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Author Topic: Antonis Mor 1516-1576  (Read 8588 times)

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Offline DonaCatalina

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Antonis Mor 1516-1576
« on: March 31, 2009, 11:37:05 AM »
I don't remember seeing this portrait before. Much more extensive use of browns than I'm used to.

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Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2009, 09:56:15 AM »
This one is said to be Jane Dormer.
Her dress looks very Spanish to me
« Last Edit: October 08, 2010, 10:15:54 AM by DonaCatalina »
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Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2010, 09:04:42 AM »
I'm beginning to think that Brown was much more popular circa 1550 that was usually believed.
Brown for peasants only may be one of those renfaire myths.
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Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2010, 09:19:31 AM »
Margarethe of Parma.
This is a portrait that was done late in the artist's life when many of his subjects were at the Imperial Court in Austria.
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Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2010, 08:43:15 AM »
Cardinal Granville's dwarf and dog. The only one in this picture who looks happy is the dog. Can you imagine what kind of like this man had?
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Offline Anna Iram

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Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2010, 05:43:23 PM »
Elizabeth wore brown....and lots of beading. I love the colors of this portrait, though it almost seems paintings of her were reworked over and over, like a paper doll, until one doesn't even know what the actual gown looked like.

*Viewed in Gallery II*
http://historymedren.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/elizface.htm

« Last Edit: October 03, 2010, 05:56:24 PM by Anna Iram »

Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2010, 06:10:00 AM »
I agree- especially later paintings of Elizabeth are very stylized. Though I gather that showing her true age would have been frowned upon so painters avoided painting her as she actually looked.
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Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2010, 02:33:53 PM »
This one is titled Lady of the Hapsbourg Cour. You have to wonder how it felt to have all those pearls in her hair.
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Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2010, 02:36:53 PM »
This painting has been identofied as Mary I Tudor when she was much younger.
I'd like to find this one in color.
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Offline Anna Iram

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Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
« Reply #9 on: October 04, 2010, 03:42:41 PM »
I like her smile in that picture. Very pretty.

Okay, so I got off aon a tangent with my last post and missed the point of the thread.  :D Sorry Dona.

I like this gentleman. A man of principles

William of Orange aka William the Silent as painted by Antonis Mor 1555

From the Wiki:

William I, Prince of Orange (24 April 1533 – 10 July 1584), also widely known as William the Silent (Dutch: Willem de Zwijger), or simply William of Orange (Dutch: Willem van Oranje), was the main leader of the Dutch revolt against the Spanish that set off the Eighty Years' War and resulted in the formal independence of the United Provinces in 1648. He was born in the House of Nassau as Count of Nassau-Dillenburg. He became Prince of Orange in 1544 and is thereby the founder of the branch House of Orange-Nassau.

A wealthy nobleman, William originally served the Habsburgs as a member of the court of Margaret of Parma, governor of the Spanish Netherlands. Unhappy with the centralisation of political power away from the local estates and with the Spanish persecution of Dutch Protestants, William joined the Dutch uprising and turned against his former masters. The most influential and politically capable of the rebels, he led the Dutch to several successes in the fight against the Spanish. Declared an outlaw by the Spanish king in 1580, he was assassinated by Balthasar Gérard (also written as 'Gerardts') in Delft four years later




http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_I_of_Orange
« Last Edit: October 04, 2010, 03:43:19 PM by Anna Iram »

Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
« Reply #10 on: October 05, 2010, 04:58:08 AM »
I like her smile in that picture. Very pretty.

Okay, so I got off aon a tangent with my last post and missed the point of the thread.  :D Sorry Dona.


Actually I thought you were doing a comparison.  ;)
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Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
« Reply #11 on: October 06, 2010, 09:46:18 AM »
Anna of Austria, Queen of Spain. The single glove intrigues me. I'm sure it had some significance at the time.
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Offline DonaCatalina

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Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
« Reply #12 on: October 08, 2010, 10:22:58 AM »
Sir Henry Lee.
Depending on who is doing the interpreting, the ring on the cord symbolizes love, friendship, loyalty and so on into erotic usages.
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Offline Anna Iram

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Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
« Reply #13 on: October 08, 2010, 10:35:27 AM »
I love the symbology in paintings such as this. The dog as a symbol of loyalty or this rather overt, and yes, slightly erotic gesture. The use of ermine as a sign of purity as well as that of a lady dipping her fingertips in a bowl of water.  :) I like these touches.


Offline Welsh Wench

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Re: Antonis Mor 1516-1576
« Reply #14 on: October 08, 2010, 07:18:31 PM »
Cardinal Granville's dwarf and dog. The only one in this picture who looks happy is the dog. Can you imagine what kind of like this man had?

That portrait hangs in the Louvre.

So I did a bit of research.....

Cardinal Granvelle was also painted by Titian but the portrait by Mors of his dwarf and the dog (which is a mastiff} was more famous than any picture of Granvelle himself.
And it initiated a Spanish tradition of painting court dwarfs.

At one time a dwarf was considered a necessity of every noble family. The Roman Emperors all had their dwarfs. And it was the fashion of the time that dwarfs were noted for their wit and wisdom.
The Court dwarfs were allowed unlimited freedom of speech, and in order to get at truths other men were afraid to utter, one of the Kings of Denmark made one of his dwarfs Prime Minister.

Catherine de Medici had three couples of dwarfs.
In England and in Spain the nobles had the portraits of their dwarfs painted by the celebrated artists of the day. Velasquez has represented Don Antonio el Ingles, a dwarf of fine appearance, with a large dog, probably to bring out the dwarf's inferior height. This artist also painted a great number of other dwarfs at the Court of Spain, and in one of his paintings he portrays the Infanta Marguerite accompanied by her male and female dwarfs.

Bottom line is it might not have been so bad to be a 'little person' if you got to play the Big House!


« Last Edit: October 08, 2010, 07:22:37 PM by Welsh Wench »
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