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Faire Garb => Sewing => Topic started by: Lady Kathleen of Olmsted on August 05, 2009, 12:14:23 AM

Title: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Kathleen of Olmsted on August 05, 2009, 12:14:23 AM
I know that there has been several threads on doing Cartridge Pleating. Hopefully with many new members that have joined this wonderful community who sew, allow me to assist you. To the "seasoned" sewers, never too seasoned to learn a few new tricks.

Cartridge need not be hard to do. It is time consuming, yes, but so worth it.

Here goes in layman's terms.

1) When doing Overskirts that require Cartridge pleating, decide how many panels of fabric that will be pleated and proper length that also includes 2" for a hem and 1/2" for the top seam. One guide I use is 2 to 3-60" wide panels sewn together or 3 to 4-45" panels. Be sure all seams are serged, hems are done. Less panels if one has a smaller waistline.

2) Fold over each opening end 6", sew 1/2" at the top to make a facing like finish. Do the same at the hem bottom of 2". When folded over, there should be clean edges. Tack down with a Cross Catch or whip stitch to secure the folded over panels.

3) With the 1" wide Gingham, cut 4" long pieces that will be the same as the part of the skirt that will be pleated. Be sure to have each piece be the same. I make sure the first row is of the lighter gingham squares. What I recommend that the 1/2" squares be sewn together at the salvage 1/4". That way, you have an actual 1" square that will be a continuous pattern from end to end.  Be sure to add an additional square at each end to fold over.

IMPORTANT: Be sure to start with a light or dark square and end with the same square. That assures even pleating.

4) Underline with one layer of Cotton Canvas Duck of the same length and width of the gingham for  stability. Baste together and serge all side edges.

5) At the top of the skirt, pin and sew gingham pleating guide. 1/2" seam allowance. I also recommend Under stitching to hold down the bulk of the seam. Whip stitch the folded over part of the guide to the fabric. Whip stitch or do the Cross catch stitch to secure the pleating guide to the fabric. You will be happy that you di

(http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc6/6331_138448181279_2409161_n.jpg)

You can see the Under Stitching at the top of the guide and make out the cross catch stitching at the bottom.

6) Depending on which hand you use, make your first row of stitching with a heavy thread on the top of the first row of squares. I sew under the light squares and over the dark ones. Each of the 3 rows of hand stitching should be the same. Be sure to measure enough thread for when you have to pull.

(http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc6/6331_138448186279_3908985_n.jpg)

You can see the running pattern throughout. This is how it should look.

7) For your waist band, be sure to underline that also with a layer of Cotton Canvas Duck. The weight of the skirt will need that extra support. Waistband should be at least 2" wide when folded over. I serge the edge. That gives me a good guide to use when stitching the pleats to the waistband. You may need to tie off your ends and save the thread for sewing.

8) Have the waist band facing you. Pin the folded edges in place at each end of the waist band, then ease in the rest of the skirt to fit. Pin in places to secure the skirt. 3 to 4 stitches per pleat of double thread.

(http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc6/6331_138448191279_8193995_n.jpg)

This is the finished result. Comes out every time. The fingers are screaming bloody murder. But one gets those perfect pleats every time. Be sure to remove the bottom two rows of  hand stitching once the skirt has been finished to the waistband. That allows the pleats to relax a bit.


How I get the trims onto the skirt? I measure 7 1/2" from the serged edge of the overskirt and mark with a Tailor's chalk. Place the trim along the chalked line and sew.

(http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc6/6331_138448201279_1731875_n.jpg)

That way, I leave a bit if the fabric to seperate the trim from the fabric of the Underskirt.

Hope these tips help.

Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: operafantomet on August 05, 2009, 07:07:37 AM
Cool instruction, I especially like the chequered fabric in the waistband - it shows exactly what's going on and how the end result should look. Very informative!
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Genievea Brookstone on August 05, 2009, 10:44:12 AM
Thank you Lady K for the tutorial!  Never would have thought to use the gingham and ease the headache of measuring.

My question is do you  use one continuous piece of thread for each row of pleating?  I always seem to end up with knotty thread and having several start/stops.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Margaret on August 05, 2009, 10:59:23 AM
I tend to use one continuous strand of thread per row of stitches.  Yes you do need to watch the knotting, but the results are smoother with less chance of a knot slipping and the pleats falling.

It's funny that some people see cartridge pleating as 'hard to do'.  I have a friend who I am currently trying to dissuade.  I keep telling her that it can be a bit time consuming and tedious, but it is not 'difficult' and the end results look fantastic.

Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: bellevivre on August 05, 2009, 11:02:23 AM
Can you visually demonstrate how to sew the pleated fabric to the waistband? that always seems to be my hangup- I had once been told to do it at a 90 degree angle, but that just seemed... wrong...
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Kathleen of Olmsted on August 05, 2009, 11:45:11 AM


1) When I thread the rows, I measure one long continuous thread with a little left at the ends.

2) If the width of the Overskirt is 4 1/2 yards, for example, I cut a thread of 4 3/4 yards. One has to be careful about knotting. I seldom have that problem when using Upholstery or Heavy Button thread.

3) With the waistband facing you, pin the folded front sides first, then ease in the rest of the skirt. Pin in places to hold the skirt to the waistband. 3 to 4 stitches per pleat should be strong enough. I suggest the Blanket stitch. It's a stronger stitch and less likely to come undone.

Hope this helps.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Genievea Brookstone on August 05, 2009, 01:26:09 PM
Ladies you are so awesome.  Thank you!  I have learned so much from everyones tips and techniques.  One last question lol do you use double or single strand with the heavier thread?  Single would seem like there would be less chance of knotting?
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Margaret on August 05, 2009, 01:38:38 PM
I use embroidery floss, the full strand.  Using a big upholstery needle helps too.  Less time spent fussing getting the eye threaded.   :D
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: bellevivre on August 05, 2009, 01:42:26 PM
embroidery floss is a good idea- in the past I used buttonjole twist, but you could always see it...

what i mean about my waistband question:

are the waistband and the pleats butting against each other? or does the waistband come down on either side of the top of the piece of fabric like an ordinary skirt? this and arms-eyes always drive me batty!
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Katie Bookwench on August 05, 2009, 01:55:48 PM
I use embroidery thread too - but halved - three of the six strands --to attach the skirt. I've never had a problem with my pleats tearing out.

I use the curved apolstery needle-- I use the 5" size. My good friend Wayward Wench turned me on to them. It takes a little getting used to, but once you get the hang of it, it works great!

I've found though, that you need to pull each of your stitches TIGHT so that they're less visible from the outside.

