Author Topic: Buying your own sword  (Read 4289 times)

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Offline RenFestHQ

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Buying your own sword
« on: September 10, 2012, 09:50:12 PM »
I am working on an article to help people who are looking to buy a sword
I have started writing the article, but wish to glean knowledge from a larger source
Here is what I have
http://www.renfesthq.com/renaissance-living/where-to-buy-swords/
My goal is to describe the difference in a replica and usable sword. I would like to find a better word than functional, but not sure what to use


Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: Buying your own sword
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2012, 04:48:39 AM »
That video is scary. <shudder>



Your article is probably much needed. You might also point out, and warn others, the fact that even replicas of rapiers usually have enough tensile strength to run someone through with the point. The swordsmiths we know refer to the difference in weapons as replicas and combat ready.
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Offline Chris B

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Re: Buying your own sword
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2012, 07:33:06 AM »
Hopefully you will take my words as my honest thoughts and not as overly critical.  I thought the article was very, very basic and overly simplified.  I think it might be able to help someone who was completely clueless in purchasing a sword, but there is no real meat to the advice beyond generalizations.  Someone spending a great deal of money on a blade would more than likely research it in great detail and not be your target audience, but there are still a lot of choices and options at all price points, even at lower ones.  Replicas and "Battle Ready" swords have a vast range of quality depending on the maker or manufacturer.  For instance, even a "Battle Ready" Hanwei medieval hand and a half sword will not hold a candle to an Albion/Arms and Armor/Del Tin/Angus Trim blade of the same type.   Blade geometry, production methods, weights, center of balance, etc. all play into the decision.  My father, for instance, bought a sword at TRF a few years back that was "battle ready" and was very pleased with his purchase of a "real sword" until he picked up my Albion "Knight" in a Christian Fletcher custom scabbard and belt.  He immediately felt the difference.  

Any simplified article is going to be received at a Kindergarden level of understanding for someone not well verse in the subject compared to understandings at a post-graduate level on sites like myarmoury or the sword forums, but you still might want to add a little more meat to your discussion of the decision process and add more substance to basic things to look for in a new blade.  You might also include links to reputable discussion forums or sites for those that actually would research the topic in more detail before making a purchase.  Even for the lower price wall hangers, there are so many options that it can be overpowering to people.  Hope that gives some constructive thoughts to help you with your article.  Good luck with it.   :)

Addition:  Also, I would not separate categories as replicas and functional swords.  A sword can be functional but not be historically accurate at all.  A sword can be both functional and an exact replica of a surviving historical piece as well.  You might want to discuss "decorative swords" and "functional swords" if you want to simplify it to only two categories.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2012, 07:50:10 AM by Chris B »

Offline Monsignor de Beaumanoir

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Re: Buying your own sword
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2012, 07:42:57 AM »
I would think the word "Functional" is part of the problem here. A ceremonial sword is functional, when it's employed for its intended purpose. "Wall Hangers" are functional when they sit there and show off their styles. Durable and Rugged come to mind as words to use when heading off the "dane" who's going to buy the next "sharpy" and go hack a tree in his yard or go stainless steel to stainless steel with a mate.


The Shop at Home video should be redone as a Public Service Announcement for newb sword buyers.

IMHO.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2012, 08:00:21 AM by Warrior Monk »

Offline RenFestHQ

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Re: Buying your own sword
« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2012, 07:56:23 AM »
@DonaCatalina - That video was very sobering for me as well. I can actually picture someone at faire doing something similar
That is part of the reason for the post, other part was the educate myself. Which I must say I learned a lot when I did some research

@ChrisB - Most of the target audience is going to be for people starting out. Mainly I want to get something in front of an impulsive shopper, who is going to make their decision very quickly.
Essentially I want someone to go to that page with a rudimentary idea of what they want. If they want a sword that looks pretty, then go for a replica sword. If they want to run through their back yard hacking and slashing at things I want them to choose a battle ready sword

I have thought about making a little more advanced article, since this is a subject I have an interest in. But I am not the best writer so it takes me a while to get a post together

Offline Chris B

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Re: Buying your own sword
« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2012, 08:02:58 AM »
If that is your intent and you do not write well...why reinvent the wheel?  There are plenty of simplified articles out there where you can send your readers that have enough information for that purpose.  For instance, an article at http://www.sword-buyers-guide.com/buy-swords-online.html .  

Forgive me for assuming this, but it feels like your own understanding is very basic as well.  If this is correct, why not send your friends to sites that have better information until you have more knowledge and experience?  If you want to learn more, I would highly recommend spending some time reading posts at www.myarmoury.com or www.swordforum.com.  There are very good threads of discussion on those sites with men that are very knowledgeable on the subject.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2012, 08:07:06 AM by Chris B »

Offline Chris B

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Re: Buying your own sword
« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2012, 08:11:02 AM »
The Shop at Home video should be redone as a Public Service Announcement for newb sword buyers.

IMHO.

I have shown my own children that video as an example.  I walked them through my various sets of arms and armor and had the "When I am no longer around" discussion with them for that very reason.  95% of my collection are higher end blades, but there are the occassional lagging pieces that I have owned since I was an adolescent that I want them to understand clearly are never for swinging; let alone cutting. 

Offline temper

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Re: Buying your own sword
« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2012, 01:31:49 PM »
I agree with Chris B about sources at sword Forum and would like to add that other genders subscribe as well.
Temper; what makes a good sword, be sure to keep it.

Offline RenFestHQ

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Re: Buying your own sword
« Reply #8 on: September 11, 2012, 07:01:56 PM »
I agree with Chris B about sources at sword Forum and would like to add that other genders subscribe as well.
I am asking over there as well
I do agree on having women involved as well. At my ren fest, we might have a female dueler this year. I am hoping to get my daughter involved. She is fascinated by pirates (Or has a crush on Johnny and Orlando)

 

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