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Market Square => Arms and Armor => Topic started by: Tammy on January 27, 2009, 07:48:24 PM

Title: Beginner Archery
Post by: Tammy on January 27, 2009, 07:48:24 PM
I've done a google search for beginner bows, but I'm not really finding anything I like. So, I was wondering if someone here could give me a clue.

My dad knows abit about archery, and he said I probably could draw about 35 pounds. I'm 5'4", so dad says long bows are too long.
I like the look of the long bows and the recurves. I think compounds are too modern looking.

Any help, suggestions, and links would be great!!!
Thanks.
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Chris B on January 28, 2009, 07:15:44 AM
It really depends on how much you will actually use the bow.  35# may seem like a light draw weight, BUT if your going to be shooting for hours at a time, even that 35# can take its toll.  Even men use much lighter draw weights for competing in archery than they would for hunting, etc.  35# is roughly the upper weight women use for Olympic Archery to my understanding.

With a compound, you get some "let off" of the draw weight when the cams (wheels on the top and bottom edge of the limbs) roll over at maximum draw so it easy to anchor and hold the weight for the shot.  A recurve on the other hand will have you anchoring and holding the full draw weight of the bow while you take the shot.  It would be far better to go with a better bow at a lower weight you can handle than to buy a higher weight that you will struggle to hold. 

First, you need to figure out your draw length.  Basically, it is the length between your nock and the arrow rest when fully drawn.  That will determine what size bow you need.  Recurves are available pretty much anywhere that sells Archery equipment.  I would start with an inexpensive bow and then graduate to a better one if you really love it.  Even a recurve can get upwards of $1,000 or more for the riser and limbs.  Just do some research on brands and read reviews of the various bows.  Better yet, get to an archery shop and look at various makes.  PSE, Hoyt, Browning, etc. are all good bows. 

I use a 75# PSE Compound for hunting, but am eyeing Grozer bows for a more traditionally made recurve or Crimean/Tartar bow.  If you want to spend a little money and get a traditional bow, check them out.

http://www.grozerarchery.com/index_m.htm
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Cormac on January 28, 2009, 10:33:30 AM
If you have a good traditional archery store in your area this would be the best place to start.  You will need to determine your draw length.  An archery shop will have a bow set up that makes it easy, but you can also do it in other ways.  One is to take your arms and put them out if front of you with palms together.  Place a yard stick so that it is touching your chest and measure where your fingers touch the yard stick.

A recurve or a reflex/deflex bow might be a good choice for you.  They are both more compact than a long bow and because of their design give the arrow a little more "snap" even with a lighter draw weight.

Whatever you go with make sure to pick up a shooting glove and a good arm guard.  I have seen some nasty welts as people learn good shooting form.
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Dinobabe on January 28, 2009, 11:47:19 AM
Or search antique stores for someone's old Boy Scout bow!  That's where I found mine for $15 (it's about 4').  Fiberglass but looks pretty good for wood.  I wrapped the plastic handle in thin leather.  It works great and I estimate it to be 15 pounds.  I used it a Bristol for years.  And get the guards, I took out a chunk of my finger when I was about 10!  :-X
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: SirRichardBear on January 28, 2009, 11:52:24 AM
If you plan on shooting at your local faire check with the people running the archery booth many do not allow you to shot your own bows.  Of the ones that do most will not allow recurve or modern bows.  You shouldn't have a problem with either a stright or long bow, #25 pull is a good fun choice for shooting paper but be sure to get arrows wieghted for you bow.  I second the importance of getting a shooting glove and a good fitting bracer.

http://www.3riversarchery.com/ is a good source they also have good books for the beginner.