I have a trick for keeping the knots on the pleat (guide) lines from pulling out. I tie a pretty bead on the end of the line. Once I finish sewing the skirt to the waistband, and adjust the pleat lines, I tie a matching bead on the other end(s) of the line. They make a pretty touch to the skirt once I'm done.

Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Katie Bookwench on August 05, 2009, 02:09:05 PM
embroidery floss is a good idea- in the past I used buttonjole twist, but you could always see it...

what i mean about my waistband question:

are the waistband and the pleats butting against each other? or does the waistband come down on either side of the top of the piece of fabric like an ordinary skirt? this and arms-eyes always drive me batty!

The finished edge of the pleats sit against the outside of the waistband.

For instance - I put my skirt on the table, right side facing UP, and place my waistband over the top edge of the skirt, right side DOWN (so, right sides facing), I sew the top edge of the skirt to the bottom edge of the waistband.

Looking at the table from the side, it looks kind of like this:

_________________________________________  <-- waistband (bottom edge)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^  <-- skirt pleats (top edge)
************************************* <-- edge of table
*************************************

Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Margaret on August 05, 2009, 03:11:26 PM
Yep - Katie's got the way of it!

I have a skirt that I need to pleat and then sew to a waistband.  Just let me know if I should post photos of it, or if Katie's graphics did it for you.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: bellevivre on August 05, 2009, 03:17:28 PM
If you dont mind? particularly of the actual connecting stitches- i dont know if I'm just doing mine in a stupid way or what...
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Margaret on August 05, 2009, 03:18:56 PM
No problem hun.  I can do it when I get home.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Blue66669 on August 05, 2009, 03:40:20 PM
See, this is why I'm getting my gown made for me...
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Genievea Brookstone on August 05, 2009, 03:44:00 PM
See, this is why I'm getting my gown made for me...

LOL
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Katie Bookwench on August 05, 2009, 04:22:45 PM
See, I keep asking Maggie to make my garb for me but she steadfastly refuses me every time.

Something selfish about having her own garb to make... *humph*

 :-*
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Margaret on August 05, 2009, 05:37:49 PM
/Mags snickers at the Katie....    :-*

OK - here we go.  I am using orange embroidery floss for demonstration purposes only and I only did a bit as I don't want orange floss on my pretty purple skirt when it's done.   :D

Here's the skirt to be attached to the band and the finished waistband
(http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y15/Sweete-Ladye/Garb/pleating1.jpg)

Lay skirt on a table or board, then lay the waistband on top of the pleats - right sides together.  You will be sewing the pleats to the bottom edge of the waistband.
(http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y15/Sweete-Ladye/Garb/pleating2.jpg)

Start by putting your needle through the first pleat and up through the waistband.  Bring the thread around and go through the pleat up through the waistband again.  (I'm a double stitcher.)
(http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y15/Sweete-Ladye/Garb/pleating3.jpg)

Continue on to the next pleat - always going up through the top part of the pleat up through the waistband until your skirt is all attached:
(http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y15/Sweete-Ladye/Garb/pleating4.jpg)

Once you are done, the outside of the skirt will look like this:
(http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y15/Sweete-Ladye/Garb/pleating5.jpg)

There's my way of doing it.  I hope this helps explain a bit more.
Here's the link that taught me how to cartridge pleat:  http://www.elizabethancostume.net/cartpleat/index.html
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Katie Bookwench on August 05, 2009, 05:53:15 PM
All right, you pernicious harpy..... I'll sew my own garb if I must.  ;D *sigh*

Well... now show the inside too, just so people can see it how it looks from the 'wrong' side- that's what really made it *click* in my head.

perhaps when you're finished with the correct color floss.

Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Margaret on August 05, 2009, 08:57:08 PM
Ah end your rattlin' on there...

Fine - here's the inside of a completed skirt;

(http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y15/Sweete-Ladye/Garb/pleats6.jpg)

And the outside;

(http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y15/Sweete-Ladye/Garb/pleats.jpg)
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Dinobabe on August 06, 2009, 09:18:58 AM
So the pleats sit on top of the bum roll and that is what makes them stick out?
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: bellevivre on August 06, 2009, 09:32:37 AM
ok, so the stitches are GOING to show- that's what i couldnt ever figure out- I never seemed to see anyone elses stitches, so i thought i must be doing something wrong... but then, i was using buttonhole twist on dark fabrics! Will go with floss and that should fix my problem- huzzah!

may just be making my red and black tudor this season AFTER ALL!!!
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Margaret on August 06, 2009, 09:51:30 AM
So the pleats sit on top of the bum roll and that is what makes them stick out?

Yes, the bumroll does help.  Also, you can add a layer of padding such as duck cloth or even thin quilt batting to give the pleats more 'poof' and more ability to stand out on their own.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Margaret on August 06, 2009, 09:55:30 AM
ok, so the stitches are GOING to show- that's what i couldnt ever figure out- I never seemed to see anyone elses stitches, so i thought i must be doing something wrong... but then, i was using buttonhole twist on dark fabrics! Will go with floss and that should fix my problem- huzzah!

may just be making my red and black tudor this season AFTER ALL!!!

I can't wait to see it!

My stitches always do show on the outside.  I try to make them inconspicuous as possible, but they do show a bit.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: LadySeasan on August 06, 2009, 11:16:59 AM
ok, and apparently i still suck at cartridge pleating, and will never try again!

well no, thats not true about trying again, but i cant guarantee that i will no longer suck at it!!!
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Kathleen of Olmsted on August 06, 2009, 12:33:57 PM


I recommend using a thread color close to that of the fabric the Overskirt is made out of if at all possible. That way, the stitches do not show. Mine don't.

As for the pleats themselves, the use of one layer of Cotton Canvas Duck provides the pleats with that stabillity.

Happy Cartridge Pleating ladies. Practice! Practice! Practice!
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Jon Foster on August 06, 2009, 10:25:21 PM
My wife has been working on a pleating method she likes for a while now. I think her finished pleats look fine but she's never satisfied with them. I think this thread is giving her some new insight.

Jon.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Marietta Graziella on August 07, 2009, 09:25:16 AM
Hallaluiah!   (think I spelled that wrong)

My stitches always show and it was making me crazy!   I'm glad it's not just me.  :) 

To wrap up and confirm:
1.  Embroidery floss (3 or more strands) is a good thread to sew skirts to waistband/bodices-tons of colors to choose from!
2.  2-3 stitches PER pleat to ensure strength
3.  Boost pleat stability with cotton duck, or thin batting (I use scrap fleece strips)
4.  1" gingham for even pleating
5.  Remove 2nd and 3rd row of pleating thread AFTER skirt is attached to waistband/bodice

What did I miss?!
 
