unless you have to be the King, of course.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Woodland Artisan on June 01, 2009, 07:37:02 AM
First, consult with your doctor if you have questions or concerns about this issue.  Only they have your personal medical background and experience to help you make decisions on what you should do to help your body in the heat.

I was an Athletic Trainer (sports medicine specialist) for several years working with highschool, major college and pro teams and one of our major responsibilities was keeping the athletes hydrated and performing to high levels in extreme heat and humidity for hours at a time.

http://www.rebuildii.com/hydration.html (http://www.rebuildii.com/hydration.html)      Here's a short excerpt from an article on the issue that might shed some light on what's being discussed.  Lane (the writer of the paper that that excerpt drew from) and I were student trainers in college together.

Here are a couple of points regarding keeping your body cool(er) in the heat ...
- Stay out of the heat!  Yeah, a big "duh" statement but there is simply no better way.
- Water. Water. Water.
- NO Alcohol.  SAme goes for caffeine.  They both dehydrate in various ways.  The more alcohol you drink, the faster you loose fluids.
- Hydrate for the NEXT day.  Going to faire tomorrow?  Increase your (good) fluid intake today.  That is what will help you tomorrow.  Obviously, you still have to drink during your day at faire, too!
- Replace the fluids you lost today, tonight.  Just because you're not "in" faire, doesn't mean you stop taking in good fluids.  More heat-related problems occur the day AFTER than the day during.
- Simply replacing your sodium (salt) isn't enough.  There is NO magic potion, or pill that will keep you from having problems.  You MUST prepare ahead of time and work with YOUR body.

Stay safe out there.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Adriana Rose on June 02, 2009, 06:20:13 PM
Still be smart!
Avoid too much alcohol and soda.
In the heat of the day try to sit at a show and cool off.
Eat! something in your tummy makes things kinda better
Keep a fan on you or a small spray bottle and mist your self every now and then!


Lots of water! I have also found that if you try to eat a decent meal before you head to faire your body is all nice and happy!
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Morgan Dreadlocke on June 04, 2009, 04:33:38 PM
Been there a few times.

Keep an eye on the people around you. Bumbling of words, lack of coordination in the extremeties and loss of peripherial vision are all solid clues. Depending on how far into the red they
(or you) are it might take several days to feel better.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: McGuinness on June 04, 2009, 05:39:44 PM
This is an important subject to me personally. On our opening day at PaRF in 2005, I had severe heat stroke and had a minor heart attack on my way home (luckily, I had already pulled off the road and called for someone to pick me up by then...I wouldn't have made it otherwise). A heart attach and heart condition from it at 23 will teach you your lesson realy quick, I'll tell you that much.  I've done my research and tried all the tips of the trade since then because after that one incident, I'm much more likely to get in trouble that much quicker next time (and it has come close, especially this past season). Know your body, know your limits, and know when to ask for help. Like its been said, if you see anyone else incoherent or off-balance, just offering them some water could help.

About the salt and electrolyte issue....its not so much the salt you ned, its the minerals in it. One of the causes for my heart attack was a lack of sodium and potassium (things that those pickles and bananas and whatnot are high in). I was drinking like a fish all that day (I thought) but I hadn't stopped to eat more than a few french fries or something like that and had essentially washed all the electrolytes and minerals out of my system at the same time I was getting dehydrated. Your heart is triggered to pump by something called the Na/K Pump (Sodium /Potassium Pump), a ratio of those two minerals in your system. That ratio gets off, too low or too high, and things go wonky. Or stop. Beware though of cooling off too quickly if you get in trouble. Like someone said, going from 100+ degrees to 40 can put your body into shock and again, make things go wonky.

I'm a big fan of Emergen-C packets myself - they're a great little energy kick during the day. Others in our cast also swear by some other little packets called Squelchers. They aren't a way to avoid drinking and getting cool, but they help keep the electrolytes up.

 K,I'm off my soap box now.   :-X
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Woodland Artisan on June 04, 2009, 08:55:00 PM
Quote
Like its been said, if you see anyone else incoherent or off-balance, just offering them some water could help.

Also, get them in the shade, sitting down (or laying down if they'll let you do that), fanning, ice packs in strategic places, etc.  If that doesn't seem to help them within just a minute or two or they start to feel or appear worse, your next call is to the nearest health professional.  In fact, do that last thing anyway.  That's what they are there for.

If that person has progressed beyond the simple seemingly incoherent or slightly off-balance stage .. meaning that they are either fumbling/slurring their words, can't stand, aren't sweating at all or very little, pale, unfocusing eyes (and so on ... lots of possible signs) then you YELL for medics and start stripping the person.  I know, this is a very touchy (not like that kids!) subject and situation.  But, if someone is clearly in the stages of "Heat Stroke" (as opposed to just "Heat Exhaustion") then the primary response is to cool the body off as quickly as possible by stripping everything off and packing ice under the armpits and in the groin area and/or dumping cold water over those areas along with lots of fanning to give good evaporative cooling.  Don't try to give Heat Stroke victims anything to drink. It's too late for that and they probably won't be able to take it anyway.  Yes, there is a risk of shock.  That can be dealt with separately and, hopefully, at an event/faire there will be health professionals to take over at that point at the latest.  If not, respond to the shock risk as well ... but get that body temperature down fast!

This is a life/death situation and you have a very limited time to act.  If the person gets pissed that you're starting to strip them, then you've misread the signs of Heat STROKE.  If they are really in the Heat Stroke stages, they'll rarely be able to speak or fight you.  If they do get pissed, politely appologize and suggest to that person that they voluntarily start shedding some clothes discreetly.

In my career as an Athletic Trainer I dealt with a lot of Heat Strokes and far too many Heat Exhaustions.  Scary stuff and, when it truely is a Heat Stroke situaion, modesty be damned.

Stay safe ...
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: MonkeysMurklins on July 06, 2009, 04:04:15 PM
Ice is not usually the best thing to use when someone has heat stroke. The temperature difference can cause the person's blood veins to contract, making it harder to cool off and actually worsening the situation. Getting them in the shade and splashing cool water over them is a better option. Fanning is good too. If you're able to get the person to drink, a mixture of salt and water is better than water alone for any dehydration related disorder. Watered down Gatorade or juice is a good choice. If the person actually has heat stroke, though, anything you do is just temporary until the health professionals can take over. It's not something you should self-treat.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Khaalis on July 08, 2009, 02:16:07 AM
At Sterling, the faire staff and many of the long term patrons order a special "Half-n-Half" not normally offered, which consists of 1/2 iced Tea and 1/2 Lemonade. Everyone swears by it for helping prevent heat stroke issues.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Emerald Shaunassey on July 09, 2009, 03:03:21 AM
Speaking as an RN and one who has had a full blown heat stroke in Nobles garb in 100+ heat doing the KCRF Death March (aka Parade) - let me just say that there have been some very good ideas put forth here.  When someone is in full blown heat stroke and there isn't an RN or EMT on hand just then, you do ANYTHING you have to save that person's life.  Yes, you can have a heart attack no matter your age or weight or health level for you are messing with that lovely K+/N+ pump that moves all the muscles in your body (btw, potatoes with the skins on are a much better source of Potassium (K+) than even bananas).  Yes, do strip the person and get those layers off!  In the heat of the moment, it is not a sexual come-on or anything lecherous - it is saving someone's bacon.  Ice does help - those giving the assist, wrap the ice in a single layer of cloth (your handkerchief works well) and it cuts down on the shock.  Assign one or two persons to be the faners, send 2 people to get EMS and have 2 people icing/watering/stripping the victim.  Remember - to many helpers cuts off any chance of a breeze reaching the victim; keep your help staff to a minimum for air movement.  Yes it is imperative to start First Aid asasp but, don't go so hog wild that you wear yourself out in the first 2 minutes - it's going to take a while to locate EMS and get a Rig.. er.. Ambulance to your location.  It is up to you, once you start, to keep going to help your fellow human.  Take it slow and steady. 

Yes, shade is nice but sometimes the victim just doesn't drop in the shade where it helps him/her and you!  Parasols are wonderful things but again, be ware of to many folks gathered about.  Another trick I've seen used before is a ladies over skirt stretched over top of the victim which in turn was used to create a gentle breeze over the victim (ala Cleopatra's fan boys).  If I hadn't seen it, I don't think I would have believed it myself. 

Rescuers - do not be afraid to "tag out" with your partner - the last thing your fellow rescuers need is for you to become a victim. 