Archery For Beginners Classic Archery Book

Archery for Beginners, was originally published in 1904, then re-printed in 1935 re-publication by a lady archer, Miss Philips, of Ivy Lodge. This re-print was made specifically with the female archer and the beginner in mind. Miss Philips, having been exposed as a young girl to an early edition of Colonel Walrond's book in her father's library, recognized the need for a simple book of instruction. She requested permission from the Walrond family to re-publish the Colonel's work thereby providing an affordable beginner's handbook. One of the most engaging aspects of this handsome booklet is the unorthodox use of animatograph photography to accurately show the physical stages of drawing the bow. Colonel Walrond himself was the subject of these intriguing photographs.

I've also had good dealings with Kee's Archery http://www.keestraditions.com/

Good luck and welcome to the ranks.  Few things are as fun as shooting with friends in friendly competition.  If your ever at Scarby look me up we have a great group of archers here
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Var Greyshadow on January 30, 2009, 07:10:23 AM
Long bows are NOT too long.  I'm 5' 3" and I shoot a 35# longbow just fine. Since there's no arrow rest, you have to angle the bow, which cuts down the length quite a bit.  Before that, I used an old Ben Pearson recurve that a friend gave me.  That one is about 4 or 4.5 feet long unstrung and is quite traditional-looking.  It's not one of those recurves with the big notch for the arrow. 

Kee's is a good source.  I talked to her at LARF.  She's not very tall either, so she could probably give you some good ideas.
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Tammy on January 30, 2009, 05:51:23 PM
Thanks everyone for all the help!!
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Tim T on January 30, 2009, 07:00:28 PM
One more place for you to check:
http://woodbows.com/index.html (ftp://http://woodbows.com/index.html)

They have rough and ready english style long bows with a draw of 25-30 lbs for $50.  I have one that I plan on finishing in the next month or so.  They have a great rustic look and shoot well.

If you want to pay a bit more, they have fancier bows as well.

Happy huntin'.
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Tammy on January 30, 2009, 08:38:14 PM
Thanks Tim! That's more in my price range for starting out!!!

I love how helpful everyone is on this forum!! Thanks!!!!!
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Cormac on January 31, 2009, 07:30:51 AM
You may want to check ebay for wood bows also.  I just purchased one for my daughter and it was around $40 with shipping.  It was unfinished so we stained it mahogony and rubbed it down with vasaline.  The handle was just a tape wrap so we leather wrapped it. It looks good and shoots really good for such an economical bow.

I have a bow from woodbows.com also and have shot it for about 4 years now.  It is starting to develop some string follow and will be retired as soon as I have a set of arrows for my new bow.

You can also find arrows on ebay for about $20 for a set of 6.  I picked up a set and they are plain, but practical.  They shoot good and I don't get bent out of shape if they get dinged up.

All this archery talk is going to have me at the range tomorrow morning.
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: anne of oaktower on January 31, 2009, 09:44:27 AM
I am so glad I stumbled across this thread!  I've been wanting to get into archery for a couple of years now, but hadn't found an economical "beginners" bow.  I'll be ordering soon  ;D
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Hoowil on March 07, 2009, 10:57:13 AM
Its been probably 15 years since I've drawn a bow, but I do remember a couple things.
I would definitely look for a local archery store. We used to have one around here that had an inside range behind the store, and would rent equipment for newbies/part time hobbyists. If you can find a place like that, if they still exist, you should be able to explain that you want to learn, and your thoughts on what you want to do. Then they can set you up with a couple rigs, and let you try them out so that you can get a real feel for each one. Even if it means more time and searching, the live experience from that before any purchase would be worth it.

Ah, but I do miss my old longbow... I'll have to hunt down some gear when the kids are old enough...
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Pascal on March 07, 2009, 06:12:38 PM
Rose City Archery at http://www.rosecityarchery.com/ (http://www.rosecityarchery.com/) is another good source for reasonably priced wood (cedar) arrows.
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Tammy on March 07, 2009, 07:18:24 PM
Thanks for that idea Hoowil! Pascal...I'll be checking that link out soon.