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Margaret on August 07, 2009, 09:57:00 AM


What did I miss?!
 

6.  Enjoy the Ohhhhh's and Ahhhhhh's you recieve from others.   ;D
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Kathleen of Olmsted on August 07, 2009, 11:46:12 AM
(http://photos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs189.snc1/6331_139716926279_568686279_3751263_7284007_n.jpg)

A Cartridge Pleated Overskirt I did back in January using the method of this thread.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: WaywardWench on August 08, 2009, 10:16:59 AM

My stitches always show and it was making me crazy!   I'm glad it's not just me.  :) 

To wrap up and confirm:
1.  Embroidery floss (3 or more strands) is a good thread to sew skirts to waistband/bodices-tons of colors to choose from!
2.  2-3 stitches PER pleat to ensure strength
3.  Boost pleat stability with cotton duck, or thin batting (I use scrap fleece strips)
4.  1" gingham for even pleating
5.  Remove 2nd and 3rd row of pleating thread AFTER skirt is attached to waistband/bodice

What did I miss?!


Only sew the TOP loop of the pleat to the bottom of the waistband, right side to right side.
(I've seen only the bottom pleat sewn and the skirt looked really strange.)


Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Marietta Graziella on August 08, 2009, 10:29:21 AM
YES!  Good point to make.  Only sew the "top" side of the pleats. 

I can't even figure out how you'd wear it if you sewed the "bottom" side.   :-\
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: WaywardWench on August 08, 2009, 04:05:49 PM
I wanted to say something to the lady. I could see she had worked so hard on a very pretty gown. I could think of no way to point out what I percieved as an error without sounding completely snarky.

I have seen the bottom attached to the bottom, but then the top is attached where it hits the middle of the waistband to give it more of the right angle effect.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Kate XXXXXX on August 08, 2009, 05:46:34 PM
This is the way I have done it, too.  I used carpet thread!  Bit like sewing with rope, but black on black really doesn't show...   ;D

And as a quicky for stage use I have used  the light weight  curtain tape...  Roman Blind tape works well.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Tixi on August 24, 2009, 04:08:06 PM
i've used matching upholstery weight thread before with good results - and long strands of it definitely won't snap/break even with heavy fabrics

I've used matching colors, but clear might be nice, too, if such a thing exists
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Aunty Lou on August 24, 2009, 04:40:13 PM
Unfortunately, the only clear thread I've ever seen in the retail shops is way too light to hold cartridge pleats, and fishing line may be strong enough, but it shows as a shiny glitter.  (Not bad if that's also in the fabric, but do you want glitter at the top of your pleat?)
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: NicoleBridget on August 31, 2009, 10:16:03 AM
I have a question for you seasoned seamstresses...I have a feeling it's a dumb one...but if fabric is 60" wide straight off the bolt, and you're not doing side gores, is there a need to cut it apart and sew it back together as panels?
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Kate XXXXXX on August 31, 2009, 01:31:52 PM
Only if you want an opening up the centre back...
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Syrilla on September 01, 2009, 08:28:18 AM
Because of weight and materials I normally sew my tops and bottoms to the waistband.  I do allow room on the band for this.  It also helps when I throw it in the washing machine to keep things straight.  :D 

The use of panels is mostly for shaping the material, so you have less at the top than at the bottom.  If that is not an issue, then go ahead!  If I use panels it will be from a side seam area to a front side seam to allow room for the reducing bum roll at the front.  I can have some pretty big bum rolls.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Margaret on September 01, 2009, 10:29:56 AM
I am short, so if I use a fabric that I don't have to cut, I don't.

For example;  If my fabric for my skirt is a plain blue linen and 45" wide off the bolt, I just use it as it is.  That way I have the selvedge egdges and it saves me time by not having to finish the edge or hem it. 

I like that.   ;D
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: NicoleBridget on September 01, 2009, 01:37:10 PM
Thanks girls.  I don't know why but I had it in my head that the "right" way to do this was always to panel it, so that's what I did for the project I'm currently working on.  Turned out that, after some mishaps in pre-washing, the pieces were too short and I ended up sewing them together the other way.  Yes, the way it came straight off the dang bolt.  *Slaps forehead*  Thanks for your input, I'm looking forward to not making so much unnecessary work for myself in the future!
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Marietta Graziella on September 01, 2009, 04:57:19 PM
Remember, if your fabric suddenly seems too short, add a guard to the bottom.  A matching color, a contrast color, the same color!  Whatever you like.  It's H/A.  You can always put trim over the seam line.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Tixi on September 01, 2009, 06:30:00 PM

Guards are almost always a good idea anyway whenever they don't affect the overall theme too much
It's far easier to change out a guard (when they inevitably get dirty, torn, etc) than to have to replace the whole skirt.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: NicoleBridget on September 02, 2009, 09:26:06 AM
Very good points, I hadn't thought of that!  Love your profile Tixi BTW...
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Tixi on September 02, 2009, 01:10:58 PM
Very good points, I hadn't thought of that!  Love your profile Tixi BTW...

Aww that's very nice of you to say - thanks Nicole =)
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: gem on May 04, 2010, 04:50:37 PM
I am bumping this up, as I'm getting ready to try this for the first time.

One bit of confusion: unlike most skirts, where you sew up all the seams of the skirt (so you have a tube) BEFORE pleating, am I right in thinking that this is done while the panels are still one flat length? Then if you're making a closed skirt, you sew up that last seam at the end?

I'm also confused about how you hem a skirt *before* attaching it to the waistband and trying it on. Is that necessary?
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Kate XXXXXX on May 04, 2010, 06:54:21 PM
You CAN do all the seams if you want to: you just start and finish the pleats at the opening.

To hem the skirt beforehand, you need to know the finished length.  You can do this by putting on all the underpinnings and popping the nekkid waistband round your waist.  You then drape the tape measure over your farthingale and bum roll and under petticoat to the desired hem length at CF, each side and CB, and make a note of the numbers.  You can then finish your hem before doing the waistband.  It's easier in some ways, as it's always easier to manipulate something flat than something gathered or pleated into a bunch.  The other advantage is that if you have a border print or straight guards or braid to put round the hem, you can have a straight hem and adjust the length for accommodating the bum roll etc. from the top, like fixing the kilt length.  You do the same measurement but measure UP from the hemline and make a curved top.  It's not usually so curved that it distorts the cartridge pleating noticeably.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Kathleen of Olmsted on May 04, 2010, 09:44:37 PM
I am bumping this up, as I'm getting ready to try this for the first time.