Onto preventative measures: Yes pickle juice, pickles, crackers, chips, other salty foods are good ... in SMALL portions and amounts.  To much of a good thing is DEFINITELY a bad thing.  Salt/salty foods hold onto fluid but to much salt/salty food can cause that fluid to move out of the cells and into the general tissues; something called Edema and is not good.  Straight Gatorade all day long is not good for you - again and over abundance of electrolytes.  A 50/50 solution with water is good but again, too much of a good thing can be a bad thing.  A word of warning about water - you can throw yourself into "Water Toxicity" where in you drank waaaaaay to much water and flushed dang near every electrolyte from your body.  This will affect mental acuity, speech, movement, and affects your heart (you could either develop a slow or bradycardic rate or a super fast or tachycardic rate).  Do take things slow and easy (I know not all faire owners and managers seem to understand this) but, you have a choice - your health/life vs. what the bossman/woman wants.  If you take yourself out by inducing bad health; you cannot come back to do the job you love.  Pace yourselves, drink constantly, avoid alcohol and caffiene, avoid sweet drinks (like pop which has sodium in it and leaves a sticky residue on your skin after sweat dries ...hmm... stinging insects love this!).  Don't over do it on the good stuff like Gatorade, sit in the shade and hold your own "court" with passing patrons - they will probably need a shady break just like you do.  If your faire persona's station allows - have a good ole water fight - ensuring that only those wanting to get soaked are soaked (nothing like drowning a passing patron or your area manager!)  Ice down the bodice, next to the breastbone helps as does ice down the back along the spine.  Gents... you can put ice in your cod pieces to help cool you off - it may not sound so great to you guys but, your body will love you for it as tights do not allow your body to release the built up heat it normally would.  Be espeically careful if your tights have ANY spandex or Lycra in them - they are both dread polyesters.  Gents, you too can put ice down your doublets both chest and back to help cool you off. 

As someone else stated, see your doctor before donning all those layers of clothes (espeically if this is your fist time in nobles!); talk with him/her about how much you will be wearing and how many hours you will be wearing all those clothes.  Ask him/her if there is anything they recommend you do months, weeks, days, and hours before donning your garb.  Eat well rounded (all food group) meals prior to and during the faire day - you don't have to lug in a Henrican basket of food to eat on all day - cheese cubes, fresh fruits (grapes, apples, grapefruit, oranges, bandannas, kiwis, cherries, etc), cold summer sausage slices or jerky, crackers or rolls, and yes, you could even have individual bottles of milk stashed in your ice chest along with your food.  You've a complete meal that can be grazed upon all day long to keep your blood sugar up (even if you aren't diabetic or hypoglycemic) and keep your energy level stable. 

Most importantly, you know your body better than any other person - listen to it's message and heed any warnings it gives you.  Seek out assistance if you cannot handle any problems on your own.  Do not be to "macho" or "shy" to ask for help - we are all here to help each other.  Take care of yourselves as the summer rolls on - for us here in the lower mid-south - our dog days of summer are about to kick off; along with two faires - one this month and one next month. 

Faire Fun and Health to you all ...

[stepping down from the soapbox and removing the uniform]

Emerald 
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: RenaissanceBarbie on July 15, 2009, 12:35:26 PM
Good information, thanks!  It's good to remember also that it takes four hours for the body to process water taken in.  If you're thirsty it's too late.  I recommend drinking A LOT of water before you go to sleep before faire to give your body the time it needs to get ready.  As a singer in the dusty, dusty streets of CO I try to wake up in the middle of the night before a faire day and drink a water bottle, which may be excessive if you're not singing but is still great.  You'll really have to pee in the morning but it works well.  :D  Protein intake and enough sleep all help too.  When you're body has what it needs in other areas besides just water intake it can better prepare itself for the nasty heat.

Stay "cool" everyone and enjoy your respective faires!   :D
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Whistler Fred on July 15, 2009, 03:55:52 PM
In addition to water and Gatorade, I have found that V8 juice can really pick me up when I'm feeling woozy on a hot day.  Probably the combination of sodium and vitamins.

This was touched on earlier, but a good bowl of soup can also help replenish you on a hot day.  It sounds counter-intuitive, but a hot soup is easy to digest and gets those nutrients into your body quickly.

Great post!
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Celtic_Fae on July 27, 2009, 01:39:47 PM
Pickles, while good for the preventative measures already mentioned, are also good if you happen to get sunburned. Just apply thin slices of pickles for about 15 minutes and repeating every few hours as necessary.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Carl Heinz on July 27, 2009, 06:12:08 PM
Water and sun screen.  No alcohol or soft drinks.  Drink LOTS of water.  Cuthberts rule of thumb--if you haven't pee'd by noon, you're not drinking enough.

Wet your sleeves.

Ice can cause shock if someone has gone down.

If someone is going down, most events have EMT's on hand.  Grab Security and get them involved.

The former guildmaster of St Michaels at RPFS carried a bottle of small tablets called Bioplasma.  I think the manufacturer is Hyland.  These are salts.  We also use pickles and olives and have Gatorade in the back area.

The guilds in parades at RPFS carry water with them.  Water should also be available at most ale stands.

Been doing this for about 30 years and haven't dropped yet.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: L Joy Arroyo on August 03, 2009, 09:58:17 PM
Personally, I've found that avoiding milk products is a good thing...tends to curdle in the stomach.  May not cause heat stroke directly, but the vomiting certainly dehydrates a person.  Also, it makes you feel more full, and therefore less likely to drink water.

Cheers and stay safe!
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: DragonWing on August 07, 2009, 09:58:06 AM
Wow, this has been a very informative thread.  It is supposedly going to be in the High 80' and Mid 90's for PARF opening weekend starting tomorrow. And of coarse I am going on Sunday which will be in the 90's.

Thank you all for sharing this wonderful information. My partner and I will heed it well.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Carl Heinz on August 07, 2009, 10:09:09 AM
It is supposedly going to be in the High 80' and Mid 90's for PARF opening weekend starting tomorrow.
One day while we were getting ready to leave when RPFS was still at Devore, we were at the van and I was taking off my doublet.  Herself says something like "You know you have steam coming off your back?".  The heat sensor in the van said 113.  Drink your water!!  Dampen your arms!!  Drink your water!! Avoid alcohol and soft drinks.  :)
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Lady_Lily on August 09, 2009, 02:03:10 PM
This is definitely a topic I know a bit about! I was in a summer activity and passing out/heat exhaustion was definitely a huge concern.

A lot of people have mentioned some excellent things.
*hydrate during the week-make sure you're drinking plenty of water. Hydration today comes from being hydrated yesterday
*Ice on the wrists- a friend told me about this. Her father was an EMT and said that the wrists, arm pits, feet, and head are the best contact points for cooling someone down. If you're starting to feel warm, take a break in the shade, grab some ice (the pickle guys have always been awesome about giving it away!) and put some on your feet, ankles, wrists, head to help cool down. Doing this periodically will definitely help keep you cool!
*Gatorade- definitely an excellent way to stay hydrated, once again, I had medical staff recommend the 50/50 water/gatorade as being more effective because it reduces the sugar content and the water helps to hydrate you, which is why the gatorade powders have been more recommended than the bottles. Emergen-C is another excellent additive.
*If someone does pass out- ice under the arm pits, cooling them down with ice water, removing shoes, hats, ice on the ankles, wrists, and once they start to come around, reduce the amount of cold as it's easy to go too far and sending them toward hypothermia. 50/50 water gatorade and EMT's and medical professionals are a must!

Take it easy all!! Make sure to relax and rest and keep cool!!!
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: DeadBishop on August 09, 2009, 06:16:42 PM
At Sterling, the faire staff and many of the long term patrons order a special "Half-n-Half" not normally offered, which consists of 1/2 iced Tea and 1/2 Lemonade. Everyone swears by it for helping prevent heat stroke issues.

A virgin Arnold Palmer...one of my favorite beverages to beat the heat at fest! 


I'm going to sticky this thread, as it is one of the best discussions to grace the pages of R/F.com.  There is no one who wouldn't benefit from reading this. 

On a side note, while I myself have not suffered from heat stroke, I did suffer the consequences of not staying hydrated through the fest season a few years back; kidney stones.  This was not a pleasant ordeal, let me tell you.  I make sure to have liquid within arms reach at all times now, and remind myself and others around me to drink something if they haven't in the past 20 minutes.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Lady_Claira on August 10, 2009, 09:58:27 AM
Wow, I should have checked this out sooner. So much good information.

One thing that is probably important, is that if someone is getting over-heated and you finally get them to drink water/gatorade, have them drink slowly. I remember in marching band in high school, I wasn't as far as heat-stroke, but I was getting really close twice. And each time my first instinct was to guzzle water, but that almost made me sick in itself. Drink slowly so that you don't make yourself sick when you're trying to re-hydrate yourself.

Make sure you're getting both water and electrolytes. I know this might sound gross, but the yellower your pee the less water you have in your system. That's usually a marker I use if I can (flushing privies anyone?)

My other big note may not directly deal with heat stroke, but use a lot of sun screen, especially on exposed skin. I know personally people who have gotten sun burn badly enough to have it blister and right now I'm in a bit of pain from not applying sun-screen right above my bodice. So it's another good rule of thumb.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Count Adolfo on August 10, 2009, 12:36:37 PM
another (lesser known) fact is that pickle juice (the stuff the pickles sit in) is very, very high in electrolytes and is great for re-hydrating.  It also defeats the "guzzle" reflex because, well, most people don't really want to guzzle pickle juice...
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Lady Renee Buchanan on August 10, 2009, 08:02:36 PM
We just got back from one of the most humid, muggy days I've ever been to at Bristol.  Although I am regularly a huge water drinker, I felt myself starting to feel draggy and woozy. 

I then started alternating a mug of water and then a mug of gatorade.  The gatorade tastes awful (at least to me it does, I don't like it), but by the time I finished the mug, I felt back to my normal self.  Then I would have a mug of water, not right away, but probably about 20 minutes after the gatorade.  When I started feeling out of sorts again, I would go back to the gatorade, and alternate back and forth.  It really worked for me.  I had lots of privvy runs, so I know I wasn't dehydrated.