I'm glad others are posting on this thread.
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Robert eben Hope on March 29, 2009, 09:16:45 PM
I just started getting into traditional archery and I'll pass along the same advice that was given to me from a friend.

First try to find a place were you can try a few different bows out, you don't even need to shoot them just get a feel for them and see what fits your hand best.

Second find out your max draw wieght, you can do this by shooting at a faire and trying out a few different bows. Then buy your first bows at least 5 pounds lighter.

Your first bow should be easy for you to shoot repeatedly. The reason  is that you need to master the basics and get the form part down first. After you have perfected your form you can upgrade to a heavier bow if you want or just keep stay with a lighter bow. But the most important thing is learning good form.
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: jeduffey on April 19, 2009, 07:45:31 AM
For more information, you can also post your questions at
http://TheBowyersDen.com (http://TheBowyersDen.com) - the forum was erased by the free providers in February, but the resolute members are working hard to rebuild since this months new installation, and they are glad for new questions.

You might also be interested in gear available at http://bowstick.com
They have a sale for the rest of April.
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Robert eben Hope on April 21, 2009, 09:43:56 PM
For more information, you can also post your questions at
http://TheBowyersDen.com (http://TheBowyersDen.com) - the forum was erased by the free providers in February, but the resolute members are working hard to rebuild since this months new installation, and they are glad for new questions.

You might also be interested in gear available at http://bowstick.com
They have a sale for the rest of April.

 :o Wow those prices are pretty steep. If you are just getting into archery I would reccomend working with the fine folks at Siege Work Creations. I bought my first bow from them a little over a month a go and I love it. A great price for a beginner, combined with great people that are willing to work with you and point you in the right direction. Their prices on bows and arrows can not be beat. I just ordered my second bow from them...and already thinking of getting a third...check them out and see for yourselves.

http://siegeworkcreations.com/
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Bowsmith on July 05, 2009, 02:33:29 PM
You could always use a flatbow, shorter but wider than the longbow.

I'm a bowmaker myself, formally a blademsmith, who got into bows as a way to be creative and continue to work with my hands after I was unable to make blades anymore.

I'm also a big medieval archery fan, tho a novice.  (Curse you, S.M. Stirling!! :D )

I make all my bows out of red oak, by hand, sans power tools.  They come out looking a bit rougher than the big production models, but are just as effective.  Without backing the max draw is around 45#, which is still sufficient for light hunting duties.

Here's some of my work.

A flatbow named "Twisted Sister".  A 66" long Flatbow, 37# draw @28"  She's also for sale. $110.

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/TwistedSister2-1.jpg)

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/TwistedSister1.jpg)

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/TwistedSister4.jpg)

An English Longbow....nicknamed "Scarface".  45#@28"

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/scarface11.jpg)

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/Scarface2.jpg)

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/scarface9.jpg)

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/scarface7.jpg)

And a LOTR styled bow I made for my neighbors 8 year old son's birthday....

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/JasonsBow3.jpg)

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/JasonsBow8.jpg)

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/JasonsBow7.jpg)

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/JasonsBow6.jpg)

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/JasonsBow4.jpg)

If you have any questions, I'll be happy to answer them.
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: uncletimcobleigh on July 05, 2009, 06:32:21 PM
Beautiful work, Bowsmith!
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Bowsmith on July 06, 2009, 12:55:20 AM
Thanks!

I'm working on one design now thats heavily fantasy/ren inspired called the "DragonFire Bow".

I'll post some pics whenI get it done.
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Lady Mikayla of Phoenicia on July 06, 2009, 08:13:12 PM
I also am 5'4" and pull about 35 - 40 lbs.  I would really like to have a longbow w/shelf to use especially for the Loch Norman Highland Games next spring for about $50 would be great for my budge too!  I took archery as a Phys Ed class in college and only get to shoot at Faires and sometimes there set-ups are rather awful!  VARF has the best opportunity I have found yet!
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Cormac on July 06, 2009, 09:20:11 PM
While it does not have a shelf cut in woodbows.com has pretty good deals.  I have shot one of their longbows for going on 4 years now and other than starting to develop string follow it has performed very nicely.  I have now purchased a bow for my daughter and added a shelf.  To add a shelf I re wrapped the handle and added a leather wedge on the appropriate side of the bow.  Cost of bow, leather, and wedge was about $45.  Siegeworks was also recommended by a friend that purchased a bow and set of arrows for his son.