One bit of confusion: unlike most skirts, where you sew up all the seams of the skirt (so you have a tube) BEFORE pleating, am I right in thinking that this is done while the panels are still one flat length? Then if you're making a closed skirt, you sew up that last seam at the end?

I'm also confused about how you hem a skirt *before* attaching it to the waistband and trying it on. Is that necessary?

gem....

By following the Gingham Method for Cartridge pleating, I always hem the skirt before I pleat it. I use the Cross Catch Stitch.

Knowing the finished length of a skirt with Farthingale or petticoats on helps in knowing how deep of a hem to make, let alone cutting the skirt panels the correct length to begin with. My hems are 2" at the most.

Hope this helps.

As for a closed skirt that is going to be cartridge pleated, one can hem first
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Rebecca on September 27, 2010, 11:28:50 PM
Bumping this again

I'm about to try my first cartridge pleating, and I have two questions -
1) about how long should the fabric be (width-wise at the waist) that needs to be pleated? I have about a 40" waist.
2) I happen to have some gingham duck, but the checks are only 1/6" each. Would it be easier to just go out and find some 1" squares instead, or will this work?
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: LadyFae on September 27, 2010, 11:36:07 PM
Bumping this again

I'm about to try my first cartridge pleating, and I have two questions -
1) about how long should the fabric be (width-wise at the waist) that needs to be pleated? I have about a 40" waist.
2) I happen to have some gingham duck, but the checks are only 1/6" each. Would it be easier to just go out and find some 1" squares instead, or will this work?

Giggles had small checks too so she went thru with a Sharpie and made 1" slashes (or something like that, anyway!)
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: gem on September 28, 2010, 02:12:20 AM
For the Much Ado skirts, I folded over 3" on the muslin one, and decided it was more than enough. I only did 2" on the linen one.  (I hope that's what you're asking. I was a little confused by "how long, width-wise.")

I did 1/2" pleats. You should be able to just catch every third (or sixth) square, for half-inch (or inch-wide) pleats, right?  The third ones will be easy to eyeball; if you're doing every sixth one, you might mark them.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Rebecca on September 28, 2010, 07:39:50 AM
Actually, what I meant was how many yards of fabric will I need to gather for the skirt? Lady Katherine said 3 60" panels, but I didn't know if she meant 60" wide at the waistband, or long to the floor. If it's wide, then I guess that's 180", or 5yds?
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Rosalind on September 28, 2010, 09:05:46 AM
Actually, what I meant was how many yards of fabric will I need to gather for the skirt? Lady Katherine said 3 60" panels, but I didn't know if she meant 60" wide at the waistband, or long to the floor. If it's wide, then I guess that's 180", or 5yds?

It's fabric widths. 3 panels of 60" wide, or 4 for 45". For lightweight materials, I sometimes do 5 panels of 45" wide, so hoops won't show, and use wool felt to pad the pleats. To find out how long your lengths need to be, put on your hoop and underskirts, and have someone measure you from waist to where you want your hem to end up. Add 3 inches for the pleating area, and three for the hem.

I must be weird, as I mark my hems last, after the cartridge pleating is done and attached to the waistband. The reason for this is that I want the pleats to be on grain for structure, but I want the hem to be softer looking. I throw the hoop and skirts on the dress-form (or before I got a dress form, I used a round side-table, stacked my bum roll on it, and stacked the table on boxes so the top of the bumroll was waist high - worked great!), and use board-game boxes as hem guides while pinning. I press the hem, then use my rotary cutter and salem rule to trim the excess (this takes practice, but it's fairly quick). I leave 3 inches for the hem, turn over 1/2 inch, then sew. Big confession - I machine sew my hems, then cover it with trim on my noble garb. It's faster.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: gem on September 28, 2010, 12:33:31 PM
On Lady K's advice, for my Much Ado skirts, I used 5 yards (I did panels for one, and straight uncut yardage for the other). I have a 28" waist, and my MIL's is 32". It is a LOT of fabric, though, so I think 5 yards would certainly be plenty for you, as well, particularly if you're using something heavy/thick.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: ladyharrogate on September 28, 2010, 11:06:48 PM
glad this got a bump!  I do all my cartridge pleating by hand and have thought of using gingham but the thought slipped my mind before I tried it.  Thanks!!!
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Kathleen of Olmsted on September 29, 2010, 10:04:21 AM


Going back to page 1 of this thread on the Gingham method works every time for even cartridge pleating and less hassle overall.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: gem on September 29, 2010, 11:44:23 AM
Lady K, I'm really looking forward to trying it! For the Much Ado skirts, the white fabric was too sheer to use anything in the fold, so I marked thirty yards of tiny dots every half inch by hand!  ::)
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Kathleen of Olmsted on September 29, 2010, 12:45:51 PM
gem!! 

For white fabric, the gingham would have shown through even had you used pink or yellow..
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Rebecca on October 01, 2010, 01:21:15 AM
My pleats are done! Now I have to attach it to the waistband. I'm so proud of myself! I think they turned out pretty nice. Pictures to follow at some point.

Do you do cartridge pleating on the underskirt, or just gore it?
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Kathleen of Olmsted on October 01, 2010, 06:11:09 AM


I use the Margo Anderson Underskirt pattern that calls for gores in places and then knife pleated.

From my experience, only the Overskirt is Cartridge pleated.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Rebecca on October 17, 2010, 12:49:05 AM
As per Rani's request, pictures of the inside of my cartridge pleated skirt:

Me wearing it inside out:
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v723/bgirl781/P1110554.jpg)

Laying flat, the inside of the skirt:
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v723/bgirl781/P1110555.jpg)

An aerial view:
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v723/bgirl781/P1110556.jpg)
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Rani Zemirah on October 17, 2010, 12:59:46 AM
Oh, wonderful!  Now I have an excellent visual for reference!  Thank you so much, Lady R! 
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Rebecca on October 17, 2010, 01:32:30 AM
No problem! I must say, it is very odd to wear cartridge pleats inside out over a bum roll.

And on a related note, I will never go bum roll-less again! When I first put the skirts on tonight, I had forgotten the bum roll. And the cartridge pleats just didn't get a chance to shine!
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Luciana on October 17, 2010, 01:45:44 AM
Thank you Lady R! This is most helpful.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Kathleen of Olmsted on October 17, 2010, 07:57:39 AM


I am glad that this thread has been resurrected to help others tackle this particular technique.

It's not all that difficult, just time consuming and so worth getting pleating done right.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Catharine on October 17, 2010, 08:40:04 AM
Lady R-
Ive never worn a bum roll..

Only a hoop..

If u wear the br- does it appear more like  a farthengale, without the very bottom wire showing thru?

