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Spanish Noblewoman Help?

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DonaCatalina:
ok. Google Hispanic Costume 1482-1530. The court clothes were much less 'weighty' than what you might find in England at the time. Which is why I love Spanish for hot weather. Women could show their hat under flat caps.
This is a lesser known portrait of Isabella , the wife of Carlos I.
The large silk sleeves (tied on)  are big open bells and there is no under-sleeve.
You can split the dress down the front to add an underskirt; but it's not neccesary. The square neck chemise has full puffy sleeves that are not overly long. Spanish Work embroidery would be found arounf the neckline and sleeve cuffs of the chemise. I find that gimp braid does a good job of mimicking the heavier embroidery on the neckline of the dress itself.
http://www.cheeptrims.com/store/item.asp?Category=20&SubCategoryID=57&GroupID=&SKU=BKM-135
But most of all- have fun and be comfortable.

songbird2353:
Thank you so much for your help, Dona Catalina! *facepalm* I realized I should have specified my fair's time period. We're hanging out with Queen Bess in 1576, so that wonderfully comfortable-looking gown you shared with me might not be quite appropriate. By the look of portraits from that time period though it looks like Spain had either gone into a cold snap or the noble ladies gave up on being comfortable lol.
Would something like this be appropriate? Only I can't find a pattern for the hanging sleeves.



And thank you, Gauwyn, for sending a message on my behalf! <3

 
--- Quote from: DonaCatalina on April 05, 2017, 05:50:10 PM ---ok. Google Hispanic Costume 1482-1530. The court clothes were much less 'weighty' than what you might find in England at the time. Which is why I love Spanish for hot weather. Women could show their hat under flat caps.
This is a lesser known portrait of Isabella , the wife of Carlos I.
The large silk sleeves (tied on)  are big open bells and there is no under-sleeve.
You can split the dress down the front to add an underskirt; but it's not neccesary. The square neck chemise has full puffy sleeves that are not overly long. Spanish Work embroidery would be found arounf the neckline and sleeve cuffs of the chemise. I find that gimp braid does a good job of mimicking the heavier embroidery on the neckline of the dress itself.
http://www.cheeptrims.com/store/item.asp?Category=20&SubCategoryID=57&GroupID=&SKU=BKM-135
But most of all- have fun and be comfortable.

--- End quote ---

Lady Kathleen of Olmsted:
The photo you posted, songbird, looks like the Margo Anderson Lady's Elizabethan  Doublet pattern. That is a great pattern that you can make in a light weight pinwale Corduroy, polished cotton, light weight cotton velveteen.

DonaCatalina:
ah... yes. Unfortunately most of the portraits of Spanish Nobility from the 1570's were done around the Imperial Court in Austria. You can make this dress using a man's doublet pattern and just making the skirt out of 'A' panle.s

Lady Kathleen of Olmsted:
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10154451010111280&set=t.568686279&type=3&theater

A Doublet gown with Spanish sleeves using the Margo Anderson pattern.

I love the Fantasy Fashions Doublet pattern for men, but have not used it for a woman's Doublet. I jut might have to try it.

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