If this has been mentioned, please forgive, but I didn't read back through all the posts.   ;D
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Becky10 on August 23, 2009, 12:24:45 AM
I ended up getting really bad heat stroke two years ago at faire and ended up laying under a bench eating a cup of greek olives and drinking lots of water that helped alot. Sipping salt water is also good if no olives are near. ;)
Most people focus just on replenishing the body with water but forget that you also loose salt.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: bran_gray on January 29, 2010, 06:08:00 PM
It's been hinted at a couple of times but I'm going to go ahead and stress it a little more.

If somebody does go down because of heat stroke nine times out of ten from that day forth (if they survive and they should because of all this wonderful training) their body will not be able to handle heat as well as it used to.  I had an Uncle that nearly died from heat stroke and to this day anything above 75 degrees has him sweating and feeling like it's 95 degrees.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Ambrosine on February 15, 2010, 04:22:36 PM
I completely ruined a day at faire when I had heat stroke hit me at about 11:00 (My fault did not eat or drink anything that morning and we do live in Florida). I ended up having the first aid guys (which were at least cute) lay me out on a blanket under a tree giving me water and one of the vendors brought me some fresh fruit. I was there for a good hour until my friend was able to pack me up in the car and take me home. On the funny side I was a fairy that year and of course had to remove my wings and they were laying next to me. You would hear people joking telling kids I was having medical attention because some one tore my wings off, or "this is what happens to the mischievous faeries!"
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: McGuinness on February 22, 2010, 09:57:52 PM
It's been hinted at a couple of times but I'm going to go ahead and stress it a little more.

If somebody does go down because of heat stroke nine times out of ten from that day forth (if they survive and they should because of all this wonderful training) their body will not be able to handle heat as well as it used to.  I had an Uncle that nearly died from heat stroke and to this day anything above 75 degrees has him sweating and feeling like it's 95 degrees.

So true. Every since I had my experience with heat stroke, I can certainly fell myself getting to the Danger Point much faster than before. As the doctor at the ER said to me, its like running the oil down in a car. Do it once and you can fix it, but the damage is there and its not gonna take as long for the oil to get to a dangerous low again.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Celtic_Fae on February 22, 2010, 10:51:40 PM
It's been hinted at a couple of times but I'm going to go ahead and stress it a little more.

If somebody does go down because of heat stroke nine times out of ten from that day forth (if they survive and they should because of all this wonderful training) their body will not be able to handle heat as well as it used to.  I had an Uncle that nearly died from heat stroke and to this day anything above 75 degrees has him sweating and feeling like it's 95 degrees.

So true. Every since I had my experience with heat stroke, I can certainly fell myself getting to the Danger Point much faster than before. As the doctor at the ER said to me, its like running the oil down in a car. Do it once and you can fix it, but the damage is there and its not gonna take as long for the oil to get to a dangerous low again.

I'll second this! It's a miserable fact, but it's true. I used to be able to do faires in 100+ degree weather. Now if it threatens to hit 80+, I'm not feeling to well.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: brier patch charlie on February 25, 2010, 08:23:31 PM
After having a H/S the only fairs I do are when the weather is still cool. If it's going to be 80 plus heat, I'm not going. Sure wish there were more winter fairs.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Al-Nimer on February 27, 2010, 11:18:56 PM
After having a H/S the only fairs I do are when the weather is still cool. If it's going to be 80 plus heat, I'm not going. Sure wish there were more winter fairs.
Don't know how close you are, but Four Winds @ Tyler, TX is starting next weekend.  http://fourwindsfaire.com/ (http://fourwindsfaire.com/)

It is likely to still be pretty cool this year, at least in March  ;)
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: LadyStitch on March 16, 2010, 03:58:37 PM
I got heat exaustion when I was in collage.  Our superiors at the camp refused us from having camel back or even water bottles on the field with us while we worked.  We all wore hats and biki tops, but I can tell you.  I remember my world closing in, and getting dizzy.  Then just sitting down.  No one came to help.  I remember getting to my car, and a street cornor on the way home, then pulling into my drive way.  Then the couch.  After that, no alot.  What I do remember involved my grandmother wrapping rice in wash cloths, and damp cloths on me, then in the car to the ER.   I drank, litteraly a half gallon of water in 1 hours in the ER.  Not the most fun night to spend.  Since then I have really been particular about how hot I get.  I always have water near by, and when possible I do a half and half juice or gaterade. 

The only time when I was upset was that my rogue was at faire last year and his blood sugar was dropping fast, AND he was getting too hot.  I ran to a local vendor and asked can I have Ice, pickle juice, or gatorade, something.  The clerks were going to make me fork over 2.00 for a cup of ice for him, and told me they didn't carry any gatorade, so I had to pay another 3.00 for a soda.  By then the manager of the stand came out. (She imedily handed me a huge tankard of ice water and cube for him.)
When I returned later with her tankard,she wasn't pleased with how the clerks treated me. She made it known if something like this EVER happened again that they were to hand over the biggest cup of ice they could, no questions asked. Then go get her. She would rather pay out of her own pocket the jucie/gatorade/ ice  for a patron who is going into diabetic shock, or heat stroke then have to explain to management why they stood by and did nothing to help them.   Needless to say we are buying our treats & soda from her this year.  ;D
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Badra on March 25, 2010, 01:33:14 PM
I skimmed, so apologies if this has been mentioned already...make sure you're peeing enough.  The paramedics at Scarby said every hour if you're taking in fluids like you should be.  (not sure that's possible or practical...but there you are)

I think I saw everything else:
*water (but not so much water that you flush your electrolytes and vomit on poor, defenseless trees)
*pedialyte and/or gatoraide to supplement the water
*eat regular meals not just snacklettes or crap
*avoid alcohol
*avoid sweet drinks
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Monsignor de Beaumanoir on March 25, 2010, 02:42:29 PM
DEFINITION

A heat injury occurs when a Faire Attendee/Pilgrim engages in physical activity to the extent where the heat production within his body exceeds its ability to lose heat adequately. This results in a rise in inner body (body core) temperature to the levels at which normal body functions are interfered with. This may lead to temporary or permanent disturbances in bodily functions.

The three types of heat injuries:

? Heat cramps - are the result of excessive salt and water losses due to profuse sweating in Faire Attendee/Pilgrims whose bodies are attempting to rapidly lose heat. It presents as intermittent muscle cramps, which usually occur on the legs (calves and thighs).

? Heat exhaustion - is a more severe form of heat injury. It implies a significant loss of water from the body. The signs and symptoms are:
_ weakness,
_ exhaustion,
_ headaches,
_ dizziness and
_ profuse sweating with an elevated body
temperature.

? Heat stroke - is the most serious form of heat injuries. It manifests with a body core Temperature of 41 degress  Celsius and above. Faire Attendee/Pilgrims may present with confusion, aggressive behavior and may progress into a comatose state. It is a medical emergency!

BODY HEAT REGULATION: “STAYING SAFE”

_ In order for the body to lose heat adequately, regular rest in a cool or shady environment is also required. This allows the heat loss process to keep up with and “overtake” the heat gain process. Concurrent hydration is critical.

_ High air temperature, high relative humidity (GARF, BARF, etc) and exposure to the sun make it difficult for Faire Attendee/Pilgrims to regulate their body temperature.

_ Excessive clothing will prevent heat from being lost to the environment.

_ When the environmental conditions and/ or clothing prevent the heat generated within the body from being dissipated (do you really need that suit of mail), the body temperature will rise significantly. If this cycle is not stopped, heat injuries will occur.

_ The heat injuries are commonly associated with hard work in hot weather. However, they can also occur in relatively cool conditions when Faire Attendee/Pilgrims are dressed in heavy protective clothing (Chain Mail with Arming gear).

_ The same principles apply at night as well. If there is inadequate cooling of the body during physical exertion at night, heat injuries can occur.

Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Monsignor de Beaumanoir on March 25, 2010, 02:44:54 PM
WHAT IS DEHYDRATION?

_ Dehydration refers to the reduction of body water content to that below the normal physiological (and safe) level. Some degree of dehydration is inevitable when working in a hot and humid environment. This is due to water loss through sweating.


FACTS ON DEHYDRATION

_ New Faire Attendee/Pilgrims are more prone to dehydration as they generally tend not to have a “H2O drinking habit”. They tend to drink water only when extremely thirsty and this is too late. Having not trained regularly in hot and humid conditions, they do not have an “instinct” to drink water beyond the point of thirst. They must be trained to do so.

_ An individual under stress in a hot and humid environment may not sense dehydration at the early stages.

_ Faire Attendee/Pilgrims may maintain themselves at about 1.5 litres below their ideal hydration status without any sense of thirst, thus exhibiting “voluntary dehydration”.

_ The body may suffer dehydration of 1-2% of body weight and perform less effectively before the feeling of thirst is even noticed.

_ Caffeine and alcohol beverages have diuretic properties, which increase the risk of dehydration through increased urination.

_ Heat, wind and dry air increase the body’s water requirements through loss of body water as sweat.