I now am looking into a heavy, but breathable fabric to eliminate this.

Also, does it give more room @ the waist/hips?

gramercy

LC
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Rebecca on October 17, 2010, 10:22:34 AM
On me (since I already have a bit of a natural bum roll), I feel like it makes my waist look tiny. I've never had a problem with my hoops showing through, since I have a ruffled farthingale, but it lets the cartridge pleating stand straight out (pretty much at a right angle from your waist), before falling to the hoop. Instead of a simple conical silhouette, it almost seems like a baby catherine wheel, though not so big. The next time I try stuff on, I'll take pictures of what the skirt looks like both without and with the bum roll.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Isabella on October 17, 2010, 02:28:30 PM
I agree! Bumroll + cartridge pleats = looks awesome!!!
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Sorcha on January 29, 2011, 08:37:49 AM
<Dig, Dig, Dig...>  I dug this one up because it's such a great reference.

One question I didn't see covered here was, Where do you start and end your pleats?  I'm seeing a lot of photos with the pleating starting basically under the arm.  I'm sure it depends on waist size and/or where the curve of the bodice begins, but...  Is this somthing everyone just eyeballs?
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Kathleen of Olmsted on January 29, 2011, 10:11:10 AM
2) Fold over each opening end 6", sew 1/2" at the top to make a facing like finish. Do the same at the hem bottom of 2". When folded over, there should be clean edges. Tack down with a Cross Catch or whip stitch to secure the folded over panels.

Sorcha!!!  Here is step 2 from page 1 as to where to begin the gingham strip. Actually! Refer to the first post entirely on page 1.

Hope this helps. Thanks for bumping this thread up. It has helped many in tackling the chore that is Cartridge pleating.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Kathleen of Olmsted on January 29, 2011, 10:20:38 AM
The Overskirt that is Cartridge pleated from an Elizabethan ensemble I did for Lady deLaney in 2009. Where the pleating beging as compared to the flat fron panels that split can be seen. Which is why I use the 6" fold over rule.

(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs029.snc1/3183_96848291279_568686279_2958881_1790803_n.jpg)

Using Cotton Canvas Duck to underline the 1" gingham, gives pleats that are even, sturdy, and H/A(if that is what one is going for)

(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs189.snc1/6331_139716926279_568686279_3751263_7284007_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Sorcha on January 29, 2011, 10:23:42 AM
Ahhh...  That makes sense Lady O.  I wasn't sure if that measurement was just to finish the edge or if it was were to actually to start pleating as well.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Rebecca on January 29, 2011, 11:18:50 AM
I just pleated all the way to the center on my overskirt. I think I left about an inch on each side, so that just under where the eyelets on the waistband are was flat. I also pleated all the way to the edges on my 1860s skirt, which has a back closure.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Rosalind on January 29, 2011, 11:39:25 AM
I just made a cartridge pleated skirt for the Scarlett O'Hara green curtain dress. I used gingham ribbon, as I didn't have time to mark the pleats, or sew gingham strips, along with finished edges on those strips (no serger). Worked a treat, and has enough body that it worked quite nicely for my purposes. However, unless you get the ribbon on sale, it costs a bit more to do it this way.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: gem on January 29, 2011, 11:50:50 AM
Sorcha, I think whether to leave part of the front unpleated--and how much--is largely an eyeballing/personal preference thing. I've seen everything from skirts that are pleated the whole way round, to side-opening gowns that are entirely unpleated at the front, and only pleated from the side openings back, and any number of things in between.

I don't have a picture of this, but I'm making a kirtle at the moment (knife pleated, but with a flat front), and the bodice conveniently has two seams in front (roughly the same place princess seams would be). I'm starting the pleats at those seams, since it seemed like a logical marker and an easy guide. For reference, on me, that's leaving about 8" unpleated in front.

There was a thread way back about middle-class skirts (http://www.renaissancefestival.com/forums/index.php?topic=10339.0), and it has some really wonderful photos. I'd started it because I was admiring a flat-front skirt that Tigerlilly had posted... and then Cilean came and posted a bunch more photos, including one of my favorites--a wine-colored kirtle from Kentwell with long sleeves and a flat front. It's a great reference that shows a ton of different options.

***
Lady R, I have a spool of gingham ribbon I bought on sale, but so far have only made super lightweight CP skirts, so haven't needed to pad my pleats (and also the skirts were WHITE so anything would have shown right through!). But you're right--if you *can't* pad the pleats it takes absolutely forever to mark all that yardage!! Margo Anderson recommends using the perforated side-strips of old-fashioned printer paper--and when I was cleaning out my office last week, I found some old college papers and very carefully salvaged those strips! LOL
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: gem on August 17, 2012, 12:46:21 PM
Thought it was a great time for giving this classic thread a BUMP!

(And also I was totally surprised to see that apparently I have a spool of gingham ribbon somewhere in my stash... Ha!)
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: insidiousraven on August 17, 2012, 01:44:11 PM
The pictures are broken on my end :(
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: gem on August 17, 2012, 03:55:51 PM
I think Lady K has removed some of her initial photos--this thread is three years old, after all! (Do you get broken links? All I see is empty space where the pictures once were!)

If you look at page 5, though, you can see how Lady Rebecca used the gingham in a skirt.

The actual pleating part is really straightforward, just 2-3 rows of identically-spaced running stitches. Great basic how-to here, on the Elizabethan Costuming Pages: http://www.elizabethancostume.net/cartpleat/  It's a mindlessly simple technique, but it is TEDIOUS. Lady K's idea to face the pleats with gingham will eliminate the really time-consuming part, marking all the dots for the stitches, since you just follow the pattern of the gingham.