Get a bow and shoot lots! 
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Chris B on July 27, 2009, 08:33:51 PM
You could always use a flatbow, shorter but wider than the longbow.

I'm a bowmaker myself, formally a blademsmith, who got into bows as a way to be creative and continue to work with my hands after I was unable to make blades anymore.

I'm also a big medieval archery fan, tho a novice.  (Curse you, S.M. Stirling!! :D )

I make all my bows out of red oak, by hand, sans power tools.  They come out looking a bit rougher than the big production models, but are just as effective.  Without backing the max draw is around 45#, which is still sufficient for light hunting duties.

Here's some of my work.

A flatbow named "Twisted Sister".  A 66" long Flatbow, 37# draw @28"  She's also for sale. $110.

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/TwistedSister2-1.jpg)

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/TwistedSister1.jpg)

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/TwistedSister4.jpg)

An English Longbow....nicknamed "Scarface".  45#@28"

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/scarface11.jpg)

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/Scarface2.jpg)

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/scarface9.jpg)

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/scarface7.jpg)

And a LOTR styled bow I made for my neighbors 8 year old son's birthday....

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/JasonsBow3.jpg)

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/JasonsBow8.jpg)

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/JasonsBow7.jpg)

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/JasonsBow6.jpg)

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/JasonsBow4.jpg)

If you have any questions, I'll be happy to answer them.

Is that you Patrick?
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Bowsmith on July 29, 2009, 03:11:35 PM
Sorry, but I'm no patrick.
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Cormac on July 29, 2009, 05:48:30 PM
Bowsmith

Do you build recurves also?
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: DarkLord on July 29, 2009, 07:20:18 PM
Well it's a little off topic but I rarely get a chance to post pictures of my Horned Bow Pestilence made for me by bowstick.com at the top of the page.  So here's a couple.

(http://fast1.onesite.com/darklord.renspace.com/pestilence/large/8a22c36ced9731bc4369553bc354eda3.jpg?v=134550)
(http://fast1.onesite.com/darklord.renspace.com/pestilence/large/908aea713fd2c8d431c47793869fd6fc.jpg?v=134550)
(http://fast1.onesite.com/darklord.renspace.com/pestilence/large/0d761bbbcc65d31dd7d11b3b4ed7f6f7.jpg?v=134550)

Okay.  Sorry for the detour.  I don't see too many bow threads!
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Chris B on July 30, 2009, 07:08:45 AM
Sorry, but I'm no patrick.

No Problem.  My mistake.  You look a lot like someone who has posted on My Armoury and other historical sites a lot over the years.
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Chris B on July 30, 2009, 07:09:46 AM
Dark Lord,

Now that is an awesome looking bow.  What is it's draw weight?  Is it a composite bow or made of traditional materials? 
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Bowsmith on July 30, 2009, 09:11:02 AM
Bowsmith

Do you build recurves also?

Funny you should ask.

I made my first one yesterday.  I'm taking pictures of it for a build along I'm doing.

DL, your bow looks like it's made of horn, no?

Tiller seems a bit off, with the lower limb pulling more than the upper.