_ At high altitudes (>2000 metres above sea levels) there is an increase in the rate of breathing due to reduced oxygen levels. The dryness of the atmosphere also increases water loss through breathing. However, the feeling of thirst becomes less felt, and the desire to drink is suppressed at an altitude.

_ Faire Attendee/Pilgrims often become dehydrated while travelling, especially if the trip is long. Water consumption is as important during travel as any other time.

_ Faire Attendee/Pilgrims who are well trained, fit and fully hydrated tolerate heat exposure more effectively than the less fit and dehydrated Faire Attendee/Pilgrims.

EFFECTS OF CLOTHING ON DEHYDRATION

_ Excessive clothing can contribute to dehydration by impeding evaporation of sweat. This causes the body to produce more sweat in order to cool the body. This leads to rise in body temperature.

_ Multiple layers of clothing, even if thin, will provide a considerable amount of insulation and, therefore, should be avoided.


Heat Injuries are totally preventable.

What to drink:

_ Plain water in sufficient volume will help the hydration process

_ Providing cool water with added electrolytes is difficult but will be helpful

_ If the administration system allows it, attempts should be made to provide cool water with electrolytes. This will especially be useful for poorly acclimatized individuals such as recruits

The international guidelines, advocated by the Order of St John (Hospitallers) are:

_ Heat exposure less than 90 minutes - Plain, cool water

_ Heat exposure exceeding 90 minutes - cool, suitably flavoured carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage (concentration - no more than 8%, or 2 table spoons of sugar per litre)

_ Heat exposure exceeding 240 minutes - Flavoured carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage supplemented with one tea spoon of salt per litre

What NOT to drink:

_ Carbonated drinks (feeling of being bloated)

_ Alcohol, coffee, tea (diuretic property)

_ Commercially available Oral Rehydration Solutions (unpalatable, designed to replace fluid lost in diarrhoea, but not suitable for use during activities in heat)

_ Carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage concentrations greater than 8% (delays water absorption)

_ Hot drinks, when cooler ones are available

_ Drinks of unknown ingredients (Really….faire goers!)

Escorting “flattened or flat lined” pilgrims is a drag, let’s be safe out there…..Deus vult!
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Badra on March 26, 2010, 12:58:05 PM

What NOT to drink:

_ Commercially available Oral Rehydration Solutions (unpalatable, designed to replace fluid lost in diarrhoea, but not suitable for use during activities in heat)


If you're talking about Pedialyte & Gatoraide, this is what the doc who helped catch me when I passed out at Scarby, the paramedics that took care of me after I passed out at Scarby, and the first responders that monitor firefighters during calls who provided security & medical care at Tablerock directed me to drink in conjunction with water.  The first responders who took care of me after I spewed water all over a tree at Tablerock and kept me from passing out are the ones who informed me you can flush your electrolytes by drinking too much water.  I work in health care with a bunch of nurses who confirmed this information and told me I'm lucky I didn't fry my little brain & end up in the hospital as heat related injuries are VERY dangerous.  All of the aforementioned trained medical people are the ones who asked why in the blue heck I was drinking lemonade at Scarby, quizzed me about eating real food, quizzed me about any alcohol consumption, and scolded me for not realizing I wasn't peeing enough while sweating like crazy in the heat.  In both cases, I wasn't allowed to leave until I had consumed Gatoraide at Scarby/Pedialyte at Tablerock and was able to pee.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: BLAKDUKE on March 27, 2010, 07:59:38 AM
I have found that after every turn around the faire, a long stay at the ale house works best.  If is hotter then a shorter turn and a longer stay works very well.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Badra on April 27, 2010, 12:54:52 PM
FYI, you're more susceptible from going down from the heat after the 1st time it happens.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Lady Renee Buchanan on April 27, 2010, 08:39:52 PM
Having just passed out from the heat this past weekend at RenDezvous, landing on the ground in the dirt in a total faint, something that became extremely apparent to me was that there wasn't one vendor that SOLD gatorade.  When I was in the First Aid Tent (where I spent the afternoon), the EMTs had a big cooler of it, of which I consumed quite a lot.

On Sunday, around 4 p.m., the heat started getting to me again (and I didn't wear garb for the first time in 11 years), and we looked all over for somewhere to buy gatorade.  Couldn't find one place.  So I went back to First Aid again, and they filled my water bottle with it.

My point is that if you are starting to feel ill from the heat, you may not be able to buy gatorade anywhere, but you can get it free at the First Aid tent, as they are always sure to have it.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: LadyStitch on April 28, 2010, 08:31:10 AM
Also if you are friends with some one who is friends of faire they have some in their area as well.  Grantd their areas are at each end of the faire but it is an option.
I also found that bodice chillers using cigar tubes help greatly.  The Pink Pirate got too hot on Saturday.  We are working out a way to put a cigar tube in a cotton bag so it is suspended over his chest.  That way he can just lift his cravat and put ice in it.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Badra on April 28, 2010, 06:25:51 PM
Having just passed out from the heat this past weekend at RenDezvous...
On Sunday, around 4 p.m., the heat started getting to me again

No way?!  You went down from the heat & went back out the next day :o  You've got bigger...well...you know...than me!  I felt like hammered doggie doo after I went down that Easter at Scarby.  Cooking your brain will do that to you.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Lady Renee Buchanan on April 28, 2010, 07:09:13 PM
Having just passed out from the heat this past weekend at RenDezvous...
On Sunday, around 4 p.m., the heat started getting to me again

No way?!  You went down from the heat & went back out the next day :o  You've got bigger...well...you know...than me!  I felt like hammered doggie doo after I went down that Easter at Scarby.  Cooking your brain will do that to you.

Well, it was our first time to Scarby, and I really wanted to see it, after being out of commission half the previous afternoon.  So I wore street clothes, and every hour I made sure I drank enough (no alcohol at all), and every 2 hours, I ate something.  Not huge meals, but fruit, nuts, even a couple of cookies.  Just something so I didn't get weak.  And drinking the Gatorade alternating with water helped.

And I forgot to mention until I saw Lady Stitch's post.  Dona Catalina was kind enough to bring Steve and I a glass of Gatorade from the FoF.  However, unless you are at a faire that is large enough to have a FoF, then probably the only place it will be available will be the first aid tent.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Ryk Rakham on April 29, 2010, 07:08:55 AM
Simple - the hotter it gets, the less alcohol you should consume.

Drink lots of water, no matter what the commercials say, water is the best hydrator.

Queen B set me on a great way to help alleviate the heat and I mentioned it to a doctor friend and he said "absolutely". Aspirin, plain aspirin. As long as you can tolerate it well, 2 in the morning and 2 in the afternoon will help your body fight the "pain" of heat, help you feel cooler and help with tired feet pain.

Oh, and for those who might have trouble with "chafing" of your thighs...Preparation H rubbed on before you put on your clothes helps both lubricate and prevent pain and chafing. So does baking soda, but it sweats off faster.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Badra on April 29, 2010, 01:31:38 PM
Drink lots of water, no matter what the commercials say, water is the best hydrator.

Go back up & read the parts of the posts about drinking too much water and flusing your electrolytes & the parts about what professional medical & first responders have recommended.  Water is great, but it isn't always enough & it isn't always the best.  Conversely, too much water is a REALLY bad thing.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Merlin the Elder on May 18, 2010, 04:22:27 PM
It takes a LOT of water to become a bad thing...  If you're dehydrating, alcohol is VERY BAD. It possibly has been mentioned earlier in this thread, but one way of determining if your are dehydrating is by pinching the skin in the web of your hand between the thumb and fore-finger. If it restores back right away, you're probably ok, but if it is slow to stop moving, you are very likely dehydrated.

Other bad things to drink if you're prone to dehydration, or are trying to rehydrate: anything with caffeine or alcohol. Yeah, it sucks...I live on coffee and Jack Daniels (or beer at faire), but it really can kill you.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Bonny Pearl on May 18, 2010, 05:50:33 PM
It possibly has been mentioned earlier in this thread, but one way of determining if your are dehydrating is by pinching the skin in the web of your hand between the thumb and fore-finger. If it restores back right away, you're probably ok, but if it is slow to stop moving, you are very likely dehydrated.

I will have to remember that!  Thanks for that pointer.  I recall Scarby a few years back on Memorial and how unbearably hot it was.  I am already thinking about what I will wear this Memorial to help stay cool.  Bodices may just have to go to the wayside or be very loose so air will circulate, etc.  Comfort and keeping cool will win over looking the part if it's a scorcher.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: DT_Masters on May 19, 2010, 08:41:47 PM
Having just passed out from the heat this past weekend at RenDezvous, landing on the ground in the dirt in a total faint, something that became extremely apparent to me was that there wasn't one vendor that SOLD gatorade.  When I was in the First Aid Tent (where I spent the afternoon), the EMTs had a big cooler of it, of which I consumed quite a lot.

On Sunday, around 4 p.m., the heat started getting to me again (and I didn't wear garb for the first time in 11 years), and we looked all over for somewhere to buy gatorade.  Couldn't find one place.  So I went back to First Aid again, and they filled my water bottle with it.

My point is that if you are starting to feel ill from the heat, you may not be able to buy gatorade anywhere, but you can get it free at the First Aid tent, as they are always sure to have it.

I buy it from the stores in the powder form.......and carry it as standard load out in the bike frame bags so I'm always sure to have it when I'm biking. It won't be cold.....but it will be there.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Tim T on May 19, 2010, 08:53:46 PM
I grabbed some small packets of Propel powdered mix at Target that should do the trick as well.  It's a single serving, sized for a standard water bottle, just tear off the top and pour in.  I'm sure Gatorade and others probably have the same type of product.  BTW, I got the strawberry kiwi, which is really tasty, and only has 10 calories if that matters to ya.

Cheers!
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Don Quixote on June 13, 2010, 08:04:05 AM
I know it won't help with heat stroke, but having some experience working faires in layers of fabric and armor, that copious amounts of talcum powder applied when dressing help a great deal with the comfort level. Sorry if this suggestion has been posted before.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Delireus on June 22, 2010, 10:04:23 PM
Even though this isn't ren-related, I feel I need to say thank you to everyone who posted on this thread, it saved my life today.

I live in Texas, were the only thing higher than the temp is the humidity percentage. I'm from around Houston so it gets pretty bad here during the summer. A friend of mine and I went to the beach today. We, stupidly, only brought diet coke, though we drank a bit of water before the hour drive there. We had been on the beach laying in the sun for about an hour when we decided to go, as my friend had stepped on a dead bee and it stung her foot. We stood up and I felt dizzy and I knew I was in trouble. We walked up the stairs from the sea wall and just those 10 steps or so in that heat did me in and I started to go blind, I saw all these colors like if you close your eyes tight and rub them, I was also dizzy and talking weird, like my words didn't make sense.  All I could think of was everything everyone had said on this thread. I just randomly read everything on here one night, knowing it might come in handy one day.

The car was about 3 blocks away and I knew I'd probably pass out by then. All I was thinking is I had to cool myself off asap. The only thing I could think of was to ask this man packing his truck to help me, and thankfully he did. I told him I couldn't see and needed water. He was wonderful, he gave me a bottle of water and poured another over me while holding ice in a towel on my neck and flagged an emergency vehicle over while my friend got the car. I felt terrible that my friend had to go all that way with her bee sting in her foot without me, as I was the one helping her till I felt sick. But like I said, that man was great, he helped carry our cooler over to our car and we drove to a restaurant for water and soup. I felt 100% better. I know it could have easily gotten a lot worse, I was actually very scared for a while there. But I just wanted to say thank you so much, to everyone who replied to this thread. Thanks to all of you I was able to recognize the early stages of heat exhaustion and get help fast and I'm doing great now :)
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: DonaCatalina on June 23, 2010, 11:38:06 AM
Closing weekend at Scarborough was officially 99 degrees, but my car said it was 101.
We nearly drank the pickle man dry because the bilge water (gatorade) ran out.
Most people don't realize that for a $2 tip he will fill your cup with luscious pickle juice which you can dilute with 1/2 water and share with a friend.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Merlin the Elder on June 23, 2010, 01:15:34 PM
I thought it felt a tad warm that weekend, Dona. Nimue and I spent a lot of time at the FoF pavilions or just sitting in the shade somewhere.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Sir Kentaslas on July 24, 2010, 04:11:41 PM
Even though this isn't ren-related, I feel I need to say thank you to everyone who posted on this thread, it saved my life today.

I live in Texas, were the only thing higher than the temp is the humidity percentage. I'm from around Houston so it gets pretty bad here during the summer.



Hey, fellow Texan! Alright! *high-five*

Yeah, I can sympathize. I'm from Corpus Christi. Summers are like 105 degrees with 100% humidity. Pretty dismal.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Rowan MacD on August 09, 2010, 04:39:03 PM
    Hot temps and humidity this year in the Midwest have been brutal.   My A/C crapped out and I have to wait 2 days for a repairman.  There are so many systems going out.   
  Right now, static temps are in the 90's and the heat indices (feels like temps) haven't dropped out of the 100's in a month. It's so bad that I fear that more than a few cases of HS will be inevitable this season at faire.
   Please, please dress as lightly as possible, and everybody make sure we know where the first aid tent is and watch each other for signs of illness.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Becky10 on October 14, 2010, 01:41:29 AM
Talking to the doctor and what not and she said that chocolate milk is actually very good for dehydration and heat stroke. Who woulda thunk?
Heres an article that kind of mentions it.
http://www.fitnessmagazine.com/recipes/healthy-eating/superfoods/chocolate-milk-after-workout/
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Sir Dougie Zerts on January 03, 2011, 06:24:16 PM
There's always the Drench a Wnch dunk tank! ;D
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Merlin the Elder on January 10, 2011, 09:23:11 PM
Just thought I'd let everyone know... There's little chance of heat stroke this week at faire for two reasons: 1) It's 26 degrees out, and 2) I don't think there are any faires being held this time of year.  I just wanted everyone to have a nice relaxing Sunday evening...
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Dinobabe on January 11, 2011, 05:39:03 PM
I believe you can still get heat stroke when it's cold out.  If you exert yourself too much and don't cool down properly.  There is also something else that can happen when you get really hot when it's cold outside but I can't remember what it's called.  So do be careful!
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: NoBill Lurker on January 11, 2011, 07:10:10 PM
I believe you can still get heat stroke when it's cold out.  If you exert yourself too much and don't cool down properly.  There is also something else that can happen when you get really hot when it's cold outside but I can't remember what it's called.  So do be careful!

Hypothermia I think... ???
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: dfloyd888 on January 17, 2011, 09:10:06 PM
Hypothermia is one, pneumonia is another.  This is why, cold is one thing, wet is another... but combine the two, and one needs to be VERY careful and stay warm.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Scotty Hunter on April 23, 2011, 04:31:34 PM
I completely ruined a day at faire when I had heat stroke hit me at about 11:00 (My fault did not eat or drink anything that morning and we do live in Florida). I ended up having the first aid guys (which were at least cute) lay me out on a blanket under a tree giving me water and one of the vendors brought me some fresh fruit. I was there for a good hour until my friend was able to pack me up in the car and take me home. On the funny side I was a fairy that year and of course had to remove my wings and they were laying next to me. You would hear people joking telling kids I was having medical attention because some one tore my wings off, or "this is what happens to the mischievous faeries!"

I know the above quote is a bit old, but I was just now reading over this very informative thread and the above really made me laugh!! Poor injured fairy had her wings tore off! :o


I've never been one to drink alot of water, but this year I have been working on changing that very bad habit of mine. I usually grab a soda instead of a bottle of water.  It's just been a bad habit I've been doing for years and has gotten to the point of a real addiction where if I don't drink, say, 5-6 cans of soda a day I have horrid headaches. I don't smoke, don't do drugs and only drink socially, so my addiction has been soda. Almost as damaging as drugs can be, I swear!

I plan on hitting some Faires this summer as a plain-clothes observer, and having lived through several months in Las Vegas Nevada with no air conditioning and no electricity for fans, I do know the importance of staying hydrated and fed after that experience, which I don't care to repeat.  My mother almost passed out at one point, which scared us both into taking the heat a little more seriously, and to force ourselves to always ignore the sugary sodas and go for a bottle of water instead.

This is an extremely helpful, informative and very important thread!
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: MrHyde on July 13, 2011, 01:15:34 PM
Don't forget how heat can effect diabetics as well.  Heat stroke is still an issue for them but the increased sweat can also cause your sugar levels to fall extremely quickly.  Diabetic coma in the back of a faire is not fun.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: daggrim on July 30, 2011, 01:16:53 PM
Wow, a long running topic here.  When I was in the military, on training exercises in the central valley of CA, we soaked shop rags in water and tied them around our necks.  Every couple hours, they just needed a resoaking.  It must cool the blood going through your neck, but it made a noticeable difference. 
Doug 
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Merlin the Elder on July 30, 2011, 02:24:46 PM
Wet towels around the areas of major arteries is a big help. Ice (or cold pack) on the inside of your wrist, on your neck (jugular), or if you're in a private space, on your femoral artery. The concept here is that these are where the highest volume of blood pass near the top of the skin layer... The top of the head is a super spot to place a cold washcloth. In general, keeping your head covered is important.

This has been a horrendous year for the heat. I'm ready for the next Ice Age...
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Captain Teague on July 30, 2011, 02:40:37 PM
It's likely already been mentioned a million times, but the Cool Dannas work fairly well too. Neck or head wraps with gel inserts that activate by placing in cool water. I see another place has played off that type and call them cool downz instead. They have a very wide variety of designs, which I am sure will help to blend in with a lot of garb. ;)

http://www.healthandbodystore.com/coolingaids.html?gclid=CM2aiY7oqaoCFQoJ2godb0NYUw (http://www.healthandbodystore.com/coolingaids.html?gclid=CM2aiY7oqaoCFQoJ2godb0NYUw)
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Lady Gryphon on July 30, 2011, 05:30:24 PM
I just ordered us two neck rolls one in white and one in tan, two pair of memory foam inserts for our boots and an cold pack, which I always need after a day at fair.  They take PayPal, so this is good.  I'll let you all know what I think.