I've done several cartridge-pleated skirts, but I'm getting ready to finally try the gingham method for the first time.  I could take some pictures, but I am a total newbie at this technique, so I don't know how helpful they'll be!
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Kathleen of Olmsted on August 18, 2012, 03:49:42 AM
(http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc6/6331_138448181279_2409161_n.jpg)

(http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc6/6331_138448186279_3908985_n.jpg)

(http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc6/6331_138448191279_8193995_n.jpg)

Here are some of the photos that may have been erased. Showing how using the 1" Gingham makes for easier Cartridge Pleating and consistent pleats. I use a layer of Cotton Canvas Duck to give the pleats support.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: gem on August 18, 2012, 07:18:24 AM
Thanks, Lady K! I love how it makes stripes when it's all drawn up.  :D
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Rowan MacD on August 18, 2012, 10:55:45 AM
The actual pleating part is really straightforward, just 2-3 rows of identically-spaced running stitches. Great basic how-to here, on the Elizabethan Costuming Pages: http://www.elizabethancostume.net/cartpleat/  It's a mindlessly simple technique, but it is TEDIOUS. Lady K's idea to face the pleats with gingham will eliminate the really time-consuming part, marking all the dots for the stitches, since you just follow the pattern of the gingham.
I've done several cartridge-pleated skirts, but I'm getting ready to finally try the gingham method for the first time.  I could take some pictures, but I am a total newbie at this technique, so I don't know how helpful they'll be!
   I used gingham the first (and so far only) time I did cartridge pleats for an MA overskirt, and I will always use it.  I can only add one other piece of advice that I haven't really seen described anywhere.  Maybe it's so obvious it's never mentioned, or first timers are expected to figure it out for themselves:
 
  I was pleating 6 yards of materiel, and found it much easier to pleat in sections, instead of trying to do three-6 yard long rows of running stitches.
  The above link on the Costumers Page, gave me the idea in the section where they describe attaching the finished pleats to the waist band to get even results.
   MA's directions for this overskirt of 6 linear yards would have you run 3 continuous lines of running stitches, along the length of the fabric, and then pulling them all into pleats at once.  Didn't work for me.  I tried doing it her way 2x, always got a snarl in all that thread, and wasted about 3+ hours of my life.
  MA did hint at a different technique involving running the thread directly off the spool, but I don't know it, and she doesn't bother to describe it.  I'm getting used to that.
  Anyway, I found that by running 3 lines simultaneously (using 3 needles/3 threads with 4-5 feet of thread on each one) for a couple of feet, then drawing them together into pleats, then continuing the same for the next few feet till done worked a whole lot better.  Simple.  The thread is till continuous, but you don't have 5-7 yards of it to deal with,  just 4-5 feet.
   You shorten and tie off the threads as you would normally, once the pleats are distributed the way you want them.
   I was done pleating the whole thing in about 40 minutes.  Took a bit longer than that to attach the gathers to the waistband, since I was double stitching every loop due to the heavy material, but I was done with everything in 90 minutes.  I used trouser hooks for the front closure. 
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: gem on August 18, 2012, 12:02:12 PM
I like to run the thread directly off the spool, too. There's no trick to it--you just don't cut it (just like on a sewing machine). That way there's no end to get lost or tangled or pulled through, and you only end up using exactly as much thread as you need. (Although I once accidentally cut my thread ends too short, which made them harder to deal with later.)

The heaviest fabric I've done so far is some medium-weight damask, so I haven't had issues with thread breaking or needles... but if you're working with really heavy fabric and stubborn thread (I use upholstery thread, but Lady Margaret suggested all 6 strands of embroidery floss, which would NEVER EVER BREAK), you can condition the thread to behave better by running it through some beeswax (or a product called Thread Heaven). You can find them easily in the quilting section; hand-quilters use them to get their quilting threads to glide more smoothly through the fabric and tangle less.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Rowan MacD on August 18, 2012, 06:36:50 PM
  I don't run it off the spool, I just thread 3 seperate needles with 4-5 feet of thread and string the pleats onto the thread, sort of like you would drapery sheers on a curtain rod.
  It's what works best for me and I get the same results. ;D
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Margaret on August 19, 2012, 09:10:39 AM


The heaviest fabric I've done so far is some medium-weight damask, so I haven't had issues with thread breaking or needles... but if you're working with really heavy fabric and stubborn thread (I use upholstery thread, but Lady Margaret suggested all 6 strands of embroidery floss, which would NEVER EVER BREAK), you can condition the thread to behave better by running it through some beeswax (or a product called Thread Heaven). You can find them easily in the quilting section; hand-quilters use them to get their quilting threads to glide more smoothly through the fabric and tangle less.

The most and heaviest fabric I have stuffed in to a 30ish inch waist band is 5 yds of unlined velveteen.  I attatched it to the waist with 2 stitches to each pleat and have never had anything pull off or have the thread break - just as Gem said.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Kathleen of Olmsted on August 19, 2012, 12:45:20 PM
I noticed that the photos in my intial first post were missing. I redid the photos on Page 1 for all to see as to how I Cartridge Pleat.

The technique works every time. Time consuming to do, but the pleats come out even and the desired look is there.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: gem on September 12, 2012, 09:22:02 PM
Laying flat, the inside of the skirt:
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v723/bgirl781/P1110555.jpg)

I know it's been a while since Lady R popped her head in here, but I'm gonna say this anyway: I am SO glad you posted this particular photo, because without it, I was just about to sew my waistband on inside-out!  :o
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Irma on May 22, 2013, 03:55:30 PM
These comments and photos are so helpful.  One question about attaching the skirt to the waistband - how deep of a "bite" do you take for the stitches?
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: isabelladangelo on May 22, 2013, 06:02:41 PM
Hi Irma and welcome to the boards!

You might want to start a new discussion as the last time anyone posted to this thread before you was almost a year ago.  I've noticed a lot of new people coming to the boards lately and bringing up old "dead" threads so don't worry; however it would be helpful for people if you created a new thread, introduced yourself, and explained what you mean by bite.  ;-)  Most people just fold the fabric for the pleating and whip stitch the pleats to the waistband.   
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Kathleen of Olmsted on May 23, 2013, 01:34:12 AM
So good to see that this thread is still relevant as we have so many new members.

Cartridge PLeating need not be difficult to do. I use the Gingham method. My skirt panels are at most 180" from end to end. THAt would be 3-60" wide panels, plus the desired hem length and 1/2 for the top seam. or 4-45' wide panels. 1/2 seams, finished with a serge to prevent fraying.

Folding over each front panel, 6", I sew 1/2' seam at the top, then turn outards. i measure the lenth from folded edge to folded edge to make my pleating guide. I use the 1" wide Gingham. Underlined with CAnvas, I cut a 4"tall long piece. I make sure I keep my pattern running, and serge all the edges. THe top is 1/2" seam. Understitching helps in having an even smooth finish. I also doa  cross catch stitch to attach the bottom of the guide to the skirt so that it does not flap about.

(https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/6331_138448181279_2409161_n.jpg)

Starting with a dark square at the beginning, i make my 3 rows of stitching usinga  Heavy Upholstery thread. I gently pull to get even pleats to fit unto the waistband i have made before hand. i also underline the waistbandw ith CAnvas to provide  added strength, for the skirt will be heavy.
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/6331_138448186279_3908985_n.jpg)

I make sure the waistband is facing me so that I can sew the skirt using a double thickness of Heavy Upholstery thread and sturdy needle. 4 stitches per pleat is good. 5 is better.

The finished result.
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/6331_138448191279_8193995_n.jpg)

This process is a  long one, but so well worth it. THis is one sure way to get the consistent pleats with less hassle of having to measure.. The fingers are screaming bloody murder afterwards.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Kathleen of Olmsted on May 23, 2013, 01:40:35 AM
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/6331_139716926279_7284007_n.jpg)

The finished result using an Embroidered Dupioni Silk.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Rosalind on May 23, 2013, 09:31:16 AM
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/6331_139716926279_7284007_n.jpg)

The finished result using an Embroidered Dupioni Silk.

Pretty!

The method I use is to sew the inside of the pleats to the outside of the waistband at the bottom, then tip the pleats up against the waistband, and sew the top of the pleats to the waistband as well. This is super-secure, and helps make the skirt look fuller.

I also started using wool felt to pleat instead of gingham. I made a pleating guide with a hole punch and some quilter's template sheets. I mark the felt with a white fabric pen or pencil before attaching it (I think I cut strips 2.5 - 3 inches wide last time). The felt edges don't have to be finished, and since I get undressed/dressed as part of my renaissance fashion talk, I can show the insides of the skirts to the audience (which is why I originally did it this way!). Plus, my overskirt is silk, so having the wool felt helps pad out the pleats, and provides a sturdy, yet soft, base for the stitching. Just pick a felt color close to the color of the skirts (not necessarily the same color, if no one is going to see it). Not much is needed. Get a good quality acrylic felt off the bolts at JoAnn Fabrics, you really only need about 1/4 - 1/3 yard so it won't be that expensive.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: gem on May 23, 2013, 11:43:23 AM
The method I use is to sew the inside of the pleats to the outside of the waistband at the bottom, then tip the pleats up against the waistband, and sew the top of the pleats to the waistband as well. This is super-secure, and helps make the skirt look fuller.

Lady R, would you happen to have a photo of this? I'm having trouble picturing it. Or, that is, what I'm picturing can't possibly be what you mean. ;)

I'm *really* tempted to try drapery pleating tape, after seeing a couple of different costumers' work using it. For me, the worst part of cartridge pleating is marking the dots, and this looks even one step easier than the gingham method--plus as a bonus it pads out the pleats a little:

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_s4EkMTyD-mk/SuDjFY-wwEI/AAAAAAAAAH8/V3YybQeiE4o/s320/drape+tape.jpg) (http://imlivinghistory.blogspot.com/2009/10/landsknecht-dress-diary-hanne-v1-part-2.html)

It comes in different widths; Amazon has 3" for $1.75/yard (http://www.amazon.com/Pencil-Pleat-Shirring-Tape-sold/dp/B004KM3BWI/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1369326934&sr=8-3&keywords=drapery+pleating+tape).

***
I've also been thinking about Irma's question regarding the depth of the stitches attaching the waistband to the pleats. There might be a guideline for how large those stitches should be, but I think it's one of those things you kind of get a feel for by *doing* it. Like hemming a skirt, it's going to depend somewhat on how thick your fabrics are--I'd take deeper stitches for that thick wool in the pleating tape photo, than I would for, say, lightweight linen.

It's really helpful to do a practice swatch before you dive into a skirt, just to see how the technique behaves. Just whip together a sample waistband and cut some scrap fabric (about 36x10" or so, so you have plenty to work with) and give it a whirl!
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Rowan MacD on May 23, 2013, 03:14:32 PM
 Drapery pleating tape!  Ingenious!.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Kathleen of Olmsted on May 23, 2013, 07:30:46 PM
I will have to give drapery pleating tape another try if it is softer.

Though what is sold in the Fabric stores is way too stiff and hard to sew onto a waistband. I did a Civil War gown using the tape adn broke several needles in the process. Which is why I like the Gingham and one layer of canvas duck. I have yet to break a  needle.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Orphena on May 23, 2013, 09:13:14 PM
I used drapery tape in my gold skirt! No marking anything! Different tapes produce different looks, so play with them until you find the one you like!
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Wickedvox on May 24, 2013, 09:06:43 AM
Drapery tape?! Forsooth, how doth thou ponder such brilliance gem?! (I'm practicing lol!) I'mma look into this option--I like!
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: amy on May 24, 2013, 10:11:13 AM
I have used drapery tape on most of my gowns as well as Sarah's.   It does make a nice stiff pleat jut be careful how you place it and stitch it in to be sure you don't get a stitch line showing where you don't want it.    It has never failed me and is supremely washable.   
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Irma on May 24, 2013, 12:12:43 PM
The Rowley company has translucent shirring tape.  I bought some a little while ago intending to experiment with pleating a skirt, but haven't done so, yet.  This is the link to the product http://www.rowleycompany.com/products/Translucent-Shirring-Tapes.asp (http://www.rowleycompany.com/products/Translucent-Shirring-Tapes.asp)
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Rosalind on May 24, 2013, 11:01:42 PM
The method I use is to sew the inside of the pleats to the outside of the waistband at the bottom, then tip the pleats up against the waistband, and sew the top of the pleats to the waistband as well. This is super-secure, and helps make the skirt look fuller.

Lady R, would you happen to have a photo of this? I'm having trouble picturing it. Or, that is, what I'm picturing can't possibly be what you mean. ;)


I grabbed my iPad and took a couple of quick pics. It might be hard to see by the light of the hotel room lamp, but here are a couple.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7363/8821150406_9172330836.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/33493800@N04/8821150406/)
Photo May 24, 10 44 19 PM (http://www.flickr.com/photos/33493800@N04/8821150406/#) by LadyRosalindWoodville (http://www.flickr.com/people/33493800@N04/), on Flickr

This is the inside of the skirt.

(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8408/8810564171_a7d6654ec7.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/33493800@N04/8810564171/)
Photo May 24, 10 44 07 PM (http://www.flickr.com/photos/33493800@N04/8810564171/#) by LadyRosalindWoodville (http://www.flickr.com/people/33493800@N04/), on Flickr

You can see the two rows of stitching in this photo.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7302/8821154200_b1a53934dd.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/33493800@N04/8821154200/)
Photo May 24, 10 43 49 PM (http://www.flickr.com/photos/33493800@N04/8821154200/#) by LadyRosalindWoodville (http://www.flickr.com/people/33493800@N04/), on Flickr

Here is the outside of the skirt. Not sure why the part by the trim isn't actually attached... Hmm...
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Marietta Graziella on May 30, 2013, 10:16:04 AM
I used the drapery sheer method on my cartridge pleated skirts. EASY! Super fast and perfectly tidy. I also added a layer of fleece to pad out the pleats a bit when the fabric was thinner. I doubt I'll ever cartridge pleat another way.  :D
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Kate XXXXXX on June 02, 2013, 05:30:14 AM
For 'cheat's pleats' I tend to use the light weight pleat tape for net curtains:

(http://i.ebayimg.com/t/5-metres-of-2-inch-TRANSLUCENT-NET-CURTAIN-PLEAT-/00/s/MTIwMFgxNjAw/z/geUAAOxy~g5RqIHJ/$(KGrHqEOKooFGWwrGOGnBRqIHJUdKQ~~60_12.JPG)

It's less bulky than the standard type.  I did miniature pleating for these sleeves:

(https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/740729_483631548349623_215422697_o.jpg)

Silk taffeta with a cotton sateen lining.  I find Lady Kathleen's lovely gingham method the best for skirts (still using your prezzy, Lady K!  Though now that large gingham is much more available here.  Vendors seem to have got the message!  :D).
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Wickedvox on June 06, 2013, 01:25:59 PM
Here is a link to a phenomenal tutorial on cartridge pleating by Jennifer Rosbrugh: http://historicalsewing.com/how-to-sew-cartridge-pleats (http://historicalsewing.com/how-to-sew-cartridge-pleats)
It doesn't get much better than this...even *I* can follow it lol!
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Rowan MacD on June 06, 2013, 03:24:48 PM
   The only thing that I do differently is that I don't use yards of thread to make the gathers.  My skirt panels were about 7 yards wide before gathering....No way I'm going to try to keep 7 yards of thread untangled while I try to run a stitch the entire length of the skirt panels

  Take two needles (or however many gathering rows you want to do) one for each row.
   Measure out gathering thread the length of your skirt waist band +12 inches for each needle.
   Gather the pleats as you go (I did mine in two foot sections so I could inspect the pleat stitches before I set them) and you won't have yards of wasted thread.  Took me about 40 minutes from start to finish.   

  OR...There is another way to do it with out pre-measuring the thread if you insist on making the looooong running stitches the whole length of the fabric and then gathering them. 
   Do not cut the thread off the spool-Thread the needle onto the end of the thread, then make a large, secure knot.  As you make your stitches, you run the thread off the spool and through the needle as you need more, similar to a sewing machine.  Do this for each row. Proceed to gather as per instructions.
    I think that's how it works.
   

Note: I am so going to try that pleating tape- Joanns does carry it in the drapery dept.
   
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Wickedvox on June 06, 2013, 09:12:46 PM
Great idea on the thread length Rowen! How do you sew with two needles at once??  :o I'm practically a chimp with a bamboo stick poking at an ant hill with just one!
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: gem on June 07, 2013, 06:22:54 AM
Quote
Do not cut the thread off the spool-Thread the needle onto the end of the thread, then make a large, secure knot.

...And where does the knot go?

I run my thread right off the spool, too ("like a sewing machine" is a great way to put it). Easy-peasy.

Glad to know JA has the pleating tape. I need to shorten the skirt I made last year, and b/c it has guards on the hem, I have to do it from the top. I used the gingham method last time, but want to try the tape when I re-do it.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Rowan MacD on June 07, 2013, 09:13:09 AM
Quote
Do not cut the thread off the spool-Thread the needle onto the end of the thread, then make a large, secure knot.

...And where does the knot go?

I run my thread right off the spool, too ("like a sewing machine" is a great way to put it). Easy-peasy.

Glad to know JA has the pleating tape. I need to shorten the skirt I made last year, and b/c it has guards on the hem, I have to do it from the top. I used the gingham method last time, but want to try the tape when I re-do it.
   Gem-I have never actually used the 'off the spool' method for runs over a yard long (the 2 needle one works great for me).
    I asked MA and that's what she told me to do-I assume the knot goes (and stays) wherever you start your run.   I kept getting snags with that method, so I devised my 'divide and conquer' approach instead.  As I go, I can leave the unpleated skirt material rolled up next to me on the couch until I get to it.     
   I haven't been to Joanne's yet, but that tape is on my list! If it works as advertised-it would be more secure than conventional pleating stitches, which can break.   I also like the possibility that you can open the pleats back up at will ,if you leave the drawstring long.
    It would help with alterations (and cleaning) like you said.

Wicked-The two needle method I use is simple (it has to be for me to manage it). and lets me work in a smaller space too.
   You have to have the dots, gingham, whatever you use to mark the pleats in place first so you know where to stitch at.
 You run the row stitches one needle at a time, 18-24" stop- check the stitches to make sure they are exactly even with each other, then draw that section up.  Repeat till done.    It's exactly the same as doing it using 7 yards of thread, but you do it in sections instead of the whole length at once: First needle-run 18" of stitches, stick needle in material to hold it there.
  Take second needle and make second row.  After both are in place, check stitch placement and draw up pleats.
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Rowan MacD on June 12, 2013, 10:52:45 PM
   I got about 10 yards of the pleating tape at Joann's-$1.59 yd.  The cords are stitches in at 1" intervals.
   My tape has 4 rows and is about 5" wide.  No wot see it it works!
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Rosalind on August 06, 2013, 08:40:53 AM
Cross-posted from the In Progress thread, by request:

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7327/9449672388_93eb71173f_c.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/33493800@N04/9449672388/)
Pleating nearly complete! (http://www.flickr.com/photos/33493800@N04/9449672388/#) by LadyRosalindWoodville (http://www.flickr.com/people/33493800@N04/), on Flickr

For those who have been wondering about it, here is a pic of the way I do my pleats, which may illustrate the technique a bit better. Sew the "Valleys" first, then tip the "peaks" up to the waistband, and sew! Enjoy!
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Rowan MacD on August 06, 2013, 10:55:59 AM
  *raises hand*
   How wide is the waist band, and what do you make it with? 
   I've been using 1" belt webbing inside per MA instructions. 
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Rosalind on August 06, 2013, 11:41:08 AM
The waist band is 2 inches wide. I make it by cutting a strip of cotton drill a bit over 6 inches wide for the lining, then folding it into thirds, sewing it like this:

(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3698/9453293830_2998fd8081_c.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/33493800@N04/9453293830/)
waistbanddiagram (http://www.flickr.com/photos/33493800@N04/9453293830/#) by LadyRosalindWoodville (http://www.flickr.com/people/33493800@N04/), on Flickr

I am still working on a diagram for how to add the outer part of the waistband. I'll post that later!
Title: Re: Cartridge Pleating. .A Modern Way to get that "Period" Look.
Post by: Lady Kathleen of Olmsted on November 06, 2014, 11:15:36 AM
I am bumping this up because I had some ask via Facebok on how to do Cartridge Pleating.