Whats the draw weight, and how does it shoot?
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: DarkLord on July 30, 2009, 06:23:40 PM
It draws 37 lbs and is made of three different types of antelope horn.  My memory fails me a bit here but I beleve two are springbok and gemsbok.  It shoots fine but doesn't get the distance of say an SCA longbow.  But for style it can't be beat :)
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Macbain on August 02, 2009, 08:51:44 PM
It draws 37 lbs and is made of three different types of antelope horn.  My memory fails me a bit here but I beleve two are springbok and gemsbok.  It shoots fine but doesn't get the distance of say an SCA longbow.  But for style it can't be beat :)
I'm very surprised that the draw is only 37 lbs! Traditionally horn bows pull in excess of 100 lbs. They are certainly a chore to produce my first hornbow (and only so far) was a reflexed static recurve. Korean hornbows are most likely the earliest variation and when unstrung would curl into a "o" and it took almost a month of several hours a week. It's finnished weight was 79 lbs. (the lightest hornbow i had heard of until now) It was stolen at a glass buttes knapp in (primitive skills gathering). Traditional hornbows were very short often called horse bows because that was their intended use because they could pull more than three times the length than any wood bow of the same size and at a heavier poundage. I've made a few english longbows, some northern plains style bows (mostly variations of flatbow), reflex deflex, various recurves, and none of them could compare to the speed of the hornbow. Hornbows are great though! I bet those bits of horn high up on the limbs add a lot of handshock and decrease speed if i were you i would consider removing them. Although making a bow is difficult any bowyer will tell you that the real secret to archery is the arrow. You need the proper spine (stiffness or lack thereof) in an arrow as well as the proper taper for your style, application and lenth for your anchor point. I could talk about this for hours but i'll spare you guys ~.o
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Lady Rebecca on August 03, 2009, 07:40:04 PM
So I'm interested in getting into archery, and I was searching ebay, and found this bow - a Shakespeare longbow, that's definitely within my price range. Doing a quick google search, though, I can't really find any info on that particular bow. Is this a good deal?

http://cgi.ebay.com/Hunting-Long-Bow_W0QQitemZ150363356968QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item23025abf28&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14

Here's another one that was in my price range, too. Any opinions?
http://cgi.ebay.com/Vintage-Wood-Long-Bow-Recurve-Bow_W0QQitemZ200369446441QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item2ea6f31e29&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14

I have yet to check out most of the sites listed on this thread, but the only thing at 3 Rivers that was anywhere near my price range (and is still a bit more than I would like to spend) is the Titan Recurve Youth Bow, but as I am 5'10" I'm guessing I need a bigger bow.
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Bowsmith on August 03, 2009, 08:47:28 PM
Lady Rebecca, the first bow you mention is a hunting recurve, not a longbow.  Prolly notwhat you're looking for, and definately not period.

The second IS a longbow, a very old one by the look, and without a bunchof information, like what kind of wood it is, and how it's been kept.  Old bows not kept and treated properly can absorb moisture, which can affect the bow.

That said,it looks like it's been knocked around a bit, and MAY stand up to some moderate shooting.  I wouldn't suggest going up against Guy of Gisborne with it......

If you do get it, have it refurbished, get a new string for it (56"), and maybe get the grip re-wrapped.  You may find the makers info underneath what looks to be the original wrap.

Cormac, here's the recuve I mentioned, 3/4 finished today, and strung and shot for the first time.  For about 3 hours.

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/100_1030.jpg)

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/100_1031.jpg)

(http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/Bladesmith_2006/100_1032.jpg)