But don't forget the Pedialyte powder you can get at wal-mart.  Little packets you can put in your pouch and mix in a bottle of water.  Best stuff ever recommended to me.  I have them in our garb box.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: daggrim on July 31, 2011, 04:48:13 PM
Great link, thanks.  I'm gonna order some neck thingies for me and my helpers.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Adriana Rose on August 05, 2011, 11:44:43 AM
Those cool wraps work great! If you can wrap them around your middle to get your core heat down, or if your in a bodice around your leg just above the knee to get cooled down that way.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Rowan MacD on August 05, 2011, 12:50:40 PM
I just ordered us two neck rolls one in white and one in tan...They take PayPal, so this is good.  I'll let you all know what I think.
 How long does it take to get these?  Let us know as soon as you try them out.  I will be ordering at least 5 if you say they are worth it!
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: dreamwalker on October 30, 2011, 06:34:40 PM
Yeah for hotter Faires leek Scarby dress in a couple light flowly layers. Lay off the soda, stick to water but ok to grab a coke on your way out. Try to sit in the sahde make frequent breaks etc. Last time I was a Scarby they had what looked like a human "car wash" misty thing for cooling off.

On the other side of things; Cold Faires like TRF and Sherwood layering and staying dry in the key. Microfibre cloaks are awesome things. I've worn up to 4 layers and still been cold. Had a cold, numb arse after sitting down to watch a show (and I'm not lacking for natural padding in that dept) I've worn modern half slips under under my chemise with gowns and full length kilts just for one more layer and I'm sure it helped a little. Probably adds to the effect when you walk (for ladies) and nobody can see it so noone is the wiser.

I'm guessing warm beverages leaded and unleaded are not going to hurt wither with the cold. 
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: DonaCatalina on March 22, 2012, 11:41:27 AM
Since the weather is truning decidedly warmer It's probably time to discuss heatstroke.
First and foremost don't push yourself too hard and drink plenty of water.

Heat stroke is a form of hyperthermia, an abnormally elevated body temperature with accompanying physical and neurological symptoms. Unlike heat cramps and heat exhaustion, two forms of hyperthermia that are less severe, heat stroke is a true medical emergency that can be fatal if not properly and promptly treated.

Symptoms of heat stroke can sometimes mimic those of heart attack or other conditions. Sometimes a person experiences symptoms of heat exhaustion before progressing to heat strokes.

Symptoms of heat exhaustion include:

nausea,

vomiting,

fatigue,

weakness,

headache,

muscle cramps and aches, and

dizziness.
=============================================================
Cooling measures that may be effective include:

cool, non-alcoholic, non-carbonated beverages, as directed by your physician

rest

cool shower, bath, or sponge bath

an air-conditioned environment
It is that time of year again.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Rowan MacD on June 17, 2012, 04:59:26 PM
  Bumping this..Just about became a casualty the first faire of the season.  Unusually hot and humid, and we kept getting stopped on the way to shade and seating.   Fortunately, I knew the early symptoms, and excused myself to go sit and take some water.

 Be careful!
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Merlin the Elder on June 17, 2012, 05:12:45 PM
The best thing is to not get into the situation. That means, when it's really hot—or you're wearing a lot of garb—back off of the alcohol, if you're a drinker—and keep water with you at all times. Sip frequently.  Pinch the skin in the web of your thumb and forefinger (on the top of your hand). If it slowly returns, you are dehydrated and need water, at least, and possibly electrolytes.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Rowan MacD on June 17, 2012, 07:23:46 PM
  Yes, indeed.  One of the biggest reasons I don't usually drink at faire (the other being I am usually the DD).
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: kcdcchef on June 18, 2012, 12:34:16 PM
yeah it's why i amke all my visits to faire in the late fall. much cooler out.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Orphena on July 24, 2012, 08:24:05 AM
As this is one of the hottest summers - a great review. Thanks for all the tips!

 I wanted to share with you all a way to create your own neck coolers - for those of you wanting to save money (Even if it is only shipping) - or wanting to match your garb. These can also be shaped to be used on whatever part of your body required. It requires some simple sewing - but all the seams are straight, so it is the easiest type of sewing. I will give detailed instructions for the neck roller, and allow you to modify based on need for other parts of the body!

You will need fabric, and "water beads" - available in craft stores in the floral department, or dollar stores, or even places like Walmart. These are tiny pellets that expand when you put them in water, often used for decoration in vases. Here is a link that shows them - please note I do not endorse this company - I have never used them, it was just the first google result! http://waterbeads.net/shop/

Take a rectangle of fabric - 100% cotton or linen is best, but even a cotton poly blend will work. (In a pinch, you can use a bandana - just make sure it is long enough!) Your rectangle should be about 14 - 18 inches by 4 or 5 inches. (If anyone who tries this wants to modify the measurements, feel free - I am currently away from my measuring tapes and fabric!). Sew the 2 long sides together, making a seam. You now have a long tube. Flip it inside out so that the seam is on the inside, then sew ONE end together. Insert about a teaspoon (rough estimate!) of water bead pellets into the fabric, measure about 2 or 3 inches up, and sew another seam from one long edge directly across to the other long edge. Repeat until you get to the end, sewing compartments with pellets in them, finally closing the end. This will keep your water beads well distributed. When you want to use it, soak in ice water for about 30 minutes or so. The pellets will expand, soaking up the ice water. Drape around your neck, and you will stay cool for several hours. Keep a couple in the bottom of a cooler to soak up all that ice melt and change as necessary!

We use these at our Pirate Festival in August, and it keeps people nice and refreshed. A word of warning, however - they do tend to leak a bit, so try it out before you do this with garb. I prefer NOT to use this when in noble, but m'lord does enjoy it on some occasions! Just thought I would present a DIY solution for those who wanted!
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: mehan on July 24, 2012, 10:05:47 AM
Jeez, I have been waiting all spring/summer for this topic to come up again - hoping someone would bring up the dark yellow urine again so I could say  ((drum roll))


but my urine is always BLUE at faire  ::)

**ducks and runs for cover**
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Docamor on August 16, 2012, 11:04:18 PM
WE have sworn by a product called Sqwencher's that is a hyped up version of Gatorade or Emergen-C.  It was developed for use in the Steel Mills of Pittsburgh and has a good taste, comes in a powder that can be mixed easily with water.  It helps restore the electrolytes.  On warm days I am almost never without water in my chalice, I have been known to pour it down my doublet, into my headgear, to help cool down.  The berry flavored Sqwenchers look a lot like wine!!   And the ice tea ones can bear a resemblance to some craft beers.  Some of our vendors keep bins with ice water handy backstage where we can literally put our entire foot(boots and all) in to cool off.  It feels wonderful.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Rosie Nell on December 27, 2012, 04:46:56 PM
It gets dangerously hot down here in Texas, and I have no shade at the spot I work at TRF. I always kept Gatorade on hand, and drank enough to wet my mouth every few minutes. Another thing I did was on my lunch break I would get watermelon and chew on that most of the day. Something I learned in class for heat emergencies (and from having no air conditioning in my car) is to splash water on your skin and fan it. Especially in the neck and chest area. Cold packs in the chest, armpit and groin area will also help cool someone down.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Aderin on May 19, 2013, 04:03:56 PM
all excellent ideas!

hydration is all about salt, salt, and more salt. You'll be thirst and craving water but that sweat is really comprised of a lot of salt! So balance your salt/water intake.

And yes, HEAT stroke will be inevitable unless you can keep yourself cool with shade, cold packs and ice. They are even making clothing that is designed to keep you cool at sporting good companies.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Amras Elfwine on May 19, 2013, 04:07:27 PM
Stay in the shade as much as possible, wear loose fitting, comfortable garb that breaths, and most important, don't overdo the alcohol. Always have a bottle of water for every ale/cider/wine you drink, and don't over imbibe on the hooch.
Most faires probably do as Maryland does: The medical/EMT booth has several coolers of ice water they keep filled and cold all day, and its free for the taking, so you don't even have to buy water.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: DonaCatalina on May 20, 2013, 05:15:07 AM
One of the beverages that we have added to our Faire days is G2. It doesn't have the sugar overload of Gatorade and it helps keep those electrolytes in balance which plain water doesn't do as well.
(http://i.walmartimages.com/i/p/00/05/20/00/20/0005200020972_500X500.jpg)
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Aderin on May 20, 2013, 05:48:30 PM
Wow, thanks for the g2 info. Good to know! Always hated the sugar/meal part of gatoraid
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: captmarga on May 20, 2013, 08:27:12 PM
Here are some of my tips. 

Your garb should be of breathable fabrics to start with.  How to test?  Hold the fabric over your mouth, and breathe through your mouth.  If you can't breathe through it, the fabric isn't breathable.

Limit your layers if possible.  On truly hot days, leave off the greatcoat or oversleeves.

Grommet your hats to vent them.  Wear a wet rag under them if not, and keep it damp.  Take your hat off when you can to vent the heat.

Sunscreen.  Burned skin will make you hotter.

Under-Armor type clothing.  Cut the neck out and wear it under your normal layers.  It can help!

Hydration - if it tastes good (Gatorade/powerade/pickle juice) you probably need it.  Superhydrate during the week, as we all know how we HATE to go pee in costume. 

For every tankard or mug-ful of non-water, have one of water.  Save the beer or mead for later in the day, and then in moderation.  It dehydrates you faster!

Ice or cool rags on your neck, wrists, and head.  Ladies, a cigar tube with cool water down the cleavage can do wonders, but ASK FIRST, because some people cannot handle the temp change.  Don't just pour cold water on someone unless you ask or are directed to in a life-threatening situation where their temp must be lowered rapidly.

Find a spot with a breeze to let your skirts air for a bit - gents, remove your coat or loose the laces on your jerkin.  Loosen your belt for a few minutes.

Eat light!

Stay healthy at faire!!!

Marga
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Aderin on May 23, 2013, 11:00:24 AM
as someone who, while working faire, almost went to the ER for OVER-hydrating, make sure you eat salty foods!! water alone will just make you sick from over-hydrating your cells. I started to feel DRUNK and WOOZY and I had to go to the medic tent. EVEN THEY tried to give me more water. I ended up getting it out of my system (albeit unpleasantly) but thank goodness I did because I survived (thanks to friends and saltine crackers):) Haha, I'll never forget my neighbors reaction to me coming home, falling down to the grass in my front yard and vomitting like crazy in my robin-hood costume. Don;t see that everyday. Shoulda been on youtube! haha
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Lady Renee Buchanan on May 23, 2013, 09:00:24 PM
Last year at the Janesville RF, it was insanely hot for  mid-May.  So bad that we only went to 1 show and spent most of the day sitting at a picnic table in the shade.

One of the vendors had a couple of women working.  We struck up a conversation about the heat, and the mentioned that when it's really hot out, they always go as pirates.  When I asked them why, the said.  They wear a pirate bandana under their hats, and they soak the bandana in cold water first.  Nobody notices that the bandana is wet.  I tried it later in the summer, and it really worked!

I am also a fan of the wet towel around the neck.  We say that I am the best dressed lady in dish towel!
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Aderin on May 24, 2013, 05:16:21 PM
Last year at the Janesville RF, it was insanely hot for  mid-May.  So bad that we only went to 1 show and spent most of the day sitting at a picnic table in the shade.

One of the vendors had a couple of women working.  We struck up a conversation about the heat, and the mentioned that when it's really hot out, they always go as pirates.  When I asked them why, the said.  They wear a pirate bandana under their hats, and they soak the bandana in cold water first.  Nobody notices that the bandana is wet.  I tried it later in the summer, and it really worked!



I am also a fan of the wet towel around the neck.  We say that I am the best dressed lady in dish towel!

Thanks so much for the bandana trick. WOuld not have thought of that myself!
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Rowan MacD on May 29, 2013, 01:26:24 PM
As this is one of the hottest summers - a great review. Thanks for all the tips!

 I wanted to share with you all a way to create your own neck coolers - for those of you wanting to save money (Even if it is only shipping) - or wanting to match your garb. These can also be shaped to be used on whatever part of your body required. It requires some simple sewing - but all the seams are straight, so it is the easiest type of sewing. I will give detailed instructions for the neck roller, and allow you to modify based on need for other parts of the body!

You will need fabric, and "water beads" - available in craft stores in the floral department, or dollar stores, or even places like Walmart. These are tiny pellets that expand when you put them in water, often used for decoration in vases. Here is a link that shows them - please note I do not endorse this company - I have never used them, it was just the first google result! http://waterbeads.net/shop/ (http://waterbeads.net/shop/)

Take a rectangle of fabric - 100% cotton or linen is best, but even a cotton poly blend will work. (In a pinch, you can use a bandana - just make sure it is long enough!) Your rectangle should be about 14 - 18 inches by 4 or 5 inches. (If anyone who tries this wants to modify the measurements, feel free - I am currently away from my measuring tapes and fabric!). Sew the 2 long sides together, making a seam. You now have a long tube. Flip it inside out so that the seam is on the inside, then sew ONE end together. Insert about a teaspoon (rough estimate!) of water bead pellets into the fabric, measure about 2 or 3 inches up, and sew another seam from one long edge directly across to the other long edge. Repeat until you get to the end, sewing compartments with pellets in them, finally closing the end. This will keep your water beads well distributed. When you want to use it, soak in ice water for about 30 minutes or so. The pellets will expand, soaking up the ice water. Drape around your neck, and you will stay cool for several hours. Keep a couple in the bottom of a cooler to soak up all that ice melt and change as necessary!

We use these at our Pirate Festival in August, and it keeps people nice and refreshed. A word of warning, however - they do tend to leak a bit, so try it out before you do this with garb. I prefer NOT to use this when in noble, but m'lord does enjoy it on some occasions! Just thought I would present a DIY solution for those who wanted!

Bumping your neck cooler post:  I made a couple of these and they are soooo easy, I tested them and they work fine, though I have yet to actually use them in the field, since it has not been that hot yet here.

 Additional Notes:  After you make the bands only use a scant 1/4 teaspoon of the smallest hydro beads you can find (Hobby lobby floral) in each 1.5"x3" compartment.  They will barely cover the bottom seam of each compartment.  They get BIG.
  If you have any doubts about how large they get-place a couple in a cup of water and come back in an hour (they grow to about marble size). 
   A package costs 2.99 and contains about a tablespoon of dry beads. More than enough for 2-3 neck coolers.

   I made my 'test' band from scraps in my rag bag, fashioned 5 compartments and added beads to each before sewing shut, and soaked it for an hour.  It was firm, tight and full of water, with just the few beads I used.

   Added bonus: You can blot them almost dry before use!  The beads do not leak water and the cover is all that really gets wet when soaking in ice water. 
    If you use a thin cotton, it will air dry in a few minutes, but the water packed beads stay cold.   If you want one for later-get one of those freezable wine bottle sleeves (Target and HyVee)  and keep them cold in that. If they are dry before stowing, then they will be dry and cool when you need them.   No water stains!

   I hung my tester up with a clothespin to observe the aftermath.
   After about 5 days the beads had returned to their previous tiny size, and according to the package, you can use them over and over.
   I would hang them up to dry them to prevent algae formation, but the package also states they can be rinsed off if they get dirty (like in a vase) so I figure if you wash them off after each use, you are good to go.
   They pretty much have an indefinite life span, and only cost maybe .50 to .75 cents to make.

Thank you Orphena!
 
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Aderin on May 30, 2013, 01:15:47 PM
^ sensational idea! I'm avid to try it!
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: StilettoWolf on May 30, 2013, 06:12:54 PM
I'm tempted to make all our pirates new neck bandanas now.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: darkranger on June 04, 2013, 05:23:01 PM
I understand the need for water...but food, water,rest, and lots  of training. Just listen to your body and have fun.... for me its 2 or3 beers then slash of water, hang out in the pubs a cool off. ::)
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: StilettoWolf on June 09, 2013, 09:40:07 PM
Random. But something I used to do as a belly dancer when we had summer performances at arts festivals on black top asphalt streets. I would chill a few cans of spicy hot v8 and  add one of the to go salt packets to it and drink that over ice once or twice a day. Kept my salt intake in good measure and the veggies helped with potassium and other good electrolytes. And it's pretty refreshing. Plus the little cans are very light and can fit in anyone's hip bag or skirt pocket.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Rowan MacD on August 26, 2013, 08:41:39 AM
  !!! Bumping this post again-Heat advisories in the Midwest!! Temps in the 90's and humid!
  I just made a green satin version of this 'tie-style' neck cooler to match my garb, I'll be carrying a cold sleeve in my basket to re-cool it.
 
As this is one of the hottest summers - a great review. Thanks for all the tips!

 I wanted to share with you all a way to create your own neck coolers - for those of you wanting to save money (Even if it is only shipping) - or wanting to match your garb. These can also be shaped to be used on whatever part of your body required. It requires some simple sewing - but all the seams are straight, so it is the easiest type of sewing. I will give detailed instructions for the neck roller, and allow you to modify based on need for other parts of the body!

You will need fabric, and "water beads" - available in craft stores in the floral department, or dollar stores, or even places like Walmart. These are tiny pellets that expand when you put them in water, often used for decoration in vases. Here is a link that shows them - please note I do not endorse this company - I have never used them, it was just the first google result! http://waterbeads.net/shop/ (http://waterbeads.net/shop/)

Take a rectangle of fabric - 100% cotton or linen is best, but even a cotton poly blend will work. (In a pinch, you can use a bandana - just make sure it is long enough!) Your rectangle should be about 14 - 18 inches by 4 or 5 inches. (If anyone who tries this wants to modify the measurements, feel free - I am currently away from my measuring tapes and fabric!). Sew the 2 long sides together, making a seam. You now have a long tube. Flip it inside out so that the seam is on the inside, then sew ONE end together. Insert about a teaspoon (rough estimate!) of water bead pellets into the fabric, measure about 2 or 3 inches up, and sew another seam from one long edge directly across to the other long edge. Repeat until you get to the end, sewing compartments with pellets in them, finally closing the end. This will keep your water beads well distributed. When you want to use it, soak in ice water for about 30 minutes or so. The pellets will expand, soaking up the ice water. Drape around your neck, and you will stay cool for several hours. Keep a couple in the bottom of a cooler to soak up all that ice melt and change as necessary!

We use these at our Pirate Festival in August, and it keeps people nice and refreshed. A word of warning, however - they do tend to leak a bit, so try it out before you do this with garb. I prefer NOT to use this when in noble, but m'lord does enjoy it on some occasions! Just thought I would present a DIY solution for those who wanted!

Bumping your neck cooler post:  I made a couple of these and they are soooo easy, I tested them and they work fine, though I have yet to actually use them in the field, since it has not been that hot yet here.

 Additional Notes:  After you make the bands only use a scant 1/4 teaspoon of the smallest hydro beads you can find (Hobby lobby floral) in each 1.5"x3" compartment.  They will barely cover the bottom seam of each compartment.  They get BIG.
  If you have any doubts about how large they get-place a couple in a cup of water and come back in an hour (they grow to about marble size). 
   A package costs 2.99 and contains about a tablespoon of dry beads. More than enough for 2-3 neck coolers.

   I made my 'test' band from scraps in my rag bag, fashioned 5 compartments and added beads to each before sewing shut, and soaked it for an hour.  It was firm, tight and full of water, with just the few beads I used.

   Added bonus: You can blot them almost dry before use!  The beads do not leak water and the cover is all that really gets wet when soaking in ice water. 
    If you use a thin cotton, it will air dry in a few minutes, but the water packed beads stay cold.   If you want one for later-get one of those freezable wine bottle sleeves (Target and HyVee)  and keep them cold in that. If they are dry before stowing, then they will be dry and cool when you need them.   No water stains!

   I hung my tester up with a clothespin to observe the aftermath.
   After about 5 days the beads had returned to their previous tiny size, and according to the package, you can use them over and over.
   I would hang them up to dry them to prevent algae formation, but the package also states they can be rinsed off if they get dirty (like in a vase) so I figure if you wash them off after each use, you are good to go.
   They pretty much have an indefinite life span, and only cost maybe .50 to .75 cents to make.

Thank you Orphena!
 
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: DonaCatalina on August 27, 2013, 06:28:05 AM
Here are some of my tips. 

Your garb should be of breathable fabrics to start with.  How to test?  Hold the fabric over your mouth, and breathe through your mouth.  If you can't breathe through it, the fabric isn't breathable.

Limit your layers if possible.  On truly hot days, leave off the greatcoat or oversleeves.

Grommet your hats to vent them.  Wear a wet rag under them if not, and keep it damp.  Take your hat off when you can to vent the heat.

Sunscreen.  Burned skin will make you hotter.

Under-Armor type clothing.  Cut the neck out and wear it under your normal layers.  It can help!

Hydration - if it tastes good (Gatorade/powerade/pickle juice) you probably need it.  Superhydrate during the week, as we all know how we HATE to go pee in costume. 

For every tankard or mug-ful of non-water, have one of water.  Save the beer or mead for later in the day, and then in moderation.  It dehydrates you faster!

Ice or cool rags on your neck, wrists, and head.  Ladies, a cigar tube with cool water down the cleavage can do wonders, but ASK FIRST, because some people cannot handle the temp change.  Don't just pour cold water on someone unless you ask or are directed to in a life-threatening situation where their temp must be lowered rapidly.

Find a spot with a breeze to let your skirts air for a bit - gents, remove your coat or loose the laces on your jerkin.  Loosen your belt for a few minutes.

Eat light!

Stay healthy at faire!!!

Marga
Just a word of warning- The original Gatorade may be too high in sugar and starch for a lot of people. There are now oodles of alternatives with less sugar... G2, Sobe and Vitamin Water.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Rowan MacD on August 29, 2013, 03:59:49 PM
 We only drink water at faire when the temps are over 80.
I just finished 3 more neck coolers from scraps of white linen, and blue cotton.   I will bring a 6 pack cooler with ice to soak them in.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Rowan MacD on September 02, 2013, 06:45:13 PM
  Neck coolers worked wonderfully-I gave away two.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Sigundo on June 24, 2014, 07:08:11 PM
Ok, I gotta ask this (I'm sure its been addressed before), but WHY can't (some) faires be held in the cooler months? Extensive research by myself indicates that during the renaissance, they had four seasons. Winter was a bit harsh,  but spring and autumn sounded great temperature-wise. If I win the lottery (sure, that'll happen ::)) I will see what I can do about hosting a faire in the high 50's/60's just to see if anybody would show...  My son-in-law's brother suggested faires under the "dome", but I think that would take away a lot of the fun/atmosphere of the faire.

On the other hand, I still try to go during the hot months (as I have little choice), but stick with peasant clothing as its light and breathes, ducking into shade whenever possible.. I have a cloak, but its never been used.. someday perhaps..

Climatizing yourself for a few weeks by spending more and more time in the heat also tends to help me a bit. Hiding in the air conditioning all year and then going into the 90's is rough on your body. I  usually do 3 weeks, but then most people probably spend a lot of time in the sun and don't need to climatize. Since I went on the insulin pump, I try not to stay out in the heat (over 85 degrees) on a regular basis. Though I do have one of those FRIO bags and a pouch cooler for the actual faire day. When I'm "practicing" for the heat, I disconnect the pump and just don't eat carbs of any kind..
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: PollyPoPo on June 25, 2014, 06:34:21 AM
Ok, I gotta ask this (I'm sure its been addressed before), but WHY can't (some) faires be held in the cooler months? ... someday perhaps..



Actually, the list of this year's faires shows quite a few held September through November in the US.  December/January is kind of sparse, but that could be due to the holidays.  February/March shows the AZ faire, but Sherwood Forest Faire also runs February through March. 

For someone to plan a faire during February/March anywhere except maybe California would be very iffy as to weather.  Low temps might not be unwelcome for faire-goers, but the likelihood of heavy rains, flooding or snow would put a severe damper on anyone planning a faire in the Midwest, Rockies or Eastern parts of the country.

It all depends on what part of the country and the usual weather patterns. 
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Rowan MacD on June 25, 2014, 10:04:42 AM
   This Spring has seen some unusual weather in the Midwest this year.   We went from near drought to flooding in less than a month.  Some areas are seeing 5"+ of rainfall at a time.   
  Early Fall (Sept-October)and late Spring (May-June) faires as least tend to include a cool weekend as well as a warm one.    Anything earlier than April outside southern California, the deep South or Florida, will rarely be even comfortably warm.  Most  people are not going to take the family to an outside venue in a Blizzard or when then site is still experiencing hard frost overnight.
  The rule of thumb here is: Hold your faire during planting and harvest-the Farmer knows best.    It's not a good idea to schedule anything outside from mid June through August-it's always hot and humid.
  I would like to see someone organize a midwinter faire somewhere inside up here.  The cost for the venue and climate control would be the biggest hurdle.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Sigundo on June 25, 2014, 11:26:38 AM
I suppose that is all part of it. I personally am comfortably warm in anything from say 47 (with no wind) to 72 (with a breeze). Anything lower than that and its time for long sleeves or above that and its time to sweat. Keep forgetting that I'm not quite normal. I catch a lot of flak during the summer for the complaining, and some of my co-workers put on a light coat anything below, say, 65. Then fall and winter arrive and I get to poke fun at them putting on a parka to go outside to have a smoke or something and its 60 outside. I enjoy the great outdoors in the spring and fall the most.

Obviously I didn't mean winter... the crazy weather the last few years would mean you would be stuck in snowbound roads in the northern half of the country. I'll check on those southern faires though. Limited funds would mean losing the close ones (Kentucky, Ohio, Tennessee) and going to a distant one or two, but might be worth it for the comfort. Then again, Kentucky has the Dickens festival, that I've not attended yet... course if November in Arizona is the same as June-July in Kentucky that wouldn't really make a difference...hmm... lots of study to do while I wait for my lottery ticket to win. haha.

Oh, almost forgot. I have to add 8 degrees or so to the climatological records as any faire I attend on any given weekend will show an 8 to 10 degrees micro heat wave during my visit. Last one was even higher, at Scarbourough Faire where it was 92 when I went then 72 the following weekend, but SOME of that was just Texas, not all me.  ::)
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Merlin the Elder on June 27, 2014, 12:58:33 PM
It snowed at Scarby on opening weekend a few years back, and the vendors said it was even colder the second weekend. I went the third weekend, and it was upper 80s.

Sherwood Forest, same deal. I've been there for the sleet on opening weekend, and also 80s...February in Texas.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: Hoowil on August 11, 2014, 03:57:01 PM
Out here we have pretty much all soft site faires, and most are only a single weekend. That said, with 200 miles or so, there is a faire every month starting in March and ending in November. I haven't made it to the last one, but I know the one in Sonora in March has had some freezing weather (literally) and even snow. I think a lot o faires run during the summer so as to not conflict with holidays, and to allow a greater flexibility of camping and breaks for students. Or it could be because rain and faire dust = mud.
Title: Re: Avoiding heat Stroke at Faire
Post by: LadyStitch on August 12, 2014, 08:47:09 AM
I plan our clan yearly trek to TRF.  We generally go the same weekend every year.  We have had years where we have had people nearly have heat stroke the first weekend on November, and the next we had 35 degree weather.  I have to plan for everything. There is a reason that we have both gatorade and hot chocolate packets in our camp kit. 

I'm debating making my own hat chillers. We bought some from a vendor a couple years ago but they have been used to death.  I will say on days over 80 they are a life saver for us. The trick will be how to do something like that for the fuzzlet.