Still have lots of sanding to do, and some custom carving on the tips to dressit up abit.  I'm thinking about using Viking dragon prow heads for the tips.
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Tammy on February 22, 2010, 03:23:11 AM
I know I've not posted in forever...but I thought I'd update y'all on my path into archery!
So, months ago I started this thread with an inkling to start learning about archery, and get a bow. Since then I've found out that my g'ma, aunts & dad used to compete, and win trophies in competitions!  :o Well, that of course fueled my desire. One of my uncles gave me a beautiful recurve, but I can't pull it back.  :(
For my birthday a couple of my friends set it up at a local archery club for us to get a short lesson, and shot some arrows. IT WAS SO MUCH FUN!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I had a hard time keeping my elbow out, so I've got a nasty bruise (yes, I was wearing an arm guard, but it wouldn't fold with the elbow), but it's worth it!! I did three good groupings, and hit my target with a little over half the shots.  ;D
I've now gotten two bows I can pull back from a local sporting goods shop. They are both longbows, but being made of fiberglass they are very modern looking. I am planning on getting a more traditional looking bow as funds allow.
I love archery...and turning circles into pincushions is tons of fun!!   ;) :D
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: gem on February 27, 2010, 04:59:32 PM
Great thread!  I've been wanting to get into archery, but wanted to start with lessons, maybe, instead of with buying a bow. All I can find locally seems to be geared toward hunters, which is not something I'm interested in.  I was planning to talk to the bowsmith at our local fair, but that doesn't start until September.

Any tips on finding places to learn?
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Tammy on February 27, 2010, 07:18:21 PM
I would contact one of the clubs. Most of the places around here will also allow beginners to use the facilities, and some offer classes. Even if the people are mostly interested in hunting, doesn't mean you have to be. They will have targets (granted, some might be 3D) to shoot at.
Seriously, I'd call them. That's what my friend did. The place we went offers classes on Tuesday nights in the Spring, Sherry told them I just wanted a short lesson as a birthday gift...and the president of the club came out on a beautiful Saturday and spent most of the day inside showing 3 gals how to shoot bows!

I know my stance is off...
(http://hphotos-snc3.fbcdn.net/hs377.snc3/24143_324859594325_707144325_3364971_3997710_n.jpg)


(http://photos-b.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash1/hs437.ash1/24143_324857549325_707144325_3364966_3865230_n.jpg)

It was SO much fun!!
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Cormac on March 01, 2010, 10:06:21 AM
Great thread!  I've been wanting to get into archery, but wanted to start with lessons, maybe, instead of with buying a bow. All I can find locally seems to be geared toward hunters, which is not something I'm interested in.  I was planning to talk to the bowsmith at our local fair, but that doesn't start until September.

Any tips on finding places to learn?

If you have a shop in the area that has a decent selection of traditional archery supplies they could be a good resource.  I am very fortunate to have a very good recurve bow builder in the area that actually has a two day spring "camp" for traditional shooters.  Pricey, but well worth it as they will help you correct bad habits and develop good form.

If you can not locate a shop that can help with traditional shooting you may want to look for an SCA or mountain man rendevous group in your area.  Both of these often have an archery element to them.

All else fails there are a number of books available and you should also be able to find a dvd or two that will help you along.  Develop good form and then practice....lots. 
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Craigmeister on September 30, 2013, 10:23:12 PM
My wife, some friends and I learned how to shoot longbows at a local city park gymnasium.  Yes, it was inside so the rain and wind wouldn't affect our shots (and probably to prevent someone from getting shot downrange).  A few years after that, I found a very affordable 35 pound draw Hickory long bow from Dave Ruff at www.stickbowarchery.com (http://www.stickbowarchery.com).  He's a great guy and has a booth at lots of Renfaires across the country.  My longbow finishes off my Robin Hood outfit quite nicely.
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: escherblacksmith on October 01, 2013, 08:54:13 AM
dang, that is bringing one from the dead . . . .
Title: Re: Beginner Archery
Post by: Tripletap on October 05, 2013, 11:05:00 PM
I just recently started getting into archery myself, I scored a nice recurve at a pawn shop for $40.00! (PSE Heritage Bullseye Takedown)
I got hooked on traditional archery by going to a couple classes from "Meetup.com", the class was Longbow and Atlatl, it was too much fun!
I joined the "Austin Archery Club" for $50.00 a year it is in the woods and hills they have 30+ 3D targets all set up so you hike then see a target, and shoot it.
They have cool tournaments all the time.
My next bow is going to be a "Horse Bow" that will be my Ren Faire Bow as well, archery is too much